198

I am trying to store a .Net TimeSpan in SQL server 2008 R2.

EF Code First seems to be suggesting it should be stored as a Time(7) in SQL.

However TimeSpan in .Net can handle longer periods than 24 hours.

What is the best way to handle storing .Net TimeSpan in SQL server?

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228

I'd store it in the database as a BIGINT and I'd store the number of ticks (eg. TimeSpan.Ticks property).

That way, if I wanted to get a TimeSpan object when I retrieve it, I could just do TimeSpan.FromTicks(value) which would be easy.

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  • 3
    How would you handle calculations in sql lets say you needed to calculate how many hours it contains? – Peter Jan 15 '16 at 13:26
  • 10
    I'd probably convert the ticks into a time object like this: SELECT CAST(DATEADD(MILLISECOND, @Ticks/CAST(10000 AS BIGINT), '1900-01-01') AS TIME). The '1900-01-01' date doesn't matter, of course, it's just the third variable required by the DATEADD(...) function. Remember there are 100 nanoseconds in a tick, but if you use DATEADD(NANOSECOND... you're likely to get an overflow, hence using milliseconds. Also remember that you should check this fact using C# TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond (should be 10000) to be sure. – Tom Chantler Jan 15 '16 at 14:30
  • An option is store it as a string, you can then load it using TimeSpan.Parse(text). not ideal from a size perspective or SQL querys but can be parsed in TSQL if needed – Walter Vehoeven Aug 24 '18 at 15:08
66

Thanks for the advice. As there is no equivalent in SQL server. I simply created a 2nd field which converted the TimeSpan to ticks and stored that in the DB. I then prevented storing the TimeSpan

public Int64 ValidityPeriodTicks { get; set; }

[NotMapped]
public TimeSpan ValidityPeriod
{
    get { return TimeSpan.FromTicks(ValidityPeriodTicks); }
    set { ValidityPeriodTicks = value.Ticks; }
}
| |
  • 6
    Also for anyone using EF Core - in 2.1 you can use value conversions and TimeSpanToTicksConverter to map timespans to ticks in the database transparently – GraemeMiller Apr 22 '18 at 12:44
30

If you don't have to store more than 24 hours you can just store time, since SQL Server 2008 and later the mapping is

time (SQL Server) <-> TimeSpan(.NET)

No conversions needed if you only need to store 24 hours or less.

Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc716729(v=vs.110).aspx

But, if you want to store more than 24h, you are going to need to store it in ticks, retrieve the data and then convert to TimeSpan. For example

int timeData = yourContext.yourTable.FirstOrDefault();
TimeSpan ts = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(timeData);
| |
  • 23
    As the OP says, the "time" DataType in SQL Server only supports up to 24h, he wants to store > 24h – MichelZ Mar 22 '14 at 14:24
  • 11
    Also, TimeSpan (.NET) can be negative whereas Time (SQL Server) cannot. – Edward Jul 1 '15 at 15:56
  • 11
    There is a major difference between a time and a duration. The time represent the time on a certain day whereas the duration is the difference between two moments. Compare it to a location (time) and distance (duration). – Ramon de Klein Jun 1 '16 at 14:45
  • 3
    ^ Exactly. -- The SQL Time type is not meant to represent a duration, but the Time part of a DateTime value; it's a terrible choice for TimeSpan. – BrainSlugs83 Aug 15 '17 at 0:04
19

There isn't a direct equivalent. Just store it numerically, e.g. number of seconds or something appropriate to your required accuracy.

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7

I know this is an old question, but I wanted to make sure a couple of other options are noted.

Since you can't store a TimeSpan greater than 24 hours in a time sql datatype field; a couple of other options might be.

  1. Use a varchar(xx) to store the ToString of the TimeSpan. The benefit of this is the precision doesn't have to be baked into the datatype or the calculation, (seconds vs milliseconds vs days vs fortnights) All you need to to is use TimeSpan.Parse/TryParse. This is what I would do.

  2. Use a second date, datetime or datetimeoffset, that stores the result of first date + timespan. Reading from the db is a matter of TimeSpan x = SecondDate - FirstDate. Using this option will protect you for other non .NET data access libraries access the same data but not understanding TimeSpans; in case you have such an environment.

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  • 1
    Option 2 is sounds like it might come in handy every now and then. thx – rahicks Jul 16 '18 at 1:49
3

To be consistent with what is probably the most likely source of generating a time span (computing the difference of 2 times or date-times), you may want to store a .NET TimeSpan as a SQL Server DateTime Type.

This is because in SQL Server, the difference of 2 DateTime's (Cast to Float's and then Cast back to a DateTime) is simply a DateTime relative to Jan. 1, 1900. Ex. A difference of +0.1 second would be January 1, 1900 00:00:00.100 and -0.1 second would be Dec. 31, 1899 23:59:59.900.

To convert a .NET TimeSpan to a SQL Server DateTime Type, you would first convert it to a .NET DateTime Type by adding it to a DateTime of Jan. 1, 1900. Of course, when you read it into .NET from SQL Server, you would first read it into a .NET DateTime and then subtract Jan. 1, 1900 from it to convert it to a .NET TimeSpan.

For use cases where the time spans are being generated from SQL Server DateTime's and within SQL Server (i.e. via T-SQL) and SQL Server is prior to 2016, depending on your range and precision needs, it may not be practical to store them as milliseconds (not to mention Ticks) because the Int Type returned by DateDiff (vs. the BigInt from SS 2016+'s DateDiff_Big) overflows after ~24 days worth of milliseconds and ~67 yrs. of seconds. Whereas, this solution will handle time spans with precision down to 0.1 seconds and from -147 to +8,099 yrs..

WARNINGS:

  1. This would only work if the difference relative to Jan. 1, 1900 would result in a value within the range of a SQL Server DateTime Type (Jan. 1, 1753 to Dec. 31, 9999 aka -147 to +8,099 yrs.). We don't have to worry near as much on the .NET TimeSpan side, since it can hold ~29 k to +29 k yrs. I didn't mention the SQL Server DateTime2 Type (whose range, on the negative side, is much greater than SQL Server DateTime's), because: a) it cannot be converted to a numeric via a simple Cast and b) DateTime's range should suffice for the vast majority of use cases.

  2. SQL Server DateTime differences computed via the Cast - to - Float - and - back method does not appear to be accurate beyond 0.1 seconds.

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  • I forgot I'd even read this Q much less that I wrote this A, and was searching for an A again. I started reading this A and thought to myself: (Wow, this is the best answer so far!). :D – Tom Jul 18 '19 at 3:45
3

There are multiple ways how to present a timespan in the database.

time

This datatype is supported since SQL Server 2008 and is the prefered way to store a TimeSpan. There is no mapping needed. It also works well with SQL code.

public TimeSpan ValidityPeriod { get; set; }

However, as stated in the original question, this datatype is limited to 24 hours.

datetimeoffset

The datetimeoffset datatype maps directly to System.DateTimeOffset. It's used to express the offset between a datetime/datetime2 to UTC, but you can also use it for TimeSpan.

However, since the datatype suggests a very specific semantic, so you should also consider other options.

datetime / datetime2

One approach might be to use the datetime or datetime2 types. This is best in scenarios where you need to process the values in the database directly, ie. for views, stored procedures, or reports. The drawback is that you need to substract the value DateTime(1900,01,01,00,00,00) from the date to get back the timespan in your business logic.

public DateTime ValidityPeriod { get; set; }

[NotMapped]
public TimeSpan ValidityPeriodTimeSpan
{
    get { return ValidityPeriod - DateTime(1900,01,01,00,00,00); }
    set { ValidityPeriod = DateTime(1900,01,01,00,00,00) + value; }
}

bigint

Another approach might be to convert the TimeSpan into ticks and use the bigint datatype. However, this approach has the drawback that it's cumbersome to use in SQL queries.

public long ValidityPeriod { get; set; }

[NotMapped]
public TimeSpan ValidityPeriodTimeSpan
{
    get { return TimeSpan.FromTicks(ValidityPeriod); }
    set { ValidityPeriod = value.Ticks; }
}

varchar(N)

This is best for cases where the value should be readable by humans. You might also use this format in SQL queries by utilizing the CONVERT(datetime, ValidityPeriod) function. Dependent on the required precision, you will need between 8 and 25 characters.

public string ValidityPeriod { get; set; }

[NotMapped]
public TimeSpan ValidityPeriodTimeSpan
{
    get { return TimeSpan.Parse(ValidityPeriod); }
    set { ValidityPeriod = value.ToString("HH:mm:ss"); }
}

Bonus: Period and Duration

Using a string, you can also store NodaTime datatypes, especially Duration and Period. The first is basically the same as a TimeSpan, while the later respects that some days and months are longer or shorter than others (ie. January has 31 days and February has 28 or 29; some days are longer or shorter because of daylight saving time). In such cases, using a TimeSpan is the wrong choice.

You can use this code to convert Periods:

using NodaTime;
using NodaTime.Serialization.JsonNet;

internal static class PeriodExtensions
{
    public static Period ToPeriod(this string input)
    {
        var js = JsonSerializer.Create(new JsonSerializerSettings());
        js.ConfigureForNodaTime(DateTimeZoneProviders.Tzdb);
        var quoted = string.Concat(@"""", input, @"""");
        return js.Deserialize<Period>(new JsonTextReader(new StringReader(quoted)));
    }
}

And then use it like

public string ValidityPeriod { get; set; }

[NotMapped]
public Period ValidityPeriodPeriod
{
    get => ValidityPeriod.ToPeriod();
    set => ValidityPeriod = value.ToString();
}

I really like NodaTime and it often saves me from tricky bugs and lots of headache. The drawback here is that you really can't use it in SQL queries and need to do calculations in-memory.

CLR User-Defined Type

You also have the option to use a custom datatype and support a custom TimeSpan class directly. See CLR User-Defined Types for details.

The drawback here is that the datatype might not behave well with SQL Reports. Also, some versions of SQL Server (Azure, Linux, Data Warehouse) are not supported.

Value Conversions

Starting with EntityFramework Core 2.1, you have the option to use Value Conversions.

However, when using this, EF will not be able to convert many queries into SQL, causing queries to run in-memory; potentially transfering lots and lots of data to your application.

So at least for now, it might be better not to use it, and just map the query result with Automapper.

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1

Typically, I store a TimeSpan as a bigint populated with ticks from the TimeSpan.Ticks property as previously suggested. You can also store a TimeSpan as a varchar(26) populated with the output of TimeSpan.ToString(). The four scalar functions (ConvertFromTimeSpanString, ConvertToTimeSpanString, DateAddTicks, DateDiffTicks) that I wrote are helpful for handling TimeSpan on the SQL side and avoid the hacks that would produce artificially bounded ranges. If you can store the interval in a .NET TimeSpan at all it should work with these functions also. Additionally, the functions allow you to work with TimeSpans and 100-nanosecond ticks even when using technologies that don't include the .NET Framework.

DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[DateDiffTicks]
GO

DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[DateAddTicks]
GO

DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[ConvertToTimeSpanString]
GO

DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[ConvertFromTimeSpanString]
GO

SET ANSI_NULLS OFF
GO

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF
GO

-- =============================================
-- Author:      James Coe
-- Create date: 2011-05-23
-- Description: Converts from a varchar(26) TimeSpan string to a bigint containing the number of 100 nanosecond ticks.
-- =============================================
/*
    [-][d.]hh:mm:ss[.fffffff] 

    "-" 
     A minus sign, which indicates a negative time interval. No sign is included for a positive time span.

    "d" 
     The number of days in the time interval. This element is omitted if the time interval is less than one day. 

    "hh" 
     The number of hours in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 23. 

    "mm" 
     The number of minutes in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 59. 

    "ss" 
     The number of seconds in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 59. 

    "fffffff" 
     Fractional seconds in the time interval. This element is omitted if the time interval does not include 
     fractional seconds. If present, fractional seconds are always expressed using seven decimal digits.
    */
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ConvertFromTimeSpanString] (@timeSpan varchar(26))
RETURNS bigint
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @hourStart int
    DECLARE @minuteStart int
    DECLARE @secondStart int
    DECLARE @ticks bigint
    DECLARE @hours bigint
    DECLARE @minutes bigint
    DECLARE @seconds DECIMAL(9, 7)

    SET @hourStart = CHARINDEX('.', @timeSpan) + 1
    SET @minuteStart = CHARINDEX(':', @timeSpan) + 1
    SET @secondStart = CHARINDEX(':', @timespan, @minuteStart) + 1
    SET @ticks = 0

    IF (@hourStart > 1 AND @hourStart < @minuteStart)
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = CONVERT(bigint, LEFT(@timespan, @hourstart - 2)) * 864000000000
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @hourStart = 1
    END

    SET @hours = CONVERT(bigint, SUBSTRING(@timespan, @hourStart, @minuteStart - @hourStart - 1))
    SET @minutes = CONVERT(bigint, SUBSTRING(@timespan, @minuteStart, @secondStart - @minuteStart - 1))
    SET @seconds = CONVERT(DECIMAL(9, 7), SUBSTRING(@timespan, @secondStart, LEN(@timeSpan) - @secondStart + 1))

    IF (@ticks < 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks - @hours * 36000000000
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks + @hours * 36000000000
    END

    IF (@ticks < 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks - @minutes * 600000000
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks + @minutes * 600000000
    END

    IF (@ticks < 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks - @seconds * 10000000.0
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @ticks = @ticks + @seconds * 10000000.0
    END

    RETURN @ticks
END
GO

-- =============================================
-- Author:      James Coe
-- Create date: 2011-05-23
-- Description: Converts from a bigint containing the number of 100 nanosecond ticks to a varchar(26) TimeSpan string.
-- =============================================
/*
[-][d.]hh:mm:ss[.fffffff] 

"-" 
 A minus sign, which indicates a negative time interval. No sign is included for a positive time span.

