52

I've a QMap object and I am trying to write its content to a file.

QMap<QString, QString> extensions;
//.. 

for(auto e : extensions)
{
  fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
}  

Why do I get: error: 'class QString' has no member named 'first' nor 'second'

Is e not of type QPair?

49

If you want the STL style with first and second, do this:

for(auto e : extensions.toStdMap())
{
  fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
}

If you want to use what Qt offers, do this:

for(auto e : extensions.keys())
{
  fout << e << "," << extensions.value(e) << '\n';
}
  • 47
    toStdMap() and keys() methods will copy entire contents of map or it's keys what is quite resourceful. I wonder why it is chosen as best answer and got so many votes – Dmitry Ilukhin Dec 24 '14 at 16:30
  • 2
    @FPGAwarrior on the contrary, it seems that toStdMap() is linear in the size of the QMap, so it should make a difference. – Patrick Trentin Mar 15 '17 at 9:32
  • Also prefer the now available for(auto e : qAsConst(extensions.keys())), as this will avoid a deep copy of the container. – Adrien Leravat May 25 '18 at 13:29
  • @FPGAwarrior Who says QMap stores the keys in a QList internally? I bet this list is constructed from the map's internal structure when requested. – rubenvb Aug 10 '18 at 9:13
  • 1
    Qt users in a nutshell. – Youda008 Jun 29 '19 at 15:02
47

C++11 range-based-for uses the type of the dereferenced iterator as the automatically deduced "cursor" type. Here, it is the type of the expression *map.begin().
And since QMap::iterator::operator*() returns a reference to the value (of type QString &), the key isn't accessible using that method.

You should use one of the iterator methods described in the documentation but you should avoid using

  • keys() because it involves creating a list of keys and then searching the value for each key, or,
  • toStdMap() because it copies all the map elements to another one,

and that wouldn't be very optimal.


You could also use a wrapper to get QMap::iterator as the auto type:

template<class Map>
struct RangeWrapper {
    typedef typename Map::iterator MapIterator;
    Map &map;

    RangeWrapper(Map & map_) : map(map_) {}

    struct iterator {
        MapIterator mapIterator;
        iterator(const MapIterator &mapIterator_): mapIterator(mapIterator_) {}
        MapIterator operator*() {
            return mapIterator;
        }
        iterator & operator++() {
            ++mapIterator;
            return *this;
        }
        bool operator!=(const iterator & other) {
            return this->mapIterator != other.mapIterator;
        }
    };
    iterator begin() {
        return map.begin();
    }
    iterator end() {
        return map.end();
    }
};

// Function to be able to use automatic template type deduction
template<class Map>
RangeWrapper<Map> toRange(Map & map)
{
    return RangeWrapper<Map>(map);
}

// Usage code
QMap<QString, QString> extensions;
...
for(auto e : toRange(extensions)) {
    fout << e.key() << "," << e.value() << '\n';
}

There is another wrapper here.

24

For people interested in optimizations, I have tried several approaches, did some micro benchmarks, and I can conclude that STL style approach is significantly faster.

I have tried adding integers with these methods :

  • QMap::values()
  • Java style iterator (as advised in the documentation)
  • STL style iterator (as advised in the documentation too)

And I have compared it with summing integers of a QList/QVector

Results :

Reference vector :   244  ms
Reference list :     1239  ms

QMap::values() :     6504  ms
Java style iterator :    6199  ms
STL style iterator :     2343  ms

Code for those interested :

#include <QDateTime>
#include <QMap>
#include <QVector>
#include <QList>
#include <QDebug>

void testQMap(){
    QMap<int, int> map;
    QVector<int> vec;
    QList<int> list;

    int nbIterations = 100;
    int size = 1000000;
    volatile int sum = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i<size; ++i){
        int randomInt = qrand()%128;
        map[i] = randomInt;
        vec.append(randomInt);
        list.append(randomInt);
    }


    // Rererence vector/list
    qint64 start = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        for(int j : vec){
            sum += j;
        }
    }
    qint64 end = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    qDebug() << "Reference vector : \t" << (end-start) << " ms";

    qint64 startList = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        for(int j : list){
            sum += j;
        }
    }
    qint64 endList = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    qDebug() << "Reference list : \t" << (endList-startList) << " ms";

    // QMap::values()
    qint64 start0 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        QList<int> values = map.values();
        for(int k : values){
            sum += k;
        }
    }
    qint64 end0 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    qDebug() << "QMap::values() : \t" << (end0-start0) << " ms";


    // Java style iterator
    qint64 start1 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        QMapIterator<int, int> it(map);
        while (it.hasNext()) {
            it.next();
            sum += it.value();
        }
    }
    qint64 end1 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    qDebug() << "Java style iterator : \t" << (end1-start1) << " ms";


