624

I'm having a problem centering an element that has the attribute position set to absolute. Does anyone know why the images are not centered?

body {
  text-align: center;
}

#slideshowWrapper {
  margin-top: 50px;
  text-align: center;
}

ul#slideshow {
  list-style: none;
  position: relative;
  margin: auto;
}

ul#slideshow li {
  position: absolute;
}

ul#slideshow li img {
  border: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 4px;
  height: 450px;
}
<body>
  <div id="slideshowWrapper">
    <ul id="slideshow">
      <li><img src="img/dummy1.JPG" alt="Dummy 1" /></li>
      <li><img src="img/piano_unlicened.JPG" alt="Dummy 2" /></li>
    </ul>
  </div>
</body>

  • 3
    you need to give ul#slideshow a fixed width... – ptriek Dec 14 '11 at 16:48

25 Answers 25

1086
position: absolute;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
left: 0;
right: 0;
  • 20
    This is a much cleaner answer than the rest! Are there any caveats? – sbichenko Nov 12 '13 at 18:15
  • 8
    Smartest answer. I have just checked it and it works on all browsers. It does not work on IE8 but it works on IE>=9 – Roger Dec 11 '13 at 9:43
  • 12
    Be sure to test in IE, this trick does not work if the element has a 'max-width' set in IE9 – aphax Jan 22 '14 at 11:29
  • 32
    I personally prefer the syntax "margin: 0 auto; left: 0; right: 0;" – Hector Ordonez Mar 15 '14 at 14:07
  • 52
    This quite simply does not work, unless a width is set. It might APPEAR to work if you have text-align:center on the parent and don't have a background on the absolute-positioned element, but put a background on it and you'll see it's actually taking the full width. The translateX(-50%) answer is the correct one. – Codemonkey Mar 23 '16 at 15:29
530

Without knowing the width/height of the positioned1 element, it is still possible to align it as follows:

EXAMPLE HERE

.child {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;  /* position the top  edge of the element at the middle of the parent */
    left: 50%; /* position the left edge of the element at the middle of the parent */

    transform: translate(-50%, -50%); /* This is a shorthand of
                                         translateX(-50%) and translateY(-50%) */
}

It's worth noting that CSS Transform is supported in IE9 and above. (Vendor prefixes omitted for brevity)


Explanation

Adding top/left of 50% moves the top/left margin edge of the element to the middle of the parent, and translate() function with the (negative) value of -50% moves the element by the half of its size. Hence the element will be positioned at the middle.

This is because a percentage value on top/left properties is relative to the height/width of the parent element (which is creating a containing block).

While a percentage value on translate() transform function is relative to width/height of the element itself (Actually it refers to the size of bounding box).

For unidirectional alignment, go with translateX(-50%) or translateY(-50%) instead.


1. An element with a position other than static. I.e. relative, absolute, fixed values.

  • 60
    This should be the top answer!! – Chris Pine Sep 26 '14 at 5:49
  • 3
    Fantastic! Best of the lot! – Bhargav Ponnapalli Jan 25 '15 at 15:41
  • 6
    This is the correct way, welcome to 2015! – ShayneStatzell Apr 21 '15 at 17:46
  • 3
    I have searched everywhere for an answer to this and a good explanation. This is the best answer out there and a great explanation too! Thanks. – Mike Oct 14 '15 at 7:29
  • 4
    Horizontal centering: position: absolute; left: 50%; transform: translateX(-50%);, vertical centering: position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%);. – Константин Ван Feb 17 '16 at 3:21
178

Centering something absolutely positioned is rather convoluted in CSS.

ul#slideshow li {
    position: absolute;
    left:50%;
    margin-left:-20px;

}

Change margin-left to (negative) half the width of the element you are trying to center.

  • 5
    When testing this it doesn't work when images are different sizes, and they still stack up on one another – Ryan Gibbons Dec 14 '11 at 18:57
  • 3
    Too hack-ish (as it almost always turns out with css). But awesome! :-) – Dr.Kameleon Dec 7 '13 at 9:35
  • 1
    I was tempted by the cleverness of some other answers, but only this one was reliable for me. – Chris Schiffhauer Apr 2 '14 at 1:02
  • I had the same issue like Ryan, so I tried the second answer suggested by "baaroz" and it worked for me!!! and it support different resolutions also, since my main DIV have width in % and not PX – UID Apr 11 '14 at 19:05
  • This isn't actually centered. This is more positioned to the right – Artsicle Jan 10 '17 at 20:54
78

