89

I am having a small problem with my SQL query. I'm using the GETDATE function, however, let's say I execute the script at 5PM, it will pull up records between 12/12/2011 5PM to 12/18/2011 5PM. How can I make it pull up records for the whole entire 12/12/2011 - 12/18/2011 basically ignore time.

My script:

WHERE Orders.OrderStatus = 'Shipped'  
AND Orders.ShipDate > (GETDATE()-6)  

10 Answers 10

118

In SQL Server 2008 and newer you can cast the DateTime to a Date, which removes the time element.

WHERE Orders.OrderStatus = 'Shipped'  
AND Orders.ShipDate >= (cast(GETDATE()-6 as date))  

In SQL Server 2005 and below you can use:

WHERE Orders.OrderStatus = 'Shipped'  
AND Orders.ShipDate >= DateAdd(Day, Datediff(Day,0, GetDate() -6), 0)
8
  • 1
    I got this Type date is not a defined system type.
    – henryaaron
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:31
  • 2
    I guess you're not using SQL 2008 then :)
    – DaveShaw
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:31
  • @user1090389 that's why I put the string conversion option ;D Dec 18 '11 at 22:33
  • @DaveShaw - Missing a DATEADD in there
    – MatBailie
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:38
  • Sorry @Dems Dave's looks less complicated
    – henryaaron
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:44
59

Here is the simplest thing I've found

-- Midnight floor of current date

SELECT Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GETDATE()))

The DATEDIFF returns the integer number of days before or since 1900-1-1, and the Convert Datetime obligingly brings it back to that date at midnight.

Since DateDiff returns an integer you can use add or subtract days to get the right offset.

SELECT Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GETDATE()) + @dayOffset)

This isn't rounding this is truncating...But I think that is what is being asked. (To round add one and truncate...and that's not rounding either, that the ceiling, but again most likely what you want. To really round add .5 (does that work?) and truncate.

It turns out you can add .5 to GetDate() and it works as expected.

-- Round Current time to midnight today or midnight tomorrow

SELECT Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GETDATE() + .5))

I did all my trials on SQL Server 2008, but I think these functions apply to 2005 as well.

1
  • This works in 2k5 just tested it. where [ScanDate] >= convert(datetime, datediff(day, 0, getdate())) and [ScanDate] < convert(datetime, datediff(day, -1, getdate()))
    – nulltron
    Mar 21 '19 at 20:19
12
--
-- SQL DATEDIFF getting midnight time parts 
--
SELECT GETDATE() AS Now, 
   Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GETDATE())) AS MidnightToday,
   Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, -1, GETDATE())) AS MidnightNextDay,
   Convert(DateTime, DATEDIFF(DAY, 1, GETDATE())) AS MidnightYesterDay
go
Now                   MidnightToday          MidnightNextDay        MidnightYesterDay     
 --------------------  ---------------------  ---------------------  --------------------- 
 8/27/2014 4:30:22 PM  8/27/2014 12:00:00 AM  8/28/2014 12:00:00 AM  8/26/2014 12:00:00 AM 
5
SELECT getdate()

Result: 2012-12-14 16:03:33.360

SELECT convert(datetime,convert(bigint, getdate()))

Result 2012-12-15 00:00:00.000

3
  • 1
    Thanks for the feedback. What I was trying to highlight that the convert to bigint and back does the rounding for you. Dec 18 '12 at 21:50
  • 1
    This code rounds it up to the midnight at the end of the day if the time is after midday which causes this to be wrong for half the day.
    – ChrisM
    Jul 30 '19 at 11:10
  • Using this method can cause performance impacts later with larger datasets. Aug 2 '19 at 15:27
5

You can convert the datetime to a date then back to a datetime. This will reset the timestamp.

select getdate() --2020-05-05 13:53:35.863

select cast(cast(GETDATE() as date) as datetime) --2020-05-05 00:00:00.000
3

As @BassamMehanni mentioned, you can cast as DATE in SQL Server 2008 onwards...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  yourTable
WHERE
      dateField >= CAST(GetDate() - 6 AS DATE)
  AND dateField <  CAST(GetDate() + 1 AS DATE)

The second condition can actually be just GetDate(), but I'm showing this format as an example of Less Than DateX to avoid having to cast the dateField to a DATE as well, thus massively improving performance.


If you're on 2005 or under, you can use this...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  yourTable
WHERE
      dateField >= DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GetDate()) - 6, 0)
  AND dateField <  DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, GetDate()) + 1, 0)
0
3

Try using this.

WHERE Orders.OrderStatus = 'Shipped'  
AND Orders.ShipDate >= CONVERT(DATE, GETDATE())
1

This might look cheap but it's working for me

SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME,LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR,@dateFieldOrVariable,101),10)+' 00:00:00.000')

0

I usually do

SELECT *
FROM MyTable
WHERE CONVERT(VARCHAR, MyTable.dateField, 101) = CONVERT(VARCHAR, GETDATE(), 101)

if you are using SQL SERVER 2008, you can do

SELECT *
FROM MyTable
WHERE CAST(MyTable.dateField AS DATE) = CAST(GETDATE() AS DATE)

Hope this helps

3
  • 3
    If you use the first example you destory the optimiser's ability to use indexes, etc. Using String functions to do Date arithmetic and comparisons is a very bad idea. It shouldn't ever (imo) even be mentioned, it's that poor an option.
    – MatBailie
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:30
  • You don't have to if you are using SQL Server 2008, otherwise, I am not sure how else you could do it in SQL Server 2000/2005, an example would be appreciated, thanks. Dec 18 '11 at 22:32
  • To be fair. Both options destroy the optmizer's ability to use indexes. You should perform and functionality on the filter predicate column. This includes casts.
    – pim
    May 31 '17 at 17:12
0

You could round down the time.

Using ROUND below will round it down to midnight.

WHERE Orders.OrderStatus = 'Shipped'  
AND Orders.ShipDate >  CONVERT(datetime, (ROUND(convert(float, getdate()-6.5),0)))

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