13

Given a variable of float type, how to output it with 3 digits after the decimal point, using iostream in C++?

18

Use setf and precision.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main () {
    double f = 3.14159;
    cout.setf(ios::fixed,ios::floatfield);
    cout.precision(3);
    cout << f << endl;
    return 0;
}

This prints 3.142

  • Thanks. It was helpful for me. – ozeron Dec 18 '11 at 20:19
  • This works for 3.14159 but it does not work for 13.14159. Your solution only works for numbers less than 10. – mantler Dec 18 '11 at 20:20
  • @manler You are right, my original post did not, but the final one (the one I edited 11 minutes ago) works correctly. I verified it with 2 and 3 digits before the decimal point, and it prints 3 digits as expected. – dasblinkenlight Dec 18 '11 at 20:25
  • @dasblinkenlight ok! :) – mantler Dec 18 '11 at 20:30
9

This one does show "13.141"

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    double f = 13.14159;
    cout << fixed;
    cout << setprecision(3) << f << endl;
    return 0;
}
7

You can get fixed number of fractional digits (and many other things) by using the iomanip header. For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main() {
    double pi = 3.141592653589;
    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(2) << pi << '\n';
    return 0;
}

will output:

3.14

Note that both fixed and setprecision change the stream permanently so, if you want to localise the effects, you can save the information beforehand and restore it afterwards:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main() {
    double pi = 3.141592653589;

    std::cout << pi << '\n';

    // Save flags/precision.
    std::ios_base::fmtflags oldflags = std::cout.flags();
    std::streamsize oldprecision = std::cout.precision();

    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(2) << pi << '\n';
    std::cout << pi << '\n';

    // Restore flags/precision.
    std::cout.flags (oldflags);
    std::cout.precision (oldprecision);

    std::cout << pi << '\n';

    return 0;
}

The output of that is:

3.14159
3.14
3.14
3.14159
  • Thanks for showing how to save and restore the stream settings, very helpful. – bhaller Sep 11 '16 at 2:19
  • use this line " using namespace std; "for more clean code – Khaled Saif Mar 29 '17 at 20:19
  • @Khaled, there are arguments for and against that which are complex enough that they won't fit within a comment box :-) I myself prefer explicit namespaces for all but the simplest programs or, at a minimum, using specific items within a namespace rather than importing the whole lot. However, that particular discussion is tangential to the question and my answer. – paxdiablo Mar 30 '17 at 1:36
2

If you want to print numbers with precision of 3 digits after decimal, just add the following thing before printing the number cout << std::setprecision(3) << desired_number. Don't forget to add #include <iomanip> in your code.

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