Div vertically and horizontally aligned center

top: 0;
bottom: 0;
margin: auto;
position: absolute;
left: 0;
right: 0;

Note : Elements should have width and height to be set

  • 1
    I don't know why this doesn't get more up voted. Works in all browsers including mobile browsers as far as I can tell. Seams more reliable in terms of support. It's simple, easy and clean... – David Martins Aug 4 '15 at 9:15
  • 1
    This is a better answer. It only requires one div to make and has more use cases than calling left:50%;, top:50%; like the solution with 69+ votes – Ian S Aug 7 '15 at 10:27
  • the best answer so far, any one coming here should check it ! – Abdo Adel Dec 7 '15 at 12:30
  • 3
    The element also needs a height set for this to work. – alexbooots Dec 8 '15 at 22:50
  • 1
    Awesome answer solved my problem – MD Shahrouq Apr 2 '18 at 7:00
52

A simple CSS trick, just add:

width: 100%;
text-align: center;

This works on both images and text.

47

If you want to center an absolute element

#div {
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    width:300px; /* Assign a value */
    height:500px; /* Assign a value */
    margin:auto;
}

If you want a container to be centered left to right, but not with top to bottom

#div {
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    width:300px; /* Assign a value */
    height:500px; /* Assign a value */
    margin:auto;
}

If you want a container to be centered top to bottom, regardless of being left to right

#div {
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    width:300px; /* Assign a value */
    height:500px; /* Assign a value */
    margin:auto;
}

Update as of December 15, 2015

Well I learnt this another new trick few months ago. Assuming that you have a relative parent element.

Here goes your absolute element.

.absolute-element { 
    position:absolute; 
    top:50%; 
    left:50%; 
    transform:translate(-50%, -50%); 
    width:50%; /* You can specify ANY width values here */ 
}

With this, I think it's a better answer than my old solution. Since you don't have to specify width AND height. This one it adapts the content of the element itself.

31

To center a “position: absolute” element.

.your-element {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  text-align: center; // or this ->  margin: 0 auto;
}
  • perfect solution. thanks – danbord Oct 21 at 15:14
30

This worked for me:

position: absolute;
left: 50%;
transform: translateX(-50%);
26

to center a a position:absolute attribute you need to set left:50% and margin-left: -50% of the width of the div.

<!-- for horizontal -->
<style>
div.center{
 width:200px;
 left:50%;
 margin-left:-100px;
 position:absolute;
}
</style>


<body>
 <div class='center'>
  should be centered horizontaly
 </div>
</body>

for vertical center absolute you need to do the same thing bud not with left just with top. ( NOTE: html and body must have min-height 100%; )

<!-- for vertical -->
<style>
 body,html{
  min-height:100%;
 }
 div.center{
  height:200px;
  top:50%;
  margin-top:-100px;
  position:absolute;
 }
</style>

<body>
 <div class='center'>
  should be centered verticaly
 </div>
</body>

and can be combined for both

   <!-- for both -->
 <style>
 body,html{
  min-height:100%;
 }
 div.center{
  width:200px;
  height:50px
  left:50%;
  top:50%;
  margin-left:-100px;
  margin-top:-25px;
  position:absolute;
 }
</style>


<body>
 <div class='center'>
  should be centered
 </div>
</body>
16
    <div class="centered_content"> content </div>
    <style type="text/css">
    .centered_content {
       text-align: center;
       position: absolute;
       left: 0;
       right: 0;
    }
    </style>

see demo on: http://jsfiddle.net/MohammadDayeh/HrZLC/

text-align: center; works with a position: absolute element when adding left: 0; right: 0;

  • 2
    Please provide some sort of commentary or rationale behind why this code works. Code answers themselves will inevitably get flagged for deletion. – rayryeng - Reinstate Monica May 24 '14 at 2:11
14

The simpler, the best:

img {
            top: 0;
            bottom: 0;
            left: 0;
            right: 0;
            margin: auto auto;
            position: absolute;
}

Then you need to insert your img tag into a tag that sports position:relative property, as follows:

<div style="width:256px; height: 256px; position:relative;">
      <img src="photo.jpg"/>
</div>
7

If you don't know the width of the element you can use this code:

<body>
<div style="position: absolute; left: 50%;">
    <div style="position: relative; left: -50%; border: dotted red 1px;">
        I am some centered shrink-to-fit content! <br />
        tum te tum
    </div>
</div>

Demo at fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/wrh7a21r/

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/a/1777282/1136132

  • @NabiK.A.Z. this example is useful if you don't know the width of the element. In your example you set a width to the div. – joseantgv Jun 13 '16 at 9:47
7

probably the shortest

position:absolute;
left:0;right:0;top:0;bottom:0;
margin:0 auto;
5

enter image description here

I'm not sure what you want to accomplish, but in this case just adding width: 100%; to your ul#slideshow li will do the trick.

