15

Should this work am I going crazy?

.project.work:first-child:before {
  content: 'Projects';
}
.project.research:first-child:before {
  content: 'Research';
}
<div class="project work">
  <p>abcdef</p>
</div>
<div class="project work">
  <p>abcdef</p>
</div>
<div class="project work">
  <p>abcdef</p>
</div>
<div class="project research">
  <p>abcdef</p>
</div>

projects:first-child works fine, research:first-child doesn't stick. Any ideas?

Demo It doesn't work, but whats the best way to achieve this?

6
  • 2
    :first-child only selects the first child. Nothing else.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:39
  • .project.research:first-child Isn't that the first of its kind though?
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:41
  • It is, but it's not the first child of its parent.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:41
  • So it's looking at the parent not at the child? Should I use Jquery then to select it?
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:42
  • why use first-child? couldn't you just use .project.work p:before and .project.research p:before Dec 16, 2011 at 14:43

3 Answers 3

14

:first-child only selects the first child of its parent. Nothing else.

As mentioned in a few of my other answers on the site (1 2 3 4), there is no :first-of-class pseudo-class. If you are looking to apply styles to the first of each class of your div elements, a solution is to apply the styles to all children of that class, and a general sibling selector to undo the styles from subsequent siblings.

Your CSS would then look like this:

.project.work:before {
    content: 'Work';
}

.project.research:before {
    content: 'Research';
}

.project.work ~ .project.work:before, 
.project.research ~ .project.research:before {
    content: none;
}
12
  • There isn't a way in pure CSS to apply this dynamically (i.e. without having to hardcode the extra classes if you decide to add more later on), though. Once you add more classes, you have to add them to your CSS manually in this pattern.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:49
  • Perfect, apply to all and undo siblings. Thanks @boltclock So if I if have add another class like .project.photography it wont work?
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:51
  • fiddle It repeats the Photo :first-child have I done something wrong?
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:57
  • @uriah: Your last selector should be .project.work ~ .project.work:before, .project.photo ~ .project.photo:before, .project.research ~ .project.research:before, you had an extra .project.work ~ in the Photo part. The ~ selector doesn't limit itself to adjacent siblings, unlike +, so you don't need the extra work selector.
    – BoltClock
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:59
  • Sorry, should this work? Shouldn't Photo only appear once?
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 15:03
1

From the specification:

Same as :nth-child(1). The :first-child pseudo-class represents an element that is the first child of some other element.

.project.research is not the first child of its parent.

0

I believe you want this CSS:

.project.work p:first-child:before {content:'Projects';}
.project.research p:first-child:before {content:'Research';}

or

.project.work > p:first-child:before {content:'Projects';}
.project.research > p:first-child:before {content:'Research';}

Updated fiddle

That matches the first child of an element with the classes "project" and "work" (or "project" and "research"). You don't have to use p:first-child if it may not be a p element, you could use *:first-child instead.

2
  • Thanks! I would only like to select the first of its kind and apply the CSS not every element. This select all of them.
    – uriah
    Dec 16, 2011 at 14:47
  • @uriah: Ah. I don't think you can do that without changing your markup. I don't think even CSS3 selectors have a way of selecting the first element in a container with a given pair of class names. Even :first-of-type would apply to the element type, irrespective of class. Dec 16, 2011 at 14:58

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