With the new range-based for loop we can write code like

for(auto x: Y) {}

Which IMO is a huge improvement from (for ex.)

for(std::vector<int>::iterator x=Y.begin(); x!=Y.end(); ++x) {}

Can it be used to loop over two simultaneous loops, like Pythons zip function? For those unfamiliar with Python, the code:

Y1 = [1,2,3]
Y2 = [4,5,6,7]
for x1,x2 in zip(Y1,Y2):
    print x1,x2

Gives as output (1,4) (2,5) (3,6)

  • Range-based for can only be used with one variable, so no. If you wanted to access two values at a time, you'd have to use something like std::pair – Seth Carnegie Dec 14 '11 at 20:17
  • 4
    @SethCarnegie: not directly, but you could come up with a zip() function that returns tuples and iterate over the list of tuples. – André Caron Dec 14 '11 at 20:18
  • 2
    @AndréCaron you're right, my "no" was meant to say that you can't use two variables, not that you can't iterate over two containers at once. – Seth Carnegie Dec 14 '11 at 20:20
  • Clearly for(;;) can get this behavior, albeit long-hand, so is the question really: Is it possible to for "auto" over two objects at once? – user166390 Dec 14 '11 at 20:21
  • In a future revision (hopefully C++17), an overhaul of the STL will include ranges. Then view::zip may provide the preferred solution. – John McFarlane Jun 10 '15 at 21:29

13 Answers 13

up vote 73 down vote accepted

Warning: boost::zip_iterator and boost::combine as of Boost 1.63.0 (2016 Dec 26) will cause undefined behavior if the length of the input containers are not the same (it may crash or iterate beyond the end).


Starting from Boost 1.56.0 (2014 Aug 7) you could use boost::combine (the function exists in earlier versions but undocumented):

#include <boost/range/combine.hpp>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <string>

int main() {
    std::vector<int> a {4, 5, 6};
    double b[] = {7, 8, 9};
    std::list<std::string> c {"a", "b", "c"};
    for (auto tup : boost::combine(a, b, c, a)) {    // <---
        int x, w;
        double y;
        std::string z;
        boost::tie(x, y, z, w) = tup;
        printf("%d %g %s %d\n", x, y, z.c_str(), w);
    }
}

This would print

4 7 a 4
5 8 b 5
6 9 c 6

In earlier versions, you could define a range yourself like this:

#include <boost/iterator/zip_iterator.hpp>
#include <boost/range.hpp>

template <typename... T>
auto zip(T&&... containers) -> boost::iterator_range<boost::zip_iterator<decltype(boost::make_tuple(std::begin(containers)...))>>
{
    auto zip_begin = boost::make_zip_iterator(boost::make_tuple(std::begin(containers)...));
    auto zip_end = boost::make_zip_iterator(boost::make_tuple(std::end(containers)...));
    return boost::make_iterator_range(zip_begin, zip_end);
}

The usage is the same.

  • 1
    could you use this for sorting? i.e. std::sort(zip(a.begin(),...),zip(a.end(),...),[](tup a, tup b){a.get<0>() > b.get<0>()}); ? – gnzlbg Dec 13 '12 at 9:35
  • @gnzlbg: No you can't. – kennytm Dec 13 '12 at 12:08
  • I would be tempted by optional elements for past-the-end iteration possibilities... – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jun 25 '13 at 22:25
  • 3
    Any chance you can do this with std::make_tuple and std::tie ? I was trying to use this while minimizing the boost dependency but I couldn't make it work. – Carneiro Jul 11 '14 at 5:45

You can use a solution based on boost::zip_iterator. Make a phony container class maintaining references to your containers, and which return zip_iterator from the begin and end member functions. Now you can write

for (auto p: zip(c1, c2)) { ... }

Example implementation (please test):

#include <iterator>
#include <boost/iterator/zip_iterator.hpp>

template <typename C1, typename C2>
class zip_container
{
    C1* c1; C2* c2;

    typedef boost::tuple<
        decltype(std::begin(*c1)), 
        decltype(std::begin(*c2))
    > tuple;

public:
    zip_container(C1& c1, C2& c2) : c1(&c1), c2(&c2) {}

    typedef boost::zip_iterator<tuple> iterator;

    iterator begin() const
    {
         return iterator(std::begin(*c1), std::begin(*c2));
    }

    iterator end() const
    {
         return iterator(std::end(*c1), std::end(*c2));
    }
};

template <typename C1, typename C2>
zip_container<C1, C2> zip(C1& c1, C2& c2)
{
    return zip_container<C1, C2>(c1, c2);
}

I leave the variadic version as an excellent exercise to the reader.

