6

imagine a wpf-application where I can dynamically change the theme. I do this by swapping out ResourceDictionaries at the Application-resource level. The theme-resourcedictionaries have implicit styles defined for TextBox and the like.

Now I have a part in my application where textboxes should have this specific style "NonDefaultTextBoxStyle" and not the application wide implicit one.

I would love to do this (using DynamicResource because the theme can be changed during runtime):

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="TextBox" BasedOn="{DynamicResource NonDefaultTextBoxStyle}"/>
    </StackPanel.Resources>
    <TextBox .../>
    <TextBox .../>
    <TextBox .../>
</StackPanel>

instead of having to do this:

<StackPanel>
    <TextBox Style="{DynamicResource NonDefaultTextBoxStyle}" .../>
    <TextBox Style="{DynamicResource NonDefaultTextBoxStyle}" .../>
    <TextBox Style="{DynamicResource NonDefaultTextBoxStyle}" .../>
</StackPanel>

Now to simplify this, I had this idea of setting an inheritable attached property on the StackPanel that would set a specified style on every descendent textbox.

Is this a good idea? Are there simpler ways? Am I missing something?

this pretty much boils down to: What is an alternative to BasedOn="{DynamicResource ...} in a style?

4

I had the exact same problem but for ItemsContainerStyle... so I did pretty much what you said and wrote an AttachedProperty that would allow a dynamic resource for the BasedOn.

DynamicResource for Style BasedOn

Here is the solution modified for your situation:

public class DynamicStyle
{
    public static Style GetBaseStyle(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (Style)obj.GetValue(BaseStyleProperty);
    }

    public static void SetBaseStyle(DependencyObject obj, Style value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(BaseStyleProperty, value);
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for BaseStyle.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty BaseStyleProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("BaseStyle", typeof(Style), typeof(DynamicStyle), new UIPropertyMetadata(DynamicStyle.StylesChanged));

    public static Style GetDerivedStyle(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (Style)obj.GetValue(DerivedStyleProperty);
    }

    public static void SetDerivedStyle(DependencyObject obj, Style value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(DerivedStyleProperty, value);
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for DerivedStyle.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DerivedStyleProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("DerivedStyle", typeof(Style), typeof(DynamicStyle), new UIPropertyMetadata(DynamicStyle.StylesChanged));

    private static void StylesChanged(DependencyObject target, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!typeof(FrameworkElement).IsAssignableFrom(target.GetType()))
            throw new InvalidCastException("Target must be FrameworkElement");

        var Element = (FrameworkElement)target;

        var Styles = new List<Style>();

        var BaseStyle = GetBaseStyle(target);

        if (BaseStyle != null)
            Styles.Add(BaseStyle);

        var DerivedStyle = GetDerivedStyle(target);

        if (DerivedStyle != null)
            Styles.Add(DerivedStyle);

        Element.Style = MergeStyles(Styles);
    }

    private static Style MergeStyles(ICollection<Style> Styles)
    {
        var NewStyle = new Style();

        foreach (var Style in Styles)
        {
            foreach (var Setter in Style.Setters)
                NewStyle.Setters.Add(Setter);

            foreach (var Trigger in Style.Triggers)
                NewStyle.Triggers.Add(Trigger);
        }

        return NewStyle;
    }
}

And here is an example of its use:

<!-- xmlns:ap points to the namespace where DynamicStyle class lives -->
<Button ap:DynamicStyle.BaseStyle="{DynamicResource {x:Type Button}}">
    <ap:DynamicStyle.DerivedStyle>
        <Style TargetType="Button">
            <Style.Triggers>
                <MultiDataTrigger>
                    <MