279

Is there a container adapter that would reverse the direction of iterators so I can iterate over a container in reverse with range-based for-loop?

With explicit iterators I would convert this:

for (auto i = c.begin(); i != c.end(); ++i) { ...

into this:

for (auto i = c.rbegin(); i != c.rend(); ++i) { ...

I want to convert this:

for (auto& i: c) { ...

to this:

for (auto& i: std::magic_reverse_adapter(c)) { ...

Is there such a thing or do I have to write it myself?

  • 14
    A reverse container adapter, sounds interesting, but I think you'll have to write it yourself. We wouldn't have this problem if the Standard committee would hurry up and adapt range based algorithms instead of explicit iterators. – deft_code Dec 17 '11 at 4:34
  • 4
    @deft_code: "instead of?" Why would you want to get rid of iterator based algorithms? They're much better and less verbose for cases where you don't iterate from begin to end, or for dealing with stream iterators and the like. Range algorithms would be great, but they're really just syntactic sugar (except for the possibility of lazy evaluation) over iterator algorithms. – Nicol Bolas Dec 17 '11 at 4:41
  • 16
    @deft_code template<typename T> class reverse_adapter { public: reverse_adapter(T& c) : c(c) { } typename T::reverse_iterator begin() { return c.rbegin(); } typename T::reverse_iterator end() { return c.rend(); } private: T& c; }; It can be improved (adding const versions, etc) but it works: vector<int> v {1, 2, 3}; reverse_adapter<decltype(v)> ra; for (auto& i : ra) cout << i; prints 321 – Seth Carnegie Dec 17 '11 at 4:56
  • 9
    @SethCarnegie: And to add a nice functional form: template<typename T> reverse_adapter<T> reverse_adapt_container(T &c) {return reverse_adapter<T>(c);} So then you can just use for(auto &i: reverse_adapt_container(v)) cout << i; to iterate. – Nicol Bolas Dec 17 '11 at 5:31
  • 1
    Even though range based for loop is defined as iterating consecutively from begin to end, I think semantically it means that the order of operation is not important. – Siyuan Ren Sep 10 '13 at 3:22
211

Actually Boost does have such adaptor: boost::adaptors::reverse.

#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/range/adaptor/reversed.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::list<int> x { 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 };
    for (auto i : boost::adaptors::reverse(x))
        std::cout << i << '\n';
    for (auto i : x)
        std::cout << i << '\n';
}
71

Actually, in C++14 it can be done with a very few lines of code.

This is a very similar in idea to @Paul's solution. Due to things missing from C++11, that solution is a bit unnecessarily bloated (plus defining in std smells). Thanks to C++14 we can make it a lot more readable.

The key observation is that ranged-based for-loops work by relying on begin() and end() in order to acquire the range's iterators. Thanks to ADL, one doesn't even need to define their custom begin() and end() in the std:: namespace.

Here is a very simple-sample solution:

// -------------------------------------------------------------------
// --- Reversed iterable

template <typename T>
struct reversion_wrapper { T& iterable; };

template <typename T>
auto begin (reversion_wrapper<T> w) { return std::rbegin(w.iterable); }

template <typename T>
auto end (reversion_wrapper<T> w) { return std::rend(w.iterable); }

template <typename T>
reversion_wrapper<T> reverse (T&& iterable) { return { iterable }; }

This works like a charm, for instance:

template <typename T>
void print_iterable (std::ostream& out, const T& iterable)
{
    for (auto&& element: iterable)
        out << element << ',';
    out << '\n';
}

int main (int, char**)
{
    using namespace std;

    // on prvalues
    print_iterable(cout, reverse(initializer_list<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, }));

    // on const lvalue references
    const list<int> ints_list { 1, 2, 3, 4, };
    for (auto&& el: reverse(ints_list))
        cout << el << ',';
    cout << '\n';

