17
class A
{
   static int iterator;
   class iterator
   {
      [...]
   };
   [...]
};

I (think I) understand the reason why typename is needed here:

template <class T>
void foo() {
   typename T::iterator* iter;
   [...]
}

but I don't understand the reason why typename is not needed here:

void foo() {
   A::iterator* iter;
   [...]
}

Can anyone explain?


EDIT:

The reason why the compiler does not have a problem with the latter, I found to be answered well in a comment:

in the case of A::iterator I don't see why the compiler wouldn't confuse it with the static int iterator ? - xcrypt

@xcrypt because it knows what both A::iterators are and can pick which one depending on how it is used – Seth Carnegie


The reason why the compiler needs typename before the qualified dependent names, is in my opinion answered very well in the accepted answer by Kerrek SB. Be sure to also read the comments on that answer, especially this one by iammilind:

"T::A * x;, this expression can be true for both cases where T::A is a type and T::A is a value. If A is a type, then it will result in pointer declaration; if A is a value, then it will result in multiplication. Thus a single template will have different meaning for 2 different types, which is not acceptable."

7
  • @AndrewMarshall Why did you change the tags? Is template-meta-programming not the correct term then? I thought "templates" could mean different things such as some predefined text etc?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:34
  • 4
    No template metaprogramming involves using templates to generate code at compile time, which you're not doing here. You can read more on the insanity of template metaprogramming if you wish. Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:38
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/610245/… - related
    – Flexo
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:41
  • @AndrewMarshall So you're claiming that template<class T> void foo() {[...]} will not generate code at compile time when used somewhere in the code?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:44
  • 3
    @awoodland Also known as "stuff Bjarne never intended to be done" :P Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:53

3 Answers 3

52

A name in C++ can pertain to three different tiers of entities: Types, values, and templates.

struct Foo
{
    typedef int A;                   // type
    static double B;                 // value
    template <typename T> struct C;  // template
};

The three names Foo::A, Foo::B and Foo::C are examples of all three different tiers.

In the above example, Foo is a complete type, and so the compiler knows already what Foo::A etc. refer to. But now imagine this:

template <typename T> struct Bar
{
    T::A x;
};

Now we are in trouble: what is T::A? if T = Foo, then T::A = int, which is a type, and all is well. But when T = struct { static char A; };, then T::A is a value, which doesn't make sense.

Therefore, the compiler demands that you tell it what T::A and T::B and T::C are supposed to be. If you say nothing, it is assumed to be a value. If you say typename, it is a typename, and if you say template, it is a template:

template <typename T> struct Bar
{
    typename T::A x;    // ah, good, decreed typename

    void foo()
    {
        int a = T::B;   // assumed value, OK

        T::template C<int> z;  // decreed template
        z.gobble(a * x);
    }
};

Secondary checks such as whether T::B is convertible to int, whether a and x can be multiplied, and whether C<int> really has a member function gobble are all postponed until you actually instantiate the template. But the specification whether a name denotes a value, a type or a template is fundamental to the syntactic correctness of the code and must be provided right there during the template definition.

8
  • 1
    Pretty good explanation, I just have one question: Would you say that compilers have to demand this, or is it just something that makes it easier for the people who write the compiler? I don't know a whole lot about compilers, but I think it should be possible for the compiler to figure out itself? It could just give an error when the template gets compiled at instantiation (when used at some part in the code)?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 3:11
  • @xcrypt: It's absolutely necessary. How else would you parse X::A < X::B > X::C?
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 3:16
  • @Kerrek: Well, you don't, like MSVC. :P (Disclaimer: I don't actually know if MSVC would or would not parse that.)
    – Xeo
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 3:18
  • @KerrekSB copy paste, and if it's not correct, display an error? However I can see that this way it is not able to check whether the definition of your template before instantiation makes sense, but it should be possible, no?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 3:19
  • 5
    @xcrypt, there are several aspects, a compiler needs to consider. For example, T::A * x;, this expression can be true for both cases where T::A is a type and T::A is a value. If A is a type, then it will result in pointer declaration; if A is a value, then it will result in multiplication. Thus a single template will have different meaning for 2 different types, which is not acceptable. Thus, we need to mention explicitly if it's a type or not.
    – iammilind
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 3:23
2

Because in the nontemplate foo, you are doing a valid multiplication operation (assuming you declared iter before that use). Try to omit the star, and you will get a compiler error. The int hides the class.

The typename keyword does not prevent that hiding. Only gcc implements it incorrectly to do so. So if you try to instantiate your function template with A as the type, then you will get a compile error, because the name specified afteer typenake will refer to a nontype on any standard conformant compiler.

0

Because the compiler doesn't know what T::iterator is until the template is instantiated, it doesn't know whether iterator is a class variable, a type, a function, or what. You need to tell it that it is a type by using typename.

6
  • and in the other case, it does know what we want? And I don't see the harm of the compiler not knowing what it is before it is instantiated, isn't that the whole philosophy behind templates?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:36
  • @xcrypt yes, because it knows what A is and therefore what A::iterator is. As for why it works this way, it's because the designers of the language just chose to make it that way. Rather than wait, they just make the programmer tell them what it's supposed to be. Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:39
  • 1
    @xcrypt It doesn't know what T is, but it does need to know what the role of T::iterator in the statement/expression actually is.
    – Flexo
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:39
  • in the case of A::iterator I don't see why the compiler wouldn't confuse it with the static int iterator ?
    – xcrypt
    Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:42
  • 1
    @xcrypt because it knows what both A::iterators are and can pick which one depending on how it is used Commented Dec 21, 2011 at 2:48

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