"d" 
 The number of days in the time interval. This element is omitted if the time interval is less than one day. 

"hh" 
 The number of hours in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 23. 

"mm" 
 The number of minutes in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 59. 

"ss" 
 The number of seconds in the time interval, ranging from 0 to 59. 

"fffffff" 
 Fractional seconds in the time interval. This element is omitted if the time interval does not include 
 fractional seconds. If present, fractional seconds are always expressed using seven decimal digits.
*/
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ConvertToTimeSpanString] (@ticks bigint)
RETURNS varchar(26)
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @timeSpanString varchar(26)

    IF (@ticks < 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @timeSpanString = '-'
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        SET @timeSpanString = ''
    END

    -- Days
    DECLARE @days bigint

    SET @days = FLOOR(ABS(@ticks / 864000000000.0))

    IF (@days > 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @timeSpanString = @timeSpanString + CONVERT(varchar(26), @days) + '.'
    END

    SET @ticks = ABS(@ticks % 864000000000)
    -- Hours
    SET @timeSpanString = @timeSpanString + RIGHT('0' + CONVERT(varchar(26), FLOOR(@ticks / 36000000000.0)), 2) + ':'
    SET @ticks = @ticks % 36000000000
    -- Minutes
    SET @timeSpanString = @timeSpanString + RIGHT('0' + CONVERT(varchar(26), FLOOR(@ticks / 600000000.0)), 2) + ':'
    SET @ticks = @ticks % 600000000
    -- Seconds
    SET @timeSpanString = @timeSpanString + RIGHT('0' + CONVERT(varchar(26), FLOOR(@ticks / 10000000.0)), 2)
    SET @ticks = @ticks % 10000000

    -- Fractional Seconds
    IF (@ticks > 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @timeSpanString = @timeSpanString + '.' + LEFT(CONVERT(varchar(26), @ticks) + '0000000', 7)
    END

    RETURN @timeSpanString
END
GO

-- =============================================
-- Author:      James Coe
-- Create date: 2011-05-23
-- Description: Adds the specified number of 100 nanosecond ticks to a date.
-- =============================================
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[DateAddTicks] (
    @ticks bigint
    , @starting_date datetimeoffset
    )
RETURNS datetimeoffset
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @dateTimeResult datetimeoffset

    IF (@ticks < 0)
    BEGIN
        -- Hours
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(HOUR, CEILING(@ticks / 36000000000.0), @starting_date)
        SET @ticks = @ticks % 36000000000
        -- Seconds
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(SECOND, CEILING(@ticks / 10000000.0), @dateTimeResult)
        SET @ticks = @ticks % 10000000
        -- Nanoseconds
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(NANOSECOND, @ticks * 100, @dateTimeResult)
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        -- Hours
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(HOUR, FLOOR(@ticks / 36000000000.0), @starting_date)
        SET @ticks = @ticks % 36000000000
        -- Seconds
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(SECOND, FLOOR(@ticks / 10000000.0), @dateTimeResult)
        SET @ticks = @ticks % 10000000
        -- Nanoseconds
        SET @dateTimeResult = DATEADD(NANOSECOND, @ticks * 100, @dateTimeResult)
    END

    RETURN @dateTimeResult
END
GO

-- =============================================
-- Author:      James Coe
-- Create date: 2011-05-23
-- Description:  Gets the difference between two dates in 100 nanosecond ticks.
-- =============================================
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[DateDiffTicks] (
    @starting_date datetimeoffset
    , @ending_date datetimeoffset
    )
RETURNS bigint
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @ticks bigint
    DECLARE @days bigint
    DECLARE @hours bigint
    DECLARE @minutes bigint
    DECLARE @seconds bigint

