139

Is it possible: to have one field in class, but different names for it during serialization/deserialization in Jackson library?

For example, I have class "Coordiantes".

class Coordinates{
  int red;
}

For deserialization from JSON want to have format like this:

{
  "red":12
}

But when I will serialize object, result should be like this one:

{
  "r":12
}

I tried to implement this by applying @JsonProperty annotation both on getter and setter (with different values):

class Coordiantes{
    int red;

    @JsonProperty("r")
    public byte getRed() {
      return red;
    }

    @JsonProperty("red")
    public void setRed(byte red) {
      this.red = red;
    }
}

but I got an exception:

org.codehaus.jackson.map.exc.UnrecognizedPropertyException: Unrecognized field "red"

190

Just tested and this works:

public class Coordinates {
    byte red;

    @JsonProperty("r")
    public byte getR() {
      return red;
    }

    @JsonProperty("red")
    public void setRed(byte red) {
      this.red = red;
    }
}

The idea is that method names should be different, so jackson parses it as different fields, not as one field.

Here is test code:

Coordinates c = new Coordinates();
c.setRed((byte) 5);

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
System.out.println("Serialization: " + mapper.writeValueAsString(c));

Coordinates r = mapper.readValue("{\"red\":25}",Coordinates.class);
System.out.println("Deserialization: " + r.getR());

Result:

Serialization: {"r":5}
Deserialization: 25
32

You can use @jsonAlias which got introduced in jackson 2.9.0

Example:

public class Info {
  @JsonAlias({ "red" })
  public String r;
}

This uses r during serialization, but allows red as an alias during deserialization. This still allows r to be deserialized as well, though.

  • 7
    The documentation for @JsonAlias explicitly states that it has no effect during serialization where primary name is always used. This is not what the OP wants. – Xaero Degreaz Feb 27 '18 at 17:35
  • 2
    @XaeroDegreaz I guess @Asura means, that you can use r as primary name, but red for the @JsonAlias, which allows to serialize it to r, but adds red to be recognized on deserialization. Annotating it with @JsonProperty("r") and additionally @JsonAlias("red") should work fine for the given problem. – Jerrot Feb 21 '19 at 15:21
15

I would bind two different getters/setters pair to one variable:

class Coordinates{
    int red;

    @JsonProperty("red")
    public byte getRed() {
      return red;
    }

    public void setRed(byte red) {
      this.red = red;
    }

    @JsonProperty("r")
    public byte getR() {
      return red;
    }

    public void setR(byte red) {
      this.red = red;
    }
}
  • 11
    But in this case, during serialization, we will get both properties: "r" and "red", with same values. – kiRach Dec 19 '11 at 11:24
13

You can use a combination of @JsonSetter, and @JsonGetter to control the deserialization, and serialization of your property, respectively. This will also allow you to keep standardized getter and setter method names that correspond to your actual field name.

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonSetter;    
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonGetter;

class Coordinates {
    private int red;

    //# Used during serialization
    @JsonGetter("r")
    public int getRed() {
        return red;
    }

    //# Used during deserialization
    @JsonSetter("red")
    public void setRed(int red) {
        this.red = red;
    }
}
6

It's possible to have normal getter/setter pair. You just need to specify access mode in @JsonProperty

Here is unit test for that:

public class JsonPropertyTest {

  private static class TestJackson {

    private String color;

    @JsonProperty(value = "device_color", access = JsonProperty.Access.READ_ONLY)
    public String getColor() {
      return color;
    };

    @JsonProperty(value = "color", access = JsonProperty.Access.WRITE_ONLY)
    public void setColor(String color) {
      this.color = color;
    }

  }

  @Test
  public void shouldParseWithAccessModeSpecified() throws Exception {
    String colorJson = "{\"color\":\"red\"}";
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    TestJackson colotObject = mapper.readValue(colorJson, TestJackson.class);

    String ser = mapper.writeValueAsString(colotObject);
    System.out.println("Serialized colotObject: " + ser);
  }
}

I got the output as follows:

Serialized colotObject: {"device_color":"red"}
5

This was not what I was expecting as a solution (though it is a legitimate use case). My requirement was to allow an existing buggy client (a mobile app which already released) to use alternate names.

The solution lies in providing a separate setter method like this:

@JsonSetter( "r" )
public void alternateSetRed( byte red ) {
    this.red = red;
}
2

I know its an old question but for me I got it working when I figured out that its conflicting with Gson library so if you are using Gson then use @SerializedName("name") instead of @JsonProperty("name") hope this helps

1

They must have included this as a feature, because now setting a different @JsonProperty for a getter and setter results in exactly what you would expect (different property name during serialization and deserialization for the same field). Jackson version 2.6.7

0

You can write a serialize class to do that:

public class Symbol

{
     private String symbol;

     private String name;

     public String getSymbol() {
        return symbol;
    }
    public void setSymbol(String symbol) {
        this.symbol = symbol;
    }    
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }    
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}
public class SymbolJsonSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Symbol> {

    @Override
    public void serialize(Symbol symbol, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider serializers) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        jgen.writeStartObject();

        jgen.writeStringField("symbol", symbol.getSymbol());
         //Changed name to full_name as the field name of Json string
        jgen.writeStringField("full_name", symbol.getName());
        jgen.writeEndObject(); 
    }
}

            ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

            SimpleModule module = new SimpleModule();
            module.addSerializer(Symbol.class, new SymbolJsonSerializer());
            mapper.registerModule(module); 

            //only convert non-null field, option...
            mapper.setSerializationInclusion(Include.NON_NULL); 

            String jsonString = mapper.writeValueAsString(symbolList);

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