    // on mutable lvalue references
    vector<int> ints_vec { 0, 0, 0, 0, };
    size_t i = 0;
    for (int& el: reverse(ints_vec))
        el += i++;
    print_iterable(cout, ints_vec);
    print_iterable(cout, reverse(ints_vec));

    return 0;
}

prints as expected

4,3,2,1,
4,3,2,1,
3,2,1,0,
0,1,2,3,

NOTE std::rbegin(), std::rend(), and std::make_reverse_iterator() are not yet implemented in GCC-4.9. I write these examples according to the standard, but they would not compile in stable g++. Nevertheless, adding temporary stubs for these three functions is very easy. Here is a sample implementation, definitely not complete but works well enough for most cases:

// --------------------------------------------------
template <typename I>
reverse_iterator<I> make_reverse_iterator (I i)
{
    return std::reverse_iterator<I> { i };
}

// --------------------------------------------------
template <typename T>
auto rbegin (T& iterable)
{
    return make_reverse_iterator(iterable.end());
}

template <typename T>
auto rend (T& iterable)
{
    return make_reverse_iterator(iterable.begin());
}

// const container variants

template <typename T>
auto rbegin (const T& iterable)
{
    return make_reverse_iterator(iterable.end());
}

template <typename T>
auto rend (const T& iterable)
{
    return make_reverse_iterator(iterable.begin());
}

UPDATE 22 Oct 2017

Thanks to estan for pointing this out.

The original answer sample implementation uses using namespace std;, which would cause any file including this implementation (that has to be in header file), to also import the whole std namespace.

Revised the sample implementation to propose using std::rbegin, std::rend instead.

  • 27
    Few lines of code? Forgive me but that is over ten :-) – Jonny Apr 27 '16 at 1:54
  • 1
    Actually, it's 5-13, depending on how you count lines : ) The work-arounds should not be there, as they are part of the library. Thanks for reminding me, btw, this answer needs to be updated for recent compiler versions, where all the extra lines are not needed at all. – Prikso NAI Apr 27 '16 at 12:37
  • 2
    I think you forgot forward<T> in your reverse implementation. – SnakE Nov 25 '16 at 12:11
  • 1
    Hm, if you put this in a header, you're using namespace std in a header, which is not a good idea. Or am I missing something? – estan Oct 21 '17 at 9:46
  • 3
    Actually, you shouldn't be writing "using <anything>;" at file scope in a header. You could improve the above by moving the using declarations into the function scope for begin() and end(). – Chris Hartman Apr 22 '18 at 17:56
22

This should work in C++11 without boost:

namespace std {
template<class T>
T begin(std::pair<T, T> p)
{
    return p.first;
}
template<class T>
T end(std::pair<T, T> p)
{
    return p.second;
}
}

template<class Iterator>
std::reverse_iterator<Iterator> make_reverse_iterator(Iterator it)
{
    return std::reverse_iterator<Iterator>(it);
}

template<class Range>
std::pair<std::reverse_iterator<decltype(begin(std::declval<Range>()))>, std::reverse_iterator<decltype(begin(std::declval<Range>()))>> make_reverse_range(Range&& r)
{
    return std::make_pair(make_reverse_iterator(begin(r)), make_reverse_iterator(end(r)));
}

for(auto x: make_reverse_range(r))
{
    ...
}
  • 55
    IIRC adding anything to namespace std is an invitation to epic fail. – BCS Sep 18 '13 at 1:33
  • 30
    I'm not sure about the normative meaning of "epic fail", but overloading a function in the std namespace has undefined behavior per 17.6.4.2.1. – Casey Mar 6 '14 at 15:34
  • 8
    It's in C++14 apparently, under this name. – HostileFork Dec 14 '14 at 23:42
  • 5
    @MuhammadAnnaqeeb The unfortunate bit is that doing so collides exactly. You can't compile with both definitions. Plus the compiler is not required to have the definition not be present under C++11 and only appear under C++14 (the spec doesn't say anything about what's not in the std:: namespace, just what is). So this would be a very likely compilation failure under a standards-compliant C++11 compiler... much more likely than if it were some random name that wasn't in C++14! And as pointed out, it's "undefined behavior"...so failing to compile isn't the worst it might do. – HostileFork Feb 28 '15 at 4:26
  • 2
    @HostileFork There is no name collision, make_reverse_iterator is not in the std namespace, so it won't clash with C++14 version of it. – Paul Fultz II Jul 29 '15 at 21:04
11

