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I am new in Maven. I think its a very helpful tool. Local repository is automatically filled with .jars neededs on my project.

But I know that it can also work in both directions: your own project has an IdArtifact (designed in pom.xml file), and can be uploaded to a public server. Some times is usefull when you want to develop a public project, but, how to ensure that your project wont be upload to public repository, in pom.xml? and vice-versa?

Maybe its an unfounded concern, but sometimes IDE (like netbeans, that im using), do things without monitoring it. I am a bit "scared" with that. I wont publish some private libraries.

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  • The truly public repositories are read-only. Trust me, you can't accidentally publish. Dec 18 '11 at 22:31
  • Is it sure? Servers that I am using are: oss.sonatype.org and download.java.net/maven/2 and repo1.maven.org/maven2 Are they secure?
    – Raph
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:40
  • If you won't take my word for it, try it yourself. Make a "play" maven project. Run mvn deploy and see what happens. Dec 18 '11 at 22:45
  • [INFO] Scanning for projects... [ERROR] The build could not read 1 project -> [Help 1] [ERROR] [ERROR] The project tutorial:tutorial:${project.version}
    – Raph
    Dec 18 '11 at 22:52
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I agree with Raghuram: One point at a time ;-) So regarding your question

Some times is usefull when you want to develop a public project, but, how to ensure that your project wont be upload to public repository, in pom.xml?

my answer is: In case you have no DistributionManagement Section configured in your pom.xml including the parent, if you have one (if you don't know about that perhaps start reading here), you are safe. To deploy to a repository (public or not) it would have to be configured in the settings.xml.

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  • Most people uses Maven just to manage their own private projects. So, I think this distribution management configuration is just and only used when you are developing a GPL or open project. For an internal enterprise project, it's not the case. Its wht I asked that :-P Maybe a newbe question.
    – Raph
    Dec 19 '11 at 10:00
  • @Raph: Well, you could (perhaps should) setup a Nexus or other repository manager in your company (or even if you're private but ambitous ;-) and will then also need this.
    – Jan
    Dec 21 '11 at 11:15

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