-1

How to construct a test to ensure that the user has provided a decimal point somewhere within the string?

6
  • 2
    Downvoting (or voting to close) the question, without a comment does not help the poster improve the question.
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:32
  • -1 For poor sentence construction and lack of detail. Also, is this a homework problem?
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:33
  • @RyanAmos, The question is simple and straight forward. What detail are you expecting? We have two great answers based on the current wording of the question.
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:42
  • @camickr It would have been nice to see that the OP had shown us an example of their attempts and where they are stuck. That way, the OP can get the most help possible.
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:43
  • 1
    @RyanAmos, again then point that in your original comment. We are not mind readers, we don't know what you are thinking when you downvote. Its the posters first question and they can't improve without detailed comments.
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:48
5

Use indexOf(".") method to check whether the string contains a decimal point. Eg:

String str = "232.3";
if(str.indexOf(".") != -1)
{
   // Contains a decimal point
}
else {
   // Does not
}
12
  • Yeah, or you could write your own search loop with a for each. Best to use your own method unless you know theirs is better.
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:32
  • 1
    @RyanAmos, that is a terrible suggestion to write your own loop. Use methods that exist in the API and DON'T reivent the wheel.
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:37
  • @camickr For something as simple as this, I don't think that it is necessarily bad. You're maximizing efficiency. While in a homework problem like this, it probably doesn't matter, you don't know what methods String.indexOf() uses to get information. It could be using a loop, as we expect, or it could be doing something extra we don't need. Seeing as String.indexOf() replies with an integer, not a boolean, it is checking for more than we need, which is just the verification of the existence of something.
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:41
  • @camickr I also think that beginners really ought to reinvent the wheel a few times for practice. There's a lot to be learned from reinventing the wheel, hence why programming classes go through creating data structures like linked lists, hash tables, etc.
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:42
  • @RyanAmos, then post your own answer suggestion your looping solution. There is no need for a comment in this suggestion since you are changing the concept of the answer completely. The answer given here is "first check out methods in the API". Your suggestion is "write looping code from scratch".
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:46
3

Use the contains functions.

public boolean contains(CharSequence s)
1
  • +1, interesting approach if you don't care where the decimal is found.
    – camickr
    Dec 19 '11 at 5:40
2
String userInput="123.23";

if(userInput!=null && unserInput.indexOf('.')!=-1)
{
   //contains decimal point
}
0

An easy way to do this would be with a for each loop

char desiredCharacter = '.';
String myStr = getString(); //get a string somehow
boolean b = false;
for(char c : myStr.toCharArray())
    if(c == desiredCharacter){
        b = true;
        break;
    }
if(b){
    //Character is in the string
}
else{
    //Character is not in the string
}

This way, you don't have to deal with possible inefficiencies brought up by external methods. Plus, the practice of writing your own methods is good for development--we wouldn't want our brains to turn to mush, would we?

3
  • If you're worried about inefficiency, isn't the way to go. toCharArray() copies the internal char[] (it has to, in order to maintain String's immutability).
    – yshavit
    Dec 19 '11 at 7:07
  • Yes, I suppose you could use Reflection to gain internal access to the String. I don't think that would be much faster, though. I suppose iterating through the individual characters with charAt() might be faster. Also, toCharArray() uses System.arrayCopy(), which is native, greatly improving efficiency.
    – Ryan Amos
    Dec 19 '11 at 15:27
  • Um, copying an array and then iterating over it (your approach) is never going to be faster than simply iterating over the original (what String.charAt does). Adding reflection could take away some of the cost (though it may reduce some optimizations, not sure), but now you're going out of your way to reinvent a wheel that really doesn't need reinventing. It's one thing to say "it's good to write your own as a coding exercise," but let's not pretend there's any other reason to do it.
    – yshavit
    Dec 19 '11 at 18:55

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.