    SET @hours = DATEDIFF(HOUR, @starting_date, @ending_date)
    SET @starting_date = DATEADD(HOUR, @hours, @starting_date)
    SET @ticks = @hours * 36000000000
    SET @seconds = DATEDIFF(SECOND, @starting_date, @ending_date)
    SET @starting_date = DATEADD(SECOND, @seconds, @starting_date)
    SET @ticks = @ticks + @seconds * 10000000
    SET @ticks = @ticks + CONVERT(bigint, DATEDIFF(NANOSECOND, @starting_date, @ending_date)) / 100

    RETURN @ticks
END
GO

--- BEGIN Test Harness ---
SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @dateTimeOffsetMinValue datetimeoffset
DECLARE @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue datetimeoffset
DECLARE @timeSpanMinValueString varchar(26)
DECLARE @timeSpanZeroString varchar(26)
DECLARE @timeSpanMaxValueString varchar(26)
DECLARE @timeSpanMinValueTicks bigint
DECLARE @timeSpanZeroTicks bigint
DECLARE @timeSpanMaxValueTicks bigint
DECLARE @dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks bigint
DECLARE @dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks bigint

SET @dateTimeOffsetMinValue = '0001-01-01T00:00:00.0000000+00:00'
SET @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue = '9999-12-31T23:59:59.9999999+00:00'
SET @timeSpanMinValueString = '-10675199.02:48:05.4775808'
SET @timeSpanZeroString = '00:00:00'
SET @timeSpanMaxValueString = '10675199.02:48:05.4775807'
SET @timeSpanMinValueTicks = -9223372036854775808
SET @timeSpanZeroTicks = 0
SET @timeSpanMaxValueTicks = 9223372036854775807
SET @dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks = 3155378975999999999
SET @dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks = -3155378975999999999

-- TimeSpan Conversion Tests
PRINT 'Testing TimeSpan conversions...'

DECLARE @convertToTimeSpanStringMinTicksResult varchar(26)
DECLARE @convertFromTimeSpanStringMinTimeSpanResult bigint
DECLARE @convertToTimeSpanStringZeroTicksResult varchar(26)
DECLARE @convertFromTimeSpanStringZeroTimeSpanResult bigint
DECLARE @convertToTimeSpanStringMaxTicksResult varchar(26)
DECLARE @convertFromTimeSpanStringMaxTimeSpanResult bigint

SET @convertToTimeSpanStringMinTicksResult = dbo.ConvertToTimeSpanString(@timeSpanMinValueTicks)
SET @convertFromTimeSpanStringMinTimeSpanResult = dbo.ConvertFromTimeSpanString(@timeSpanMinValueString)
SET @convertToTimeSpanStringZeroTicksResult = dbo.ConvertToTimeSpanString(@timeSpanZeroTicks)
SET @convertFromTimeSpanStringZeroTimeSpanResult = dbo.ConvertFromTimeSpanString(@timeSpanZeroString)
SET @convertToTimeSpanStringMaxTicksResult = dbo.ConvertToTimeSpanString(@timeSpanMaxValueTicks)
SET @convertFromTimeSpanStringMaxTimeSpanResult = dbo.ConvertFromTimeSpanString(@timeSpanMaxValueString)

-- Test Results
SELECT 'Convert to TimeSpan String from Ticks (Minimum)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertToTimeSpanStringMinTicksResult = @timeSpanMinValueString
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @timeSpanMinValueTicks AS [Ticks]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), NULL) AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertToTimeSpanStringMinTicksResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanMinValueString) AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Convert from TimeSpan String to Ticks (Minimum)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertFromTimeSpanStringMinTimeSpanResult = @timeSpanMinValueTicks
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , NULL AS [Ticks]
    , @timeSpanMinValueString AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertFromTimeSpanStringMinTimeSpanResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanMinValueTicks) AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Convert to TimeSpan String from Ticks (Zero)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertToTimeSpanStringZeroTicksResult = @timeSpanZeroString
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @timeSpanZeroTicks AS [Ticks]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), NULL) AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertToTimeSpanStringZeroTicksResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanZeroString) AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Convert from TimeSpan String to Ticks (Zero)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertFromTimeSpanStringZeroTimeSpanResult = @timeSpanZeroTicks
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , NULL AS [Ticks]
    , @timeSpanZeroString AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertFromTimeSpanStringZeroTimeSpanResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanZeroTicks) AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Convert to TimeSpan String from Ticks (Maximum)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertToTimeSpanStringMaxTicksResult = @timeSpanMaxValueString
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @timeSpanMaxValueTicks AS [Ticks]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), NULL) AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertToTimeSpanStringMaxTicksResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanMaxValueString) AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Convert from TimeSpan String to Ticks (Maximum)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @convertFromTimeSpanStringMaxTimeSpanResult = @timeSpanMaxValueTicks
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , NULL AS [Ticks]
    , @timeSpanMaxValueString AS [TimeSpan String]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @convertFromTimeSpanStringMaxTimeSpanResult) AS [Actual Result]
    , CONVERT(varchar(26), @timeSpanMaxValueTicks) AS [Expected Result]

-- Ticks Date Add Test
PRINT 'Testing DateAddTicks...'

