22

With git describe you can get the number of commits since the last tag. If you only had the tag and the number of commits what is the best way to show the commit that was described?

I know you could use git log tag.. and pipe it to a a script that does the counting but I was hoping for a more elegant solution similar to git show tag~n.

To add more context, we are planning using git describe to create release numbers, for example with

$ git describe
v1.5-39-g5ede964

we would use foo_1.5.39. What we would like to do is knowing 1.5.39 means the 39th commit after the v1.5 tag, find that commit, i.e. find g5ede964. As pointed out in a comment, the 39th commit after v1.5 may not be unique. So perhaps a better way to ask this is what is the best way to find all commits X such that if HEAD was pointing to X git describe would return v1.5-39-*****.

4
  • 2
    You can do git show tag~n to show the n-th commit before that tag. Maybe I'm misunderstanding something …
    – knittl
    Dec 21 '11 at 19:54
  • 1
    I believe moving forward from tag is not possible. Every commit (except the initial one) in git has at least one parent, so you can go backwards by commits. On the other hand this tagged commit (as any other commit) might be a parent of more than one commit and it doesn't have any reference to its children, so the only way you can move is from children to parent and not vice versa.
    – KL-7
    Dec 21 '11 at 20:06
  • @KL-7 Thanks, that makes sense. I added more context to my question on what we are trying to achieve. Based on your point that parents don't reference children, I'm guessing there is no way to to do this. In which case, if you add this as an answer I'll accept it.
    – Joel
    Dec 22 '11 at 10:40
  • 1
    It's worth pointing out that in v1.5-39-g5ede964 the g means that this is git, and the 5ede964 is the SHA.
    – nickgrim
    Feb 11 '13 at 14:13
34

Try

git rev-list tag..HEAD --count

OR

git rev-list tag.. --count

They mean the same thing.

13

If you are looking for the number of commits since the last tag, the following worked for me

git rev-list  `git rev-list --tags --no-walk --max-count=1`..HEAD --count
1
  • 1
    Beware that git rev-list --tags --no-walk --max-count=1 will find the most recent tag, but that tag is not necessarily an ancestor of HEAD. It could be from a separate branch.
    – adl
    Jul 4 '18 at 7:46
7

What you're asking for is impossible in the general case. The number of commits alone can't tell you anything if there are any merges in your history.

For example, given the following repo structure:

a - b - c - d - h
  \           /
    e - f - g

With a tag put on a, the outputs of git describe d and git describe g are identical save for the SHA1:

> git describe d
tag-3-ge8dca33
> git describe g
tag-3-g4fecc2e

That said, if you don't have a bunch of parallel branches going on at once, then you may be able to resolve a given commit number back to a single commit, but if you have even a single active side branch at the time of your tag then this may not work.

If you need reliable release numbers, you should stick to explicit tags.

1
  • It's even worse than this. After you merge, many commits must get renumbered because the commits will be interleaved in some fashion. I'm going with Linus Torvalds and using the git describe output as-is for my version number. May 15 '18 at 0:28
4

You can:

git log --oneline tag.. | wc -l

this will give you the number of commits

4
  • 1
    But I want the nth commit since a tag, not the number of commits since a tag. Basically the inverse of git describe.
    – Joel
    Dec 21 '11 at 19:52
  • 3
    Don't use git log for scripting, use git rev-list instead
    – knittl
    Dec 21 '11 at 19:54
  • 1
    @knittl, could you add some detail to that thought? Why favor rev-list over log? I'm in a situation where scripting with log appears to be the way to go, and would like to stick to best practices.
    – Urs Reupke
    Aug 25 '12 at 11:31
  • 5
    @UrsReupke: log is a porcelain command its output format might change with future versions of git (e.g. with the new i18n efforts). rev-list is guaranteed to remain output-compatible across different git versions. Of course, it's often easier to script around log: for quick one-time or personal scripts this might be OK.
    – knittl
    Aug 25 '12 at 11:56
1

Try the following, if you want to get the number of commits since last tag.

git rev-list $(git describe --abbrev=0)..HEAD --count
0

As Kevin's answer explained, this is generally not possible. To solve the problem for special cases he mentioned:

That said, if you don't have a bunch of parallel branches going on at once, then you may be able to resolve a given commit number back to a single commit, but if you have even a single active side branch at the time of your tag then this may not work.

you can use the following command (with n being the number of commits since the tag)

git rev-list tag..HEAD --reverse | awk NR==n
0

what is the best way to find all commits X such that if HEAD was pointing to X git describe would return v1.5-39-*****

is still the wrong question. The right question is

how to find all commits X such that if HEAD was pointing to X an ordinary git describe could ever have returned v1.5-39-*****

and it's not all that easy to answer that. Still, absent enemy action this procedure will list the right commit maybe among some other possibilities:

ancestor=v1.5 n=39
git rev-list --all --reverse --topo-order --parents --ancestry-path ^$ancestor \
| awk ' function minmore(       i) {
                for ( i=2; i <= NF; ++i )
                        if ( gen[$i] > gen[$1] ) 
                                gen[$1]=gen[$i]
                return ++gen[$1]
        }
        minmore()<=n {
                print "[[ $(git rev-list --count "ancestor".."$1") == "n" ]] &&"
                print "         git describe --match="ancestor" "$1 }
      ' ancestor=$ancestor n=$n \
# | sh    # lose the first `#` here to actually run the generated checks

The reason for the uncertainty and complexity is that git describe is just trying to get a reasonable base, so (see its docs) it'll pick the most recent of the closest current tags it can see, and count how many additional commits there are in the described history, and generate a moniker that way. For examples, new tags can change its preferred base such that a bare git describe would no longer generate that moniker; and while SHA's are immutable, references can be rewritten.

0

This will give you the number of commits between these two commit.

$ git log --oneline 8a32722def6b80e343...e817c082323e65bb1053

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