  • 3
    +1: Boost.Range should probably incorporate this. In fact, I'll drop them a feature request on this. – Nicol Bolas Dec 14 '11 at 20:50
  • 1
    @NicolBolas: You do well. This should be quite easy to implement with boost::iterator_range + boost::zip_iterator, even the variadic version. – Alexandre C. Dec 14 '11 at 20:53
  • 1
    I believe this will never terminate (and have undefined behaviour) if the ranges are not the same length. – Jonathan Wakely Jan 17 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    boost::zip_iterator does not work with ranges of different lengths – Jonathan Wakely Apr 21 '13 at 15:19
  • 1
    This should also work even in clean c++03 with pair instead of tuple. Still this wil also create problems when the lengths are not equal. Something might be done with the end() by taking the corresponding end() of the smallest container. This seems to be in the spec as it was in OPs question. – Paul Oct 29 '15 at 15:15

See <redi/zip.h> for a zip function which works with range-base for and accepts any number of ranges, which can be rvalues or lvalues and can be different lengths (iteration will stop at the end of the shortest range).

std::vector<int> vi{ 0, 2, 4 };
std::vector<std::string> vs{ "1", "3", "5", "7" };
for (auto i : redi::zip(vi, vs))
  std::cout << i.get<0>() << ' ' << i.get<1>() << ' ';

Prints 0 1 2 3 4 5

  • 2
    you can also use boost/tuple/tuple_io.hpp to cout << i; – kirill_igum Oct 30 '14 at 2:51
  • This is what worked for me. However, in my code I had to use the equivalent of boost::get<0>(i) and boost::get<1>(i). I'm not sure why the original sample could not be adapted directly, it might have to do with the fact that my code takes constant references to containers. – YitzikC Dec 6 '16 at 12:58

So I wrote this zip before when I was bored, I decided to post it because it's different than the others in that it doesn't use boost and looks more like the c++ stdlib.

template <typename Iterator>
    void advance_all (Iterator & iterator) {
        ++iterator;
    }
template <typename Iterator, typename ... Iterators>
    void advance_all (Iterator & iterator, Iterators& ... iterators) {
        ++iterator;
        advance_all(iterators...);
    } 
template <typename Function, typename Iterator, typename ... Iterators>
    Function zip (Function func, Iterator begin, 
            Iterator end, 
            Iterators ... iterators)
    {
        for(;begin != end; ++begin, advance_all(iterators...))
            func(*begin, *(iterators)... );
        //could also make this a tuple
        return func;
    }

Example use:

int main () {
    std::vector<int> v1{1,2,3};
    std::vector<int> v2{3,2,1};
    std::vector<float> v3{1.2,2.4,9.0};
    std::vector<float> v4{1.2,2.4,9.0};
     zip (
            [](int i,int j,float k,float l){
                std::cout << i << " " << j << " " << k << " " << l << std::endl;
            },
            v1.begin(),v1.end(),v2.begin(),v3.begin(),v4.begin());
}
  • 3
    You should check if any of the iterators is at the end. – Xeo Sep 12 '13 at 18:31
  • 1
    @Xeo all the ranges should be the same size as the first or greater – aaronman Sep 12 '13 at 18:39
  • Can you explain how [](int i,int j,float k,float l) works? Is this a lambda function? – Hooked Sep 12 '13 at 18:49
  • @Hooked yeah it's a lambda, it basically works just std::for_each but you can use an arbitrary number of ranges, the parameters in the lambda depend on how many iterators you give the function – aaronman Sep 12 '13 at 18:52
  • 1
    A common need is to zip ranges of different size, or even with infinite ranges. – Xeo Sep 12 '13 at 19:23

With range-v3:

#include <range/v3/all.hpp>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

namespace ranges {
    template <class T, class U>
    std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, common_pair<T, U> const& p)
    {
      return os << '(' << p.first << ", " << p.second << ')';
    }
}

using namespace ranges::v3;

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a {4, 5, 6};
    double b[] = {7, 8, 9};
    std::cout << view::zip(a, b) << std::endl; 
}

The output:

[(4, 7),(5, 8),(6, 9)]

  • 1
    Man, I wish this was in C++ officially already! – einpoklum Apr 26 at 16:08

I ran into this same question independently and didn't like the syntax of any of the above. So, I have a short header file that essentially does the same as the boost zip_iterator but has a few macros to make the syntax more palatable to me:

https://github.com/cshelton/zipfor

For example you can do

vector<int> a {1,2,3};
array<string,3> b {"hello","there","coders"};

zipfor(i,s eachin a,b)
    cout << i << " => " << s << endl;

The main syntactic sugar is that I can name the elements from each container. I also include a "mapfor" that does the same, but for maps (to name the ".first" and ".second" of the element).

