62

I need to try to lock on an object, and if its already locked just continue (after time out, or without it).

The C# lock statement is blocking.

41

I believe that you can use Monitor.TryEnter().

The lock statement just translates to a Monitor.Enter() call and a try catch block.

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  • 1
    What if I'm dealing with inter-process concurrency? Is there some way of using a Mutex in a similar fashion? – Mihai Todor Mar 26 '14 at 10:02
  • This will not work if you are using a method that is async stackoverflow.com/questions/21404144/… – Noam Aug 16 '19 at 3:55
100

Ed's got the right function for you. Just don't forget to call Monitor.Exit(). You should use a try-finally block to guarantee proper cleanup.

if (Monitor.TryEnter(someObject))
{
    try
    {
        // use object
    }
    finally
    {
        Monitor.Exit(someObject);
    }
}
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  • +1, thanks! Proposed a little change, if you like, just to remind it's (almost) always possible to use advanced constructs/patterns without nesting braces indefinitely. – ceztko Jul 1 '11 at 19:07
  • @ceztko, can you clarify? In general, releasing N resources in, e.g., C# requires N nested try-finally blocks. The using statement helps avoid this only for IDisposables. Skipping the try-finally blocks may result in leaked resources in the event of an exception. For example, the Monitor documentation clarifies that the finally block is necessary. Strangely, Ed's link neglects this. – Derek Park Jul 5 '11 at 21:51
17

I had the same problem, I ended up creating a class TryLock that implements IDisposable and then uses the using statement to control the scope of the lock:

public class TryLock : IDisposable
{
    private object locked;

    public bool HasLock { get; private set; }

    public TryLock(object obj)
    {
        if (Monitor.TryEnter(obj))
        {
            HasLock = true;
            locked = obj;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (HasLock)
        {
            Monitor.Exit(locked);
            locked = null;
            HasLock = false;
        }
    }
}

And then use the following syntax to lock:

var obj = new object();

using (var tryLock = new TryLock(obj))
{
    if (tryLock.HasLock)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Lock acquired..");
    }
}
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3

You'll probably find this out for yourself now that the others have pointed you in the right direction, but TryEnter can also take a timeout parameter.

Jeff Richter's "CLR Via C#" is an excellent book on details of CLR innards if you're getting into more complicated stuff.

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3

Consider using AutoResetEvent and its method WaitOne with a timeout input.

static AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(true);
if(autoEvent.WaitOne(0))
{
    //start critical section
    Console.WriteLine("no other thread here, do your job");
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
    //end critical section
    autoEvent.Set();
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("A thread working already at this time.");
}

See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc189907(v=vs.110).aspx https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.autoresetevent(v=vs.110).aspx and https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc190477(v=vs.110).aspx

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  • If millisecondsTimeout is zero, the method does not block. It tests the state of the wait handle and returns immediately. This one works for me and is probably the best answer. I'm editing to give a ready solution. – vezenkov Jun 11 '18 at 10:10

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