7

Hey, I Have a cursor in stored procedure under SQL Server 2000 (not possible to update right now) that updates all of table but it usually takes few minutes to complete. I need to make it faster. Here's example table filtered by an arbitrary product id; Example table http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/9464/75187992.jpg Whereas GDEPO:Entry depot, CDEPO:Exit depot,Adet: quantity,E_CIKAN quantity that's used.

Record explainations:
1: 20 unit enters depot 01, 2: 10 unit leaves 01. 3: 5 Unit leaves 01 (E_CIKAN for 1st record will be 15 now) 4: 10 more unit enters depot 01. 5: 3 unit leaves 01 from 1st record. Notice now 1st record has E_CIKAN set to 18. 6: This is where the problem comes in: 3 unit needs to leave depot 01. It takes 2 unit from 1st record and 1 unit from 5th record. My SP can handle this fine as seen in picture, except it's REALLY slow.

Here's the stored procedure translated into English;

CREATE PROC [dbo].[UpdateProductDetails]
as
UPDATE PRODUCTDETAILS SET E_CIKAN=0;
DECLARE @ID int
DECLARE @SK varchar(50),@DP varchar(50)  --SK = STOKKODU = PRODUCTID, DP = DEPOT
DECLARE @DEMAND float     --Demand=Quantity, We'll decrease it record by record
DECLARE @SUBID int
DECLARE @SUBQTY float,@SUBCK float,@REMAINS float
DECLARE SH CURSOR FAST_FORWARD FOR
SELECT [ID],PRODUCTID,QTY,EXITDEPOT FROM PRODUCTDETAILS  WHERE (EXITDEPOT IS NOT NULL) ORDER BY [DATE] ASC
OPEN SH
FETCH NEXT FROM SH INTO @ID, @SK,@DEMAND,@DP

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
BEGIN
   DECLARE SA CURSOR FAST_FORWARD FOR
   SELECT [ID],QTY,E_CIKAN FROM PRODUCTDETAILS  WHERE (QTY>E_CIKAN) AND (PRODUCTID=@SK) AND (ENTRYDEPOT=@DP) ORDER BY [DATE] ASC
   OPEN SA
   FETCH NEXT FROM SA INTO @SUBID, @SUBQTY,@SUBCK
   WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0) AND (@DEMAND>0)
   BEGIN
      SET @REMAINS=@SUBQTY-@SUBCK
      IF @DEMAND>@REMAINS  --current record isnt sufficient, use it and move on
      BEGIN
         UPDATE PRODUCTDETAILS SET E_CIKAN=QTY WHERE ID=@SUBID;
         SET @DEMAND=@DEMAND-@REMAINS
      END
      ELSE
      BEGIN
         UPDATE PRODUCTDETAILS SET E_CIKAN=E_CIKAN+@DEMAND WHERE ID=@SUBID;
         SET @DEMAND=0
      END
      FETCH NEXT FROM SA INTO @SUBID, @SUBAD,@SUBCK
   END
   CLOSE SA
   DEALLOCATE SA
   FETCH NEXT FROM SH INTO @ID, @SK,@DEMAND,@DP
END
CLOSE SH
DEALLOCATE SH
  • Your queries are using a bunch of columns that are not listed in your screen shot. It would probably be better if you included the DDL for the table along with actual descriptions of the columns. – Tom H May 13 '09 at 18:44
  • Tom, I have translated query into English and said Whereas GDEPO:Entry depot, CDEPO:Exit depot,Adet: quantity,E_CIKAN quantity that's used. after screenshot for it. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 18:48
  • E_CIKAN shows amount that's used (by following records) from quantity. Check first 3 records, 20 entry,10+5 departure. E_CIKAN for 1st record will be 15 then. Stored procedure does this just fine, problem is it's really slow. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 19:48
  • (apologies, I have been deleting my comments as I understand more). OK, I get it now. So E_CIKAN shows how many of the ADET have been used. So it starts at 0 and then your stored procedure adds to it. Hence your screenshot shows the final values after the procedure has run. – codeulike May 13 '09 at 19:51
  • You don't need a nested cursor or even any cursor to do what you are trying to do, you can write a few update statements or if its really complex use a temp table to derive some calculating then do your update. But nothing logic-wise in your cursors require the use of cursors. – CodeCowboyOrg Oct 23 '15 at 16:13
10

Based on our conversation in my other answer to this question, I think I have found a way to speed up your routine.

You have two nested cursors:

  • The first one is selecting each row that has an exitdepot specified. It takes the product, depo and amount, and then:
  • The inner cursor loop runs through the rows for that product/depot that have entrydepot specified. It adds onto the E_CIKAN for each one, until it has allocated all the product.

So the inner cursor loop runs at least once for every exitdepot row you have. However, your system doesn't really care which items went out with which transaction - you are only trying to calculate the final E_CIKAN values.

So ...