    // STL style iterator
    qint64 start2 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        QMap<int, int>::const_iterator it = map.constBegin();
        auto end = map.constEnd();
        while (it != end) {
            sum += it.value();
            ++it;
        }
    }
    qint64 end2 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    qDebug() << "STL style iterator : \t" << (end2-start2) << " ms";


    qint64 start3 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();
    for(int i = 0; i<nbIterations; ++i){
        sum = 0;
        auto end = map.cend();
        for (auto it = map.cbegin(); it != end; ++it)
        {
            sum += it.value();
        }
    }
    qint64 end3 = QDateTime::currentMSecsSinceEpoch();

    qDebug() << "STL style iterator v2 : \t" << (end3-start3) << " ms";
}

Edit July 2017 : I ran this code again on my new laptop (Qt 5.9, i7-7560U) and got some interesting changes

Reference vector :   155  ms 
Reference list :     157  ms
QMap::values():      1874  ms 
Java style iterator: 1156  ms 
STL style iterator:  1143  ms

STL style and Java style have very similar performances in this benchmark

  • 6
    this is the best answer and deserves to be selected. everybody can test easily on their system that you are telling the truth. I got very similar values to yours, I wonder why stl iterator is almost twice as fast. Qt documentation states misleadingly "[Java style iterators] They are more convenient to use than the STL-style iterators, at the price of being slightly less efficient.". 100% is more than slightly imo – michnovka Oct 20 '16 at 18:06
  • Thanks you for your kind commentary =) – Fezvez Oct 21 '16 at 5:13
  • @Fezvez i have added const iterators to your code, surprisingly the run time of the const iterators increased vs non cost iterators which calls detach for every iterator access gist.github.com/ejahandar/3b5db3a7f3d1e746103671ef003d4fe5 – e.jahandar Mar 14 '18 at 18:04
  • That's indeed very surprising and I have no idea why it would be so – Fezvez Apr 2 '18 at 21:14
  • Best answer, however I prefer the following syntax: for (auto it = map.constBegin(), end = map.constEnd(); it != end; ++it) – Lennart Rolland Apr 8 '19 at 1:59
18

QMap::iterator uses key() and value() - which can be found easily in the documentation for Qt 4.8 or the documentation for Qt-5.

Edit:

A range-based for loop generates codes similar to this (see CPP reference):

{
    for (auto __begin = extensions.begin(), __end = extensions.end();
            __begin != __end; ++__begin) {
        auto e = *__begin; // <--- this is QMap::iterator::operator*()
        fout << e.first << "," << e.second << '\n';
    }
} 

QMap::iterator::iterator*() is equivalent to QMap::iterator::value(), and does not give a pair.

The best way to write this is without range-based for loop:

auto end = extensions.cend();
for (auto it = extensions.cbegin(); it != end; ++it)
{
    std::cout << qPrintable(it.key()) << "," << qPrintable(it.value());
}
13

In "old" C++, using Qt, you would do it like this:

QMap< QString, whatever > extensions;
//...
foreach( QString key, extensions.keys() )
{
    fout << key << "," << extensions.value( key ) << '\n';
}

I don't have a C++11 compiler here but maybe the following will work:

for( auto key: extensions.keys() )
{
    fout << key << "," << extensions.value( key ) << '\n';
}

You can also use iterators instead, check out hmuelners link if you prefer using them

  • 2
    Thank you for the reference to doing this in "old" C++. Some of us are stuck in the kennel with the old dawgs ;-) – Freedom_Ben Apr 9 '13 at 21:18
  • 4
    I doubt this is the most efficient "old" way of doing it. More likely: for(QMap<QString, whatever>::iterator it = map.begin(); it != map.end(); it++) {... } – weberc2 Jun 16 '14 at 20:30
  • 1
    Your way is probably slightly more efficient, though mine is both easier to write and easier to read. Also, in larger programs, optimizing file, UI and database operations is usually a lot more efficient than optimizing for loops.. – Tim Meyer Jun 17 '14 at 6:22
1

I used something like this, to achieve my own result. Just in case someone needed the keys and values separately.

{
   QMap<int,string> map; 

   map.insert(1,"One");
   map.insert(2,"Two");
   map.insert(3,"Three");
   map.insert(4,"Four");   

   fout<<"Values in QMap 'map' are:"<<endl;
   foreach(string str,map)
   {
     cout<<str<<endl;
   };


   fout<<"Keys in QMap 'map' are:"<<endl;
   foreach(int key,map.keys())
   {
     cout<<key<<endl;
   }; 
}  
  • The thing is that you want to retrieve the value of a certain key within the for(each) loop... – DrumM Jan 2 '19 at 9:43
0

Another convenient method, from the QMap Docs. It allows explicit access to key and value (Java-Style iterator):

QMap<QString, QString> extensions;
// ... fill extensions
QMapIterator<QString, QString> i(extensions);
while (i.hasNext()) {
    i.next();
    qDebug() << i.key() << ": " << i.value();
}

In case you want to be able to overwrite, use QMutableMapIterator instead.

There's another convenient Qt method, if you're only interested in reading the values, without the keys (using Qts foreach and c++11):

QMap<QString, QString> extensions;
// ... fill extensions
foreach (const auto& value, extensions)
{
    // to stuff with value
}

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