Explanation

The img tags are inline-block elements. This means that they flow inline like text, but also have a width and height like block elements. In your css there are two text-align: center; rules applied to the <body> and to the #slideshowWrapper (which is redundant btw) this makes all inline and inline-block child elements to be centered in their closest block elements, in your code these are li tags. All block elements have width: 100% if they are the static flow (position: static;), which is default. The problem is that when you tell li tags to be position: absolute;, you take them out of normal static flow, and this causes them to shrink their size to just fit their inner content, in other words they kind of "lose" their width: 100% property.

5

Using left: calc(50% - Wpx/2); where W is the width of the element works for me.

  • How do you determine W? – Purplejacket Jan 13 '17 at 2:44
  • He said "an image" - ideally when doing images for the web you're supposed to make the image in the size that you're going to use it (rather than resize it) to avoid unnecessary weight (if you make a large image small) or fuzziness (if you make a small image big). - You can use "imageElement.naturalHeight" and "imageElement.naturalWidth" if you're using jQuery and then style dynamically too, but that's getting a bit complicated. To be fair, many of the other answers also require you to know the width of the image for their technique to work. – Julix Jan 13 '17 at 19:55
  • if you are actually unclear on how to get W though, in Chrome you can use CTRL+Shift+i (developer tools), then CTRL+Shift+C (inspect mode) to hover over elements and see how wide things are. You can also just decide how wide you want it to be and add "width: Wpx" to your css. – Julix Jan 13 '17 at 19:57
4

Your images are not centered because your list items are not centered; only their text is centered. You can achieve the positioning you want by either centering the entire list or centering the images within the list.

A revised version of your code can be found at the bottom. In my revision I center both the list and the images within it.

The truth is you cannot center an element that has a position set to absolute.

But this behavior can be imitated!

Note: These instructions will work with any DOM block element, not just img.

  1. Surround your image with a div or other tag (in your case a li).

    <div class="absolute-div">
      <img alt="my-image" src="#">
    </div>
    

    Note: The names given to these elements are not special.

  2. Alter your css or scss to give the div absolute positioning and your image centered.

    .absolute-div {
      position: absolute;
    
      width: 100%; 
      // Range to be centered over. 
    
      // If this element's parent is the body then 100% = the window's width
    
      // Note: You can apply additional top/bottom and left/right attributes
      // i.e. - top: 200px; left: 200px;
    
      // Test for desired positioning.
    }
    
    .absolute-div img {
      width: 500px;
      // Note: Setting a width is crucial for margin: auto to work.
    
      margin: 0 auto;
    }
    

And there you have it! Your img should be centered!

Your code:

Try this out:

body
{
  text-align : center;
}

#slideshow
{
  list-style : none;
  width      : 800px;
  // alter to taste

  margin     : 50px auto 0;
}

#slideshow li
{
  position : absolute;
}

#slideshow img
{
  border  : 1px solid #CCC;
  padding : 4px;
  height  : 500px;
  width   : auto;
  // This sets the width relative to your set height.

  // Setting a width is required for the margin auto attribute below. 

  margin  : 0 auto;
}
<ul id="slideshow">
    <li><img src="http://lorempixel.com/500/500/nature/" alt="Dummy 1" /></li>
    <li><img src="http://lorempixel.com/500/500/nature/" alt="Dummy 2" /></li>
</ul>

I hope this was helpful. Good luck!

3

An absolute object inside a relative object is relative to its parent, the problem here is that you need a static width for the container #slideshowWrapper , and the rest of the solution is like the other users says

body {
    text-align: center;
}

#slideshowWrapper {
    margin-top: 50px;
    text-align:center;
    width: 500px;
}

ul#slideshow {
    list-style: none;
    position: relative;
    margin: auto;
}

ul#slideshow li {
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
}

ul#slideshow li img {
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    padding: 4px;
    height: 450px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/ejRTU/10/

  • Your fiddle as the two images stacking up one one another. – Ryan Gibbons Dec 14 '11 at 17:30
3

Here is easy and best solution for center element with “position: absolute”

 body,html{
  min-height:100%;
 }
 
 div.center{
 width:200px;
 left:50%;
 margin-left:-100px;/*this is 50% value for width of the element*/
 position:absolute;
 background:#ddd;
 border:1px solid #999;
 height:100px;
 text-align:center
 }
 