Your outer loop only needs to get the total amount of items shipped out for each product/depot combo. Hence you could change the outer cursor definition to:

DECLARE SH CURSOR FAST_FORWARD FOR
    SELECT PRODUCTID,EXITDEPOT, Sum(Qty) as TOTALQTY
    FROM PRODUCTDETAILS  
    WHERE (EXITDEPOT IS NOT NULL) 
    GROUP BY PRODUCTID, EXITDEPOT
OPEN SH
FETCH NEXT FROM SH INTO @SK,@DP,@DEMAND

(and then also change the matching FETCH from SH at the end of the code to match, obviously)

This means your outer cursor will have many fewer rows to loop through, and your inner cursor will have roughtly the same amount of rows to loop through.

So this should be faster.

  • Looks great. Right now it's more than twice as fast. I'll continue to test it tomorrow too -to see if it really suits-, before choosing as correct answer. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 21:30
  • More than twice as fast! cool. – codeulike May 13 '09 at 21:36
  • 4
    For other readers: this is a variant of a 'running total' query problem, and so might actually be one of those rare situations where cursors provide the fastest (reliable) solution. See this other question for general details on SqlServer running totals: stackoverflow.com/questions/860966/… – codeulike Jun 6 '09 at 21:29
2

Cursors have to be the worst performing solution to any problem when using T-SQL.

You have two options depending on the complexity of what you're really trying to accomplish:

  1. Attempt to rewrite the entire set of code to use set operations. This would be the fastest performing method...but sometimes you just can't do it using set operations.

  2. Replace the cursor with a combination of a table variable (with identity column), counter, and while loop. You can then loop through each row of the table variable. Performs better than a cursor...even though it may not seem like it would.

  • I have no idea how to do it by UPDATE (even with update from) due 6th record's clause in screenshot. Seems like I'll have to do it the 2nd way you mentioned. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 19:17
  • Then, How can we proceed through table rows? – odiseh Aug 13 '11 at 9:22
1

Remove the cursor and do batch updates. I have yet to find a update that cant be done in batch.

1

remove the cursor and rewrite that as an UPDATE FROM joining in the the cursor's query, you can make the IFs a case if you need to. I'm too busy today to write the UPDATE for you today...

1

First, if you MUST use a cursor, and you're updating stuff, then declare the cursor with the FOR UPDATE clause. (See example below. Note that the example is NOT based on your code at all.)

Having said that, there are a myriad of ways to use something other than cursors, often leveraging temporary tables. I would investigate that route in lieu of cursors.

DECLARE LoopingCursor CURSOR LOCAL DYNAMIC
FOR
    select sortorder from customfielddefinition
    where context=@targetContext
FOR UPDATE OF sortorder
  • I've been trying this one but somehow it raises following error altho i have identity column in select part.. FOR UPDATE cannot be specified on a READ ONLY cursor. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 19:15
  • I have removed FAST FORWARD too, still no luck. I'm thinking it's because of SQL2000.. But the question is, since I'm using @ID from cursor already, would it really make difference if I use WHERE CURRENT OF SH? – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 19:53
1

I can see that the problem you are trying to solve is quite complicated:

  • When there is a row with GDEPO specified, it represents stock going into the depo, and you want to use the E_CIKAN of that row to track how much of the stock gets used later. E_CIKAN will start at 0 and then get added-to as stock goes out, until it reaches ADET.

  • So when there is a subsequent row with CDEPO specified, it respresents stock going out, and you want to go back to E_CIKAN of the GDEPO-row and adjust the E_CIKAN, by adding the amount of stock-out to it.

  • When there have been two separate rows with stock going in (GDEPO specified), sometimes there is an overflow when the E_CIKAN of one row reaches max (ADET) and then you want to add the remainder to the next one.

This is quite a tricky calculation because you have to compare different rows and go back and change values in perhaps one or perhaps two rows to track each stock transaction.

There may be a way to do that without a cursor, as others are suggesting. But I think if you could re-arrange your tables and store the data in a different way, you might be able to make the problem easier.

For example, instead of keeping track of stock in the same table that records the stock transactions, could you have a separate table with 'Product_id, Depo_id, amount' columns that keeps track of the total amount of each product in each depo at one time?

A database design change such as that could make things easier.

Or ... instead of using E_CIKAN to keep track of what is used, use it to keep track of what remains. And keep an E_CIKAN value in each row. So whenever stock goes in or out of a depo, re-calculate E_CIKAN at that point in time and store it in that transaction row (instead of trying to go back to the original 'stock in' row and update it there). Then to find out the current stock, you just look at the most recent transcation for that product/depo.

In summary, what I am saying is, your calculation is slow and cumbersome because you are storing the data in a strange way. In the long run it might be worth changing your database design to make the programming easier.

  • Exactly, you described the problem better than me ;). Now the point is, this stored procedure is used when an update is done to records at past - otherwise I don't even use it at all as I do re-calculate E_CIKAN at new records. I'd like to thank you for database design recommendations but it's something that I can't afford right now. – Ertugrul Kara May 13 '09 at 20:01
  • OK, so normally you re-calculate E_CIKAN as each transaction happens, but your stored procedure is used occasionally when you have to go back and amend previous stock transactions? Now that I understand the algorithm, I might be able to come up with something ... but first, a large cup of tea is needed .... – codeulike May 13 '09 at 20:04
  • OK, I have had a cup of tea and come up with a suggestion - see my alternative answer below – codeulike May 13 '09 at 20:36

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