  • This is neat! Can it take an arbitrary number of arguments are all those limited by your clever templating to a finite number? – Hooked Jan 10 '14 at 2:42
  • Currently it only handles up to 9 parallel containers. That would be simple to advance. While variadic macros allow for a single "zipfor" macro to handle different numbers of parameters, one still has to code up a separate macro for each (to be dispatched to). See groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/comp.std.c/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/15847837/… – cshelton Jan 10 '14 at 17:25
  • Does it handle arguments of different size well? (as described in the OP) – coyotte508 May 27 '16 at 9:15
  • @coyotte508, it assumes that the first container has the fewest number of elements (and ignores the extra elements in other containers). It would be easy to modify to not make this assumption, but that would slow it down (currently it is no slower than hand-written) when the number of elements match. – cshelton May 27 '16 at 16:26
// declare a, b
BOOST_FOREACH(boost::tie(a, b), boost::combine(list_of_a, list_of_b)){
    // your code here.
}

If you like operator overloading, here are three possibilities. The first two are using std::pair<> and std::tuple<>, respectively, as iterators; the third extends this to range-based for. Note that not everyone will like these definitions of the operators, so it's best to keep them in a separate namespace and have a using namespace in the functions (not files!) where you'd like to use these.

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <vector>
#include <tuple>

// put these in namespaces so we don't pollute global
namespace pair_iterators
{
    template<typename T1, typename T2>
    std::pair<T1, T2> operator++(std::pair<T1, T2>& it)
    {
        ++it.first;
        ++it.second;
        return it;
    }
}

namespace tuple_iterators
{
    // you might want to make this generic (via param pack)
    template<typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
    auto operator++(std::tuple<T1, T2, T3>& it)
    {
        ++( std::get<0>( it ) );
        ++( std::get<1>( it ) );
        ++( std::get<2>( it ) );
        return it;
    }

    template<typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
    auto operator*(const std::tuple<T1, T2, T3>& it)
    {
        return std::tie( *( std::get<0>( it ) ),
                         *( std::get<1>( it ) ),
                         *( std::get<2>( it ) ) );
    }

    // needed due to ADL-only lookup
    template<typename... Args>
    struct tuple_c
    {
        std::tuple<Args...> containers;
    };

    template<typename... Args>
    auto tie_c( const Args&... args )
    {
        tuple_c<Args...> ret = { std::tie(args...) };
        return ret;
    }

    template<typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
    auto begin( const tuple_c<T1, T2, T3>& c )
    {
        return std::make_tuple( std::get<0>( c.containers ).begin(),
                                std::get<1>( c.containers ).begin(),
                                std::get<2>( c.containers ).begin() );
    }

    template<typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
    auto end( const tuple_c<T1, T2, T3>& c )
    {
        return std::make_tuple( std::get<0>( c.containers ).end(),
                                std::get<1>( c.containers ).end(),
                                std::get<2>( c.containers ).end() );
    }

    // implement cbegin(), cend() as needed
}

int main()
{
    using namespace pair_iterators;
    using namespace tuple_iterators;

    std::vector<double> ds = { 0.0, 0.1, 0.2 };
    std::vector<int   > is = {   1,   2,   3 };
    std::vector<char  > cs = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };

    // classical, iterator-style using pairs
    for( auto its  = std::make_pair(ds.begin(), is.begin()),
              end  = std::make_pair(ds.end(),   is.end()  ); its != end; ++its )
    {
        std::cout << "1. " << *(its.first ) + *(its.second) << " " << std::endl;
    }

    // classical, iterator-style using tuples
    for( auto its  = std::make_tuple(ds.begin(), is.begin(), cs.begin()),
              end  = std::make_tuple(ds.end(),   is.end(),   cs.end()  ); its != end; ++its )
    {
        std::cout << "2. " << *(std::get<0>(its)) + *(std::get<1>(its)) << " "
                           << *(std::get<2>(its)) << " " << std::endl;
    }

    // range for using tuples
    for( const auto& d_i_c : tie_c( ds, is, cs ) )
    {
        std::cout << "3. " << std::get<0>(d_i_c) + std::get<1>(d_i_c) << " "
                           << std::get<2>(d_i_c) << " " << std::endl;
    }
}

If you have a C++14 compliant compiler (e.g. gcc5) you can use zip provided in the cppitertools library by Ryan Haining, which looks really promising:

array<int,4> i{{1,2,3,4}};
vector<float> f{1.2,1.4,12.3,4.5,9.9};
vector<string> s{"i","like","apples","alot","dude"};
array<double,5> d{{1.2,1.2,1.2,1.2,1.2}};

for (auto&& e : zip(i,f,s,d)) {
    cout << std::get<0>(e) << ' '
         << std::get<1>(e) << ' '
         << std::get<2>(e) << ' '
         << std::get<3>(e) << '\n';
    std::get<1>(e)=2.2f; // modifies the underlying 'f' array
}

