15

No, I'm not referring to the unset() language construct, but the (unset) type caster. From the PHP manual:

The casts allowed are:

  • (int), (integer) - cast to integer
  • (bool), (boolean) - cast to boolean
  • (float), (double), (real) - cast to float
  • (string) - cast to string
  • (array) - cast to array
  • (object) - cast to object
  • (unset) - cast to NULL (PHP 5)

URL: http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php

Does anyone have any idea about this (or even used it in an actual project)?

  • Check this guy's comment out, seems like just another way to unset(): php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php#89637 – Wesley Murch Dec 17 '11 at 2:20
  • 1
    @Madmartigan: that guy is wrong. Let's wait for an answer from deceze . He explained it a little here – meze Dec 17 '11 at 2:30
  • agreed with @meze, (unset)$var does not actually unset the variable $var – Lepidosteus Dec 17 '11 at 2:32
  • 1
    @Madmartigan: this is because isset() return true for variable which are equal to null, from the documentation "Determine if a variable is set and is not NULL". His code set the variable to null, but it does still exists in the local scope. This is not the same thing as unset($hello) which would remove the variable from the scope (as if it had never been defined). If you had used unset($hello), you would get NOTICEs from php about $hello not existing when you var_dump() over it. – Lepidosteus Dec 17 '11 at 2:42
  • 1
    @meze I have already written all I have to say about this topic in the linked bug report and here: kunststube.net/isset It simply is a rather nonsensical construct, IMO. – deceze Dec 17 '11 at 3:02
4

I didn't even know this was a thing, but it seems like the purpose is just completeness for available php primitives (NULL being one of them). Note that this casts the data .. it does not do a write.

$x = 'foon';
$y = (unset)$x;
var_dump($x, $y) // 'foon', NULL

Note that x is not null in spite of the cast.

Near as I can tell, there's no reason to ever use (unset)<anything> as opposed to just writing NULL. Perhaps someone else can come up with a better answer, though.

| improve this answer | |
  • It will evaluate <anything>. NULL won't. – rightfold Nov 18 '16 at 15:58
2

I use (unset) casting to avoid creating ugly if else statements in situation if you need to validate and use many variables, but if one variable is considered incorrect and you do not want to check remaining.

For example, you have following code:

$variableone = "ffo";
$variabletwo = "obb";
$variablethree = "aar";

if(checkonefailed($variableone))
{
    outputsomething();
}
else
{
    dosomething($variableone)
    if(checktwofailed($variabletwo))
    {
        outputsomething();
    }
    else
    {
        dosomething($variabletwo)
        if(checkthreefailed($variablethree))
        {
            outputsomething();
        }
        else
        {
            dosomething($variablethree)
            //And so own
        }
    }
}

You can rewrite it like this:

$variableone = "ffo";
$variabletwo = "obb";
$variablethree = "aar";

if(checkonefailed($variableone))
{
    outputsomething();
}
//False or check
elseif((unset)(dosomething($variableone))||(checktwofailed($variabletwo)))
{
    outputsomething();
}
elseif((unset)(dosomething($variabletwo))||(checkthreefailed($variablethree)))
{
    outputsomething();
}
elseif((unset)(dosomething($variablethree))/*or next variable*/)
{
  //And so own
}

Idea taken from Go programming code

if variableone := "ffo"; checkonefailed(variableone) {
    outputsomething()
} else if dosomething(variableone); variabletwo := "obb"; checktwofailed(variabletwo) {
    outputsomething()
} else if dosomething(variabletwo); variablethree := "aar"; checkthreefailed(variablethree) {
    outputsomething()
} else dosomething(variablethree)
| improve this answer | |
1

The only thing I can think of is some future use-case where a class can define how cast operators work, e.g as with per __toString(). A class could potentially be marked non-nullable and hence casting to null would throw an exception. That would be fundamentally different from assigning NULL, although why on earth it's named unset is a mystery.

| improve this answer | |
  • Why unset? I think that they want to have cast for every type, even for null. But there is problem with (null) because this is nothing else than NULL in brackets. So most likely they have to avoid unexpected results. – Krzysiek Jul 13 '15 at 8:44
1

The (unset) cast has now been deprecated in PHP 7.2.x. So, don't use it anymore.

Ref: http://php.net/manual/en/migration72.deprecated.php#migration72.deprecated.unset-cast

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0

The purpose is to cast to NULL, like you already wrote in your question:

(unset) - cast to NULL (PHP 5)

So let's say you have a variable $var of which isset($var) is TRUE. You can then cast that variable to NULL:

/**
 * @param mixed $var anything
 */
function func($var)
{
    if (isset($var))
    {
        $var = (unset) $var;
    }
    # the rest of the code expects $var to be NULL
    ...
}

Sure,$var = NULL would do the same here, but w/o casting.

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  • 1
    We all understand it. But the question is wt.. what is it for? – meze Dec 17 '11 at 2:32
  • For cases someone might need it. – hakre Dec 17 '11 at 2:34
  • 1
    Like? I really can't think up any case – meze Dec 17 '11 at 2:34
  • 1
    But if input is needed to be NULL, then we can just pass NULL as an argument... – meze Dec 17 '11 at 2:40
  • 2
    For one, if (isset($var)) would be better written as if ($var !== null), since the variable will always be set, since it's a function parameter. Secondly, if the variable is always supposed to be null, why make it a function parameter in the first place? Third, even if that somehow made sense, just initialize $var = null at the top of the function, it has exactly the same effect. – deceze Dec 17 '11 at 3:09
0

According to php.net:

Example #2 Using (unset) casting

(unset) casting is often confused with the unset() function. (unset) casting serves only as a NULL-type cast, for completeness. It does not alter the variable it's casting.

So, the way I read it is "All types are castable, null is a type so just for consistency we added a cast to null"

| improve this answer | |

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