DECLARE @DateAddTicksPositiveTicksResult datetimeoffset
DECLARE @DateAddTicksZeroTicksResult datetimeoffset
DECLARE @DateAddTicksNegativeTicksResult datetimeoffset

SET @DateAddTicksPositiveTicksResult = dbo.DateAddTicks(@dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks, @dateTimeOffsetMinValue)
SET @DateAddTicksZeroTicksResult = dbo.DateAddTicks(@timeSpanZeroTicks, @dateTimeOffsetMinValue)
SET @DateAddTicksNegativeTicksResult = dbo.DateAddTicks(@dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks, @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue)

-- Test Results
SELECT 'Date Add with Ticks Test (Positive)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @DateAddTicksPositiveTicksResult = @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks AS [Ticks]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Starting Date]
    , @DateAddTicksPositiveTicksResult AS [Actual Result]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Date Add with Ticks Test (Zero)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @DateAddTicksZeroTicksResult = @dateTimeOffsetMinValue
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @timeSpanZeroTicks AS [Ticks]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Starting Date]
    , @DateAddTicksZeroTicksResult AS [Actual Result]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Date Add with Ticks Test (Negative)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @DateAddTicksNegativeTicksResult = @dateTimeOffsetMinValue
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks AS [Ticks]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue AS [Starting Date]
    , @DateAddTicksNegativeTicksResult AS [Actual Result]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Expected Result]

-- Ticks Date Diff Test
PRINT 'Testing Date Diff Ticks...'

DECLARE @dateDiffTicksMinMaxResult bigint
DECLARE @dateDiffTicksMaxMinResult bigint

SET @dateDiffTicksMinMaxResult = dbo.DateDiffTicks(@dateTimeOffsetMinValue, @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue)
SET @dateDiffTicksMaxMinResult = dbo.DateDiffTicks(@dateTimeOffsetMaxValue, @dateTimeOffsetMinValue)

-- Test Results
SELECT 'Date Difference in Ticks Test (Min, Max)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @dateDiffTicksMinMaxResult = @dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Starting Date]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue AS [Ending Date]
    , @dateDiffTicksMinMaxResult AS [Actual Result]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinMaxDiffTicks AS [Expected Result]
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Date Difference in Ticks Test (Max, Min)' AS Test
    , CASE 
        WHEN @dateDiffTicksMaxMinResult = @dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks
            THEN 'Pass'
        ELSE 'Fail'
        END AS [Test Status]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxValue AS [Starting Date]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMinValue AS [Ending Date]
    , @dateDiffTicksMaxMinResult AS [Actual Result]
    , @dateTimeOffsetMaxMinDiffTicks AS [Expected Result]

PRINT 'Tests Complete.'
GO
--- END Test Harness ---
| |
1

Now, with EF Core you can convert data type transparently in your AppDbContext

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
      // i.e. Store TimeSpan as string (custom)
      modelBuilder
        .Entity<YourClass>()
        .Property(x => x.YourTimeSpan)
        .HasConversion(
            timeSpan => timeSpan.ToString(), // To DB
            timeSpanString => TimeSpan.Parse(timeSpanString) // From DB
        );

    // i.e. Store TimeSpan as string (using TimeSpanToStringConverter)
    modelBuilder
        .Entity<YourClass>()
        .Property(x => x.YourTimeSpan)
        .HasConversion(new TimeSpanToStringConverter());

      // i.e. Store TimeSpan as number of ticks (custom)
      modelBuilder
        .Entity<YourClass>()
        .Property(x => x.YourTimeSpan)
        .HasConversion(
            timeSpan => timeSpan.Ticks, // To DB
            timeSpanString => TimeSpan.FromTicks(timeSpanString) // From DB
        );

    // i.e. Store TimeSpan as number of ticks (using TimeSpanToTicksConverter)
    modelBuilder
        .Entity<YourClass>()
        .Property(x => x.YourTimeSpan)
        .HasConversion(new TimeSpanToTicksConverter());
}
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