For a C++ stream processing library I'm writing I was looking for a solution that doesn't rely on third party libraries and works with an arbitrary number of containers. I ended up with this solution. It's similar to the accepted solution which uses boost (and also results in undefined behavior if the container lengths are not equal)

#include <utility>

namespace impl {

template <typename Iter, typename... Iters>
class zip_iterator {
public:
  using value_type = std::tuple<const typename Iter::value_type&,
                                const typename Iters::value_type&...>;

  zip_iterator(const Iter &head, const Iters&... tail)
      : head_(head), tail_(tail...) { }

  value_type operator*() const {
    return std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<const typename Iter::value_type&>(*head_), *tail_);
  }

  zip_iterator& operator++() {
    ++head_; ++tail_;
    return *this;
  }

  bool operator==(const zip_iterator &rhs) const {
    return head_ == rhs.head_ && tail_ == rhs.tail_;
  }

  bool operator!=(const zip_iterator &rhs) const {
    return !(*this == rhs);
  }

private:
  Iter head_;
  zip_iterator<Iters...> tail_;
};

template <typename Iter>
class zip_iterator<Iter> {
public:
  using value_type = std::tuple<const typename Iter::value_type&>;

  zip_iterator(const Iter &head) : head_(head) { }

  value_type operator*() const {
    return value_type(*head_);
  }

  zip_iterator& operator++() { ++head_; return *this; }

  bool operator==(const zip_iterator &rhs) const { return head_ == rhs.head_; }

  bool operator!=(const zip_iterator &rhs) const { return !(*this == rhs); }

private:
  Iter head_;
};

}  // namespace impl

template <typename Iter>
class seq {
public:
  using iterator = Iter;
  seq(const Iter &begin, const Iter &end) : begin_(begin), end_(end) { }
  iterator begin() const { return begin_; }
  iterator end() const { return end_; }
private:
  Iter begin_, end_;
};

/* WARNING: Undefined behavior if iterator lengths are different.
 */
template <typename... Seqs>
seq<impl::zip_iterator<typename Seqs::iterator...>>
zip(const Seqs&... seqs) {
  return seq<impl::zip_iterator<typename Seqs::iterator...>>(
      impl::zip_iterator<typename Seqs::iterator...>(std::begin(seqs)...),
      impl::zip_iterator<typename Seqs::iterator...>(std::end(seqs)...));
}
  • 1
    link broken... would be useful if the post shows how to use it e.g. main() ? – javaLover Feb 15 '17 at 11:33
  • @javaLover: you can use it the same way as cppitertools in @knedlsepp's answer. One notable difference is that with the above solution you can not modify the underlying containers as the operator* for seq::iterator returns a std::tuple of const references. – winnetou Dec 9 '17 at 13:34

Boost.Iterators has zip_iterator you can use (example's in the docs). It won't work with range for, but you can use std::for_each and a lambda.

  • Why won't it work with range-based for? Combine it with Boost.Range and you should be set. – Xeo Dec 14 '11 at 20:22
  • @Xeo: I don't know Range too well. I guess you could involve some boilerplate and make it work, but IMO just using for_each would be less hassle. – Cat Plus Plus Dec 14 '11 at 20:26
  • You mean something like this is not hassle: std::for_each(make_zip_iterator(make_tuple(Y1.begin(), Y2.begin())), make_zip_iterator(make_tuple(Y1.end(), Y2.end())), [](const tuple<int, int>& t){printf("%d %d\n", get<0>(t), get<1>(t)); });? – UncleBens Dec 14 '11 at 23:35
  • 2
    I should start a Lambda Does Not Make std::for_each Useful campaign. :) – UncleBens Dec 14 '11 at 23:39
  • 2
    @Xeo: This should probably be a separate question, but why oh why?? – UncleBens Dec 15 '11 at 16:55

std::transform cant do this trivially:

std::vector<int> a = {1,2,3,4,5};
std::vector<int> b = {1,2,3,4,5};
std::vector<int>c;
std::transform(a.begin(),a.end(), b.begin(),
               std::back_inserter(c),
               [](const auto& aa, const auto& bb)
               {
                   return aa*bb;
               });
for(auto cc:c)
    std::cout<<cc<<std::endl;

If the second sequence is shorter, my implementation seems to be giving default initialized values.

Here is a simple version that does not require boost. It won't be particularly efficient as it creates temporary values, and it does not generalise over containers other than lists, but it has no dependencies and it solves the most common case for zipping.

template<class L, class R>
std::list< std::pair<L,R> >  zip(std::list<L> left, std::list<R> right)
{
auto l = left.begin();
auto r = right.begin();
std::list< std::pair<L,R> > result;
  while( l!=left.end() && r!=right.end() )
    result.push_back( std::pair<L,R>( *(l++), *(r++) ) );
  return result;
}

Although the other versions are more flexible, often the point of using a list operator is make a simple one-liner. This version has the benefit that the common-case is simple.

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