62

I have functions in a 'library' file to be called from my 'worker' script.

Library File

function ShowMessage($AValue)
{
  $a = new-object -comobject wscript.shell
  $b = $a.popup( $AValue )
}

Worker File

. {c:\scratch\b.ps1}

ShowMessage "Hello"

Running the 'worker' script works fine when in the PowerShell IDE but when I right-click the worker file and choose 'Run with PowerShell' it cannot find the function 'ShowMessage'. Both files are in the same folder. What might be happening?

1
  • 1
    Also note that invoking the script using &, eg. & "c:\scratch\b.ps1" doesn't import the functions.
    – ashes999
    Commented Aug 10, 2017 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

102

In the worker file change to this:

. "c:\scratch\b.ps1"

ShowMessage "Hello"

As @RoiDanton mentioned below:

Attention when using relative pathing: Don't forget to prepend a dot before the path . ".\b.ps1".

The first dot is an operator used to modify the scope and in that context it has nothing to do with paths. See Dot Source Notation.

3
  • 11
    Attention when using relative pathing: Don't forget to prepend a dot before the path . ".\b.ps1". Being very new to psh, I didn't know that the first dot is an operator to modify the scope and in that context has nothing to do with paths. See Dot Source Notation.
    – Richard
    Commented Nov 3, 2017 at 13:02
  • @RoiDanton you're great Roi... thanks for adding this comment... this is what I was searching for, that is, how to call a function from another script that's inside the same folder\path using relative path. Commented May 5, 2018 at 20:15
  • The relative pathing not working for me. I'm using PowerShell 5.1, does this have anything to do with it?
    – Rod
    Commented May 20, 2022 at 15:52
19

In your worker file, dot-source the library file, this will load all content (functions, variables, etc) to the global scope, and then you'll be able to call functions from the library file.

=================== Worker file ==========================
# dot-source library script
# notice that you need to have a space 
# between the dot and the path of the script
. c:\library.ps1

ShowMessage -AValue Hello
=================== End Worker file ======================
5
  • 7
    It's safer to enclose path in quotes, in case there will be space, like Program Files Commented Dec 14, 2011 at 9:20
  • 1
    Agree, but this path has no spaces :). I tend to remove quotes when they are not necessary.
    – Shay Levy
    Commented Dec 14, 2011 at 9:42
  • 2
    Good answer, but it's the current scope that "dot-sourcing" a file causes it to run in, which may or may not be the global scope.
    – mklement0
    Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 1:54
  • @mklement0 How do you know/set the scope there?
    – not2qubit
    Commented May 24 at 12:52
  • 1
    @mklement0 Sorry, I found out you can set the [global, local] scope of the functions using: function global:myfunction {..}. For more info use: Get-Help about_Scopes.
    – not2qubit
    Commented May 24 at 23:15

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