I have 3 tables: dentists, groups, and groupdentlink. Many dentists link to many groups through the groupdentlink table.

So I'm trying to make a query where it will insert rows into groupdentlink (linking all dentists in the state with all the groups in the state) but only if those rows don't already exist. In a nutshell I want to add new rows without overwriting existing ones or duplicating them.

So the intent of the query is something like:

INSERT INTO groupdentlink (f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id)
VALUES ('$_POST[id]', '$groupid', '$scheduleid')
WHERE NOT EXISTS ('$_POST[id]', '$groupid')

And I don't have any primary keys in the groupdentlink table.

Thank you in advance!

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you really want to write your own (working) query..


INSERT INTO groupdentlink (
  f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id
) SELECT 
    '$_POST[id]'  f_dent_id, 
    '$groupid'    f_group_id,
    '$scheduleid' f_schedule_id
FROM DUAL
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT 1
  FROM `groupdentlink`
  WHERE 
    f_dent_id = '$_POST[id]' AND f_group_id = '$groupid'
  LIMIT 1 -- will stop mysql to stop searching after first match
)

... but MySQL can handle all this for you!


You don't need primary keys to make MySQL handle this for you, you should add a UNIQUE key constraint on the combined set of the two columns.

Query to add the unique key dent_group_uniq_key to groupdentlink.

ALTER TABLE groupdentlink ADD UNIQUE KEY `dent_group_uniq_key` (
  f_dent_id, f_group_id
);

Then use INSERT IGNORE on your query:

INSERT IGNORE INTO groupdentlink (
  f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id
) VALUES (
  '$_POST[id]', '$groupid', '$scheduleid'
)

INSERT IGNORE will try to insert a row to your table, if it fails due to a key constraint it will act like nothing happen.

  • OK, but you won't get an error if it fails for different reasons, like a foreign key constraint violation. – greyfairer Dec 16 '11 at 13:26
  • @greyfairer It will only "IGNORE" if the insert fails due to a duplicate key, foreign key constraints still apply. – Filip Roséen - refp Dec 16 '11 at 13:37
  • Thank you very much. I'm using the second method: Unique key from combined columns since it seems simpler to me. – Brian Barrus Dec 16 '11 at 22:50
  • You don't need the LIMIT 1 in the subquery, MySQL automatically stops after a single row is found in a EXISTS clause – Hans Z Aug 31 '16 at 18:30
INSERT INTO groupdentlink (f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id)
SELECT '$_POST[id]', '$groupid', '$scheduleid' FROM dual
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  select * from groupdentlink 
  where f_dent_id='$_POST[id]'
  and f_group_id='$groupid'
)

And I think you can create a composite primary key on the combination (f_dent_id, f_group_id) just to make sure.

  • As a tip, use 1 instead of * on your exists statements so that you're not trying to pull back a large column set in memory. Speeds up the query a bit (can have a big impact the larger the query gets, and depends on the engine). – Eric Dec 15 '11 at 19:20
  • @Eric, that is not the case. See the Docs: Traditionally, an EXISTS subquery starts with SELECT * , but it could begin with SELECT 5 or SELECT column1 or anything at all. MySQL ignores the SELECT list in such a subquery, so it makes no difference. – The Scrum Meister Dec 15 '11 at 19:26
  • Ah, MySQL doesn't do that--older versions of SQL Server used to (don't know if they still do), and that's where all my work is done in. I use it as a best practice. – Eric Dec 15 '11 at 19:30
  • darn, getting syntax error. Triple, checking my code... – Brian Barrus Dec 15 '11 at 19:52
  • Can't find any errant parentheses, commas, quote marks yet. Any ideas? The code you posted looks good? Mysql server version is 5.1.60. – Brian Barrus Dec 15 '11 at 20:00

You've almost got it! You can use a select statement to feed an insert statement. Just do this:

INSERT INTO groupdentlink (f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id)
SELECT '$_POST[id]', '$groupid', '$scheduleid'
WHERE 
    NOT EXISTS (
    select 
        1 
    from 
        groupdentlink 
    where 
        f_dent_id = $_POST[id] 
        and f_group_id = '$groupid'
    )
  • hmm. Here's my query: "INSERT INTO groupdentlink (f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id) SELECT '$_POST[id]', '$rowv[id]', '$row[f_sched_id]' WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM groupdentlink WHERE f_dent_id = '$_POST[id]' AND f_group_id = '$groupid'" ...and I'm getting a syntax error – Brian Barrus Dec 15 '11 at 19:40
  • You need the closing paren on the exists clause. – Eric Dec 15 '11 at 19:48
  • ...fixed that. Still not working. Oy :( – Brian Barrus Dec 15 '11 at 20:06
  • What's the syntax error that you're getting, or is it not specific? – Eric Dec 15 '11 at 20:09
  • Not specific. You have an error in your SQL syntax – Brian Barrus Dec 15 '11 at 20:12
INSERT INTO groupdentlink (f_dent_id, f_group_id, f_schedule_id)
VALUES ('$_POST[id]', '$groupid', '$scheduleid')
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  select * from groupdentlink 
  where f_dent_id='$_POST[id]'
  and f_group_id='$groupid'
)

And I think you can create a composite primary key on the combination (f_dent_id, f_group_id).

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