3

I spent a little time hacking an R implementation of the lehmann primality test. The function design I borrowed from http://davidkendal.net/articles/2011/12/lehmann-primality-test

Here is my code:

primeTest <- function(n, iter){
  a <- sample(1:(n-1), 1)
    lehmannTest <- function(y, tries){
    x <- ((y^((n-1)/2)) %% n)
    if (tries == 0) {
      return(TRUE)
            }else{          
      if ((x == 1) | (x == (-1 %% n))){
        lehmannTest(sample(1:(n-1), 1), (tries-1))
      }else{
    return(FALSE)
      }
    }
  }
  lehmannTest(a, iter)
}

primeTest(4, 50) # false
primeTest(3, 50) # true
primeTest(10, 50)# false
primeTest(97, 50) # gives false # SHOULD BE TRUE !!!! WTF

prime_test<-c(2,3,5,7,11,13,17 ,19,23,29,31,37)

for (i in 1:length(prime_test)) {
  print(primeTest(prime_test[i], 50))
}

For small primes it works but as soon as i get around ~30, i get a bad looking message and the function stops working correctly:

2: In lehmannTest(a, iter) : probable complete loss of accuracy in modulus

After some investigating i believe it has to do with floating point conversions. Very large numbers are rounded so that the mod function gives a bad response.

Now the questions.

  1. Is this a floating point problem? or in my implementation?
  2. Is there a purely R solution or is R just bad at this?

Thanks

Solution:

After the great feedback and a hour reading about modular exponentiation algorithms i have a solution. first it is to make my own modular exponentiation function. The basic idea is that modular multiplication allows you calculate intermediate results. you can calculate the mod after each iteration, thus never getting a giant nasty number that swamps the 16-bit R int.

modexp<-function(a, b, n){
    r = 1
    for (i in 1:b){
        r = (r*a) %% n
    }
    return(r)
}


primeTest <- function(n, iter){
   a <- sample(1:(n-1), 1)
    lehmannTest <- function(y, tries){
      x <- modexp(y, (n-1)/2, n)   
    if (tries == 0) {
      return(TRUE)
            }else{          
      if ((x == 1) | (x == (-1 %% n))){
        lehmannTest(sample(1:(n-1), 1), (tries-1))
        }else{
        return(FALSE)
         }
    }
  }
   if( n < 2 ){
     return(FALSE)
     }else if (n ==2) {
       return(TRUE)
       } else{
         lehmannTest(a, iter)
         }
}

primeTest(4, 50) # false
primeTest(3, 50) # true
primeTest(10, 50)# false
primeTest(97, 50) # NOW IS TRUE !!!!


prime_test<-c(5,7,11,13,17 ,19,23,29,31,37,1009)

for (i in 1:length(prime_test)) {
  print(primeTest(prime_test[i], 50))
}
#ALL TRUE
5
0

Of course there is a problem with representing integers. In R integers will be represented correctly up to 2^53 - 1 which is about 9e15. And the term y^((n-1)/2) will exceed that even for small numbers easily. You will have to compute (y^((n-1)/2)) %% n by continually squaring y and taking the modulus. That corresponds to the binary representation of (n-1)/2.

Even the 'real' number theory programs do it like that -- see Wikipedia's entry on "modular exponentiation". That said it should be mentioned that programs like R (or Matlab and other systems for numerical computing) may not be a proper environment for implementing number theory algorithms, probably not even as playing fields with small integers.

Edit: The original package was incorrect You could utilize the function modpower() in package 'pracma' like this:

primeTest <- function(n, iter){
  a <- sample(1:(n-1), 1)
    lehmannTest <- function(y, tries){
    x <- modpower(y, (n-1)/2, n)  # ((y^((n-1)/2)) %% n)
    if (tries == 0) {
      return(TRUE)
            }else{          
      if ((x == 1) | (x == (-1 %% n))){
        lehmannTest(sample(1:(n-1), 1), (tries-1))
      }else{
    return(FALSE)
      }
    }
  }
  lehmannTest(a, iter)
}

The following test is successful as 1009 is the only prime in this set:

prime_test <- seq(1001, 1011, by = 2)
for (i in 1:length(prime_test)) {
    print(primeTest(prime_test[i], 50))
}
# FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE TRUE  FALSE
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the help. I can't say this was vital to work, but an exercise that fully defeated me. But now I know about modular exponentiation, i can die a happy man. After looking into it, i rewrote the function in python using the pow() function. I'm glad there is an implementation in R. – jdennison Dec 21 '11 at 15:12
  • This solution works for some numbers. However when the exponent is not a natural number the modpower function blows up. here is the source from the package. The exponent has to be a natural number: floor(k) == ceiling(k). When n=4, (n-1)/2 = 1.5 and the modpower function fails. – jdennison Dec 21 '11 at 17:25
2
0

If you are just using base R, I would pick #2b... "R is bad at this". In R integers (which you do not appear to be using) are restricted to 16-bit accuracy. Above that limit you will get rounding errors. You should probably be looking at: package:gmp or package:Brobdingnag. Package:gmp has large-integer and large-rational classes.

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