Does this work for you:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <boost/range/begin.hpp>
#include <boost/range/end.hpp>
#include <boost/range/iterator_range.hpp>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

  typedef std::list<int> Nums;
  typedef Nums::iterator NumIt;
  typedef boost::range_reverse_iterator<Nums>::type RevNumIt;
  typedef boost::iterator_range<NumIt> irange_1;
  typedef boost::iterator_range<RevNumIt> irange_2;

  Nums n = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
  irange_1 r1 = boost::make_iterator_range( boost::begin(n), boost::end(n) );
  irange_2 r2 = boost::make_iterator_range( boost::end(n), boost::begin(n) );


  // prints: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
  for(auto e : r1)
    std::cout << e << ' ';

  std::cout << std::endl;

  // prints: 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  for(auto e : r2)
    std::cout << e << ' ';

  std::cout << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
6
    template <typename C>
    struct reverse_wrapper {

        C & c_;
        reverse_wrapper(C & c) :  c_(c) {}

        typename C::reverse_iterator begin() {return c_.rbegin();}
        typename C::reverse_iterator end() {return c_.rend(); }
    };

    template <typename C, size_t N>
    struct reverse_wrapper< C[N] >{

        C (&c_)[N];
        reverse_wrapper( C(&c)[N] ) : c_(c) {}

        typename std::reverse_iterator<const C *> begin() { return std::rbegin(c_); }
        typename std::reverse_iterator<const C *> end() { return std::rend(c_); }
    };


    template <typename C>
    reverse_wrapper<C> r_wrap(C & c) {
        return reverse_wrapper<C>(c);
    }

eg:

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
        std::vector<int> arr{1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int arr1[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

        for (auto i : r_wrap(arr)) {
            printf("%d ", i);
        }
        printf("\n");

        for (auto i : r_wrap(arr1)) {
            printf("%d ", i);
        }
        printf("\n");
        return 0;
    }
  • 1
    can you please explain more detail of your answer ? – Mostafiz Apr 29 '16 at 3:27
  • this is a reverse range-base loop C++11 class tamplate – Khan Lau May 13 '16 at 9:01
2

If not using C++14, then I find below the simplest solution.

#define METHOD(NAME, ...) auto NAME __VA_ARGS__ -> decltype(m_T.r##NAME) { return m_T.r##NAME; }
template<typename T>
struct Reverse
{
  T& m_T;

  METHOD(begin());
  METHOD(end());
  METHOD(begin(), const);
  METHOD(end(), const);
};
#undef METHOD

template<typename T>
Reverse<T> MakeReverse (T& t) { return Reverse<T>{t}; }

Demo.
It doesn't work for the containers/data-types (like array), which doesn't have begin/rbegin, end/rend functions.

0

You could simply use BOOST_REVERSE_FOREACH which iterates backwards. For example, the code

#include <iostream>
#include <boost\foreach.hpp>

int main()
{
    int integers[] = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };
    BOOST_REVERSE_FOREACH(auto i, integers)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

generates the following output:

4

3

2

1

0
0

If you can use range v3 , you can use the reverse range adapter ranges::view::reverse which allows you to view the container in reverse.

A minimal working example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <range/v3/view.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> intVec = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};

    for (auto const& e : ranges::view::reverse(intVec)) {
        std::cout << e << " ";   
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    for (auto const& e : intVec) {
        std::cout << e << " ";   
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

See DEMO 1.

Note: As per Eric Niebler, this feature will be available in C++20. This can be used with the <experimental/ranges/range> header. Then the for statement will look like this:

for (auto const& e : view::reverse(intVec)) {
       std::cout << e << " ";   
}

See DEMO 2

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