84

What's the best way to strip the "0."XXX% off a number and make it a percentage? What happens if the number happens to be an int?

var number1 = 4.954848;
var number2 = 5.9797;

$(document).ready(function() {    
    final = number1/number2;
    alert(final.toFixed(2) + "%");
});
171

A percentage is just:

(number_one / number_two) * 100

No need for anything fancy:

var number1 = 4.954848;
var number2 = 5.9797;

alert(Math.floor((number1 / number2) * 100)); //w00t!
  • 44
    to keep the pct decimal: var pct = (num*100).toFixed(1) + "%"; – efwjames Nov 9 '12 at 21:18
  • 5
    alert(~~((number1 / number2) * 100)); as the Math.floor is slower than ~~ :) – nyxz Apr 7 '15 at 13:34
  • 1
    Why Math.floor? And not Math.round? Even in your example 4.954848 / 5.9797 is closer to 83% than to 82% your code outputs. – gaazkam May 16 '17 at 14:46
  • 6
    @nyxz Ugg-- you write code for humans, not machines. Unless you are in some super-tight critical loop, ~~ is much less readable than Math.floor – Jeremy J Starcher May 16 '17 at 15:19
  • 4
    No reason that I know of. 83% of all percentages are made up anyway – Neal May 17 '17 at 1:21
46
((portion/total) * 100).toFixed(2) + '%'
  • best answer, thanks man – Mattia Oct 23 '18 at 9:44
24

The best solution, where en is the English locale:

fraction.toLocaleString("en", {style: "percent"})

  • 1
    Beware for support or not on smartphones.... Currently the support is not that ideal. – jdehaan Jan 31 '18 at 10:10
  • (9.23).toLocaleString("en", {style: "percent"}) returns "923%", is there a way to solve it? – slorenzo Mar 23 '18 at 15:31
  • 1
    @slorenzo 9.23 is in fact 923%. Assuming you want 9.23%, you would need to divide 9.23 by 100 and then try the conversion. – Steve Hawkins Jun 25 '18 at 14:29
  • @slorenzo To get the decimal digits as well you could try something like fraction.toLocaleString("en", { style: "percent", minimumFractionDigits: 2 }) See stackoverflow.com/a/29773435/411428 – Manfred Jan 28 at 0:21
16

Well, if you have a number like 0.123456 that is the result of a division to give a percentage, multiply it by 100 and then either round it or use toFixed like in your example.

Math.round(0.123456 * 100) //12

Here is a jQuery plugin to do that:

jQuery.extend({
    percentage: function(a, b) {
        return Math.round((a / b) * 100);
    }
});

Usage:

alert($.percentage(6, 10));
  • 15
    Where is jQuery.round and jQuery.divide and jQuery.multiply – Raynos Dec 15 '11 at 15:55
  • 2
    @Xeon06 hmmm the OP seems to have switched his mind. weird. my answer did not have enough jQuery in it. – Neal Dec 15 '11 at 16:07
  • 2
    @Raynos I had started on a multiply using a loop and a round using string manipulation but I gave up on the division. – Alex Turpin Dec 15 '11 at 16:14
  • @Xeon06 lol Maximum call stack: jsfiddle.net/maniator/QzXMg/3 – Neal Dec 15 '11 at 16:44
2

Numeral.js is a library I created that can can format numbers, currency, percentages and has support for localization.

numeral(0.7523).format('0%') // returns string "75%"

  • Last commit for numeral.js was 27 Mar 2017. Either the library is perfect (no defects) or it is no longer actively maintained. As of 28 Jan 2019 the project has 135 open issues with the oldest being from Nov 2012. The number of open issues with no commit in almost 2 years suggests that the project is no longer looked after. Happy to be convinced otherwise. – Manfred Jan 28 at 0:11
1

var percent = Math.floor(100 * number1 / number2 - 100) + ' %';

0

@xtrem's answer is good, but I think the toFixed and the makePercentage are common use. Define two functions, and we can use that at everywhere.

const R = require('ramda')
const RA = require('ramda-adjunct')

const fix = R.invoker(1, 'toFixed')(2)

const makePercentage = R.when(
  RA.isNotNil,
  R.compose(R.flip(R.concat)('%'), fix, R.multiply(100)),
)

let a = 0.9988
let b = null

makePercentage(b) // -> null
makePercentage(a) // -> ​​​​​99.88%​​​​​
  • While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – 31piy Aug 22 '18 at 6:08

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