5

The question is:

Suppose o is a reference of type Object that is pointing to a type A object that contains a f method and a toString method. Both toString and f have no parameters. show the statement that calls the toString method and the statement that calls the f method.

is the answer:

 f();
 toString();
12

No, that's not right. First of all, you're not using the instance o to invoke the methods. Without specifying an instance the compiler would cause those methods to be implicitly called on this.

Second, you can't invoke o.f() since f is not a method of Object. An explicit cast is required to tell the compiler that o is of type A.

Object o = new A();
String s = o.toString();
((A)o).f();

See Also

1

Depends on the scope in which you are invoking the function. If you are calling f and toString in instance methods of the A class, then you are correct.

If you are calling f and toString in static methods of the A class, or any method of other classes, then you will need to instantiate a new A object, then call the functions on it, like so:

A myA = new A();  // Assuming the existence of a no-args constructor
myA.f();
myA.toString();

If your reference is strictly of the type Object, then you cannot invoke f, unless you first cast it to type A.

3
  • As Mark points out, since o is of type Object, even though it is referencing an instance of A, a cast is needed to invoke f.
    – Ted Hopp
    Dec 19 '11 at 4:34
  • 1
    @TedHopp Mark Peters's answer is clearly correct, but for my own edification: isn't that what I've said by "If your reference is strictly of the type Object, then you cannot invoke f, unless you first cast it to type A"? Dec 19 '11 at 4:42
  • Yes. I think I posted my comment before you added that.
    – Ted Hopp
    Dec 19 '11 at 4:44

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