 
<style>

</style>

<body>
 <div class='center'>
  should be centered verticaly
 </div>
</body>

2

You can try this way :

* { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
#body { height: 100vh; width: 100vw; position: relative; 
        text-align: center; 
        background-image: url('https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/96/2d/ff/962dff2247ad680c542622e20f44a645.jpg'); 
         background-size: cover; background-repeat: no-repeat; }
.text { position: absolute; top: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; right: 0; height:100px; 
        display: inline-block; margin: auto; z-index: 999999; }
<html>
<body>
	<div id="body" class="container-fluid">
	  <!--Background-->
	    <!--Text-->
		  <div class="text">
		    <p>Random</p>
		  </div>	  
	</div>
</body>
</html>

1

Position absolute takes it out of the flow, and places it at 0x0 to the parent ( Last block element to have a position absolute or position relative ).

I'm not sure what exactly you what you are trying to accomplish, It might be best to set the li to a position:relative and that will center them. Given your current CSS

Check out http://jsfiddle.net/rtgibbons/ejRTU/ to play with it

  • :/ at the end is almost the same solution as yours... < Up vote – eveevans Dec 14 '11 at 17:44
1
#parent
{
    position : relative;
    height: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
    padding-bottom: 56.25% /* images with aspect ratio: 16:9  */
}

img 
{
    height: auto!important;
    width: auto!important;
    min-height: 100%;
    min-width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    display: block;
    /*  */
    top: -9999px;
    bottom: -9999px;
    left: -9999px;
    right: -9999px;
    margin: auto;
}

I don't remember where I saw the centering method listed above, using negative top, right, bottom, left values. For me, this tehnique is the best, in most situations.

When I use the combination from above, the image behaves like a background-image with the following settings:

background-position: 50% 50%;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-size: cover;

More details about the first example can be found here:
Maintain the aspect ratio of a div with CSS

1

Or you can now use flex box with postion absolute:

.parent {
    position: relative;
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
}

.child {
    position: absolute;
}
0

What seems to be happening is there are two solutions; centered using margins and centered using position. Both work fine, but if you want to absolute position an element relative to this centered element, you need to use the absolute position method, because the absolute position of the second element defaults to the first parent that is positioned. Like so:

<!-- CENTERED USING MARGIN -->
<div style="width:300px; height:100px; border: 1px solid #000; margin:20px auto; text- align:center;">
    <p style="line-height:4;">width: 300 px; margin: 0 auto</p>
    <div style="position:absolute; width:100px; height:100px; background-color:#ff0000; top:-20px; left:0px;">
        <p style="line-height:4;">Absolute</p>
    </div>
</div>

<!-- CENTERED USING POSITION -->
<div style="position:absolute; left:50%; width:300px; height:100px; border: 1px solid #000; margin:20px 0 20px -150px; text-align:center;">
    <p style="line-height:2;">width:300px; position: absolute; left: 50%; margin-left:-150px;</p>
    <div style="position:absolute; width:100px; height:100px; background-color:#ff0000; top:0px; left:-105px;">
        <p style="line-height:4;">Absolute</p>
    </div>
</div>

Until I'd read this posting, using the margin:0 auto technique, to build a menu to the left of my content I had to build a same-width column to the right to balance it out. Not pretty. Thanks!

0

Use margin-left: x%; where x is the half of the width of the element.

-1

html, body, ul, li, img {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  margin: 0px;  
  padding: 0px;  
}

#slideshowWrapper {
  width: 25rem;
  height: auto;
  position: relative;
  
  margin-top: 50px;
  border: 3px solid black;
}

ul {
  list-style: none;
  border: 3px solid blue;  
}

li {
  /* center horizontal */
  position: relative;
  left: 0;
  top: 50%;
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 18px;
  /* center horizontal */
  
  border: 3px solid red; 
}

img {
  border: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 4px;
  //width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
}
<body>
  <div id="slideshowWrapper">
    <ul id="slideshow">
      <li><img src="http://via.placeholder.com/350x150" alt="Dummy 1" /></li>
      <li><img src="http://via.placeholder.com/140x100" alt="Dummy 2" /></li>
      <li><img src="http://via.placeholder.com/200x100" alt="Dummy 3" /></li>      
    </ul>
  </div>
</body>

  • 1
    This answer only has code. While it may be correct, it should have an accompanying explanation as to why the code answers the OP's question. Code is not "self explanitory" on Stack Exchnge. – JBH Oct 28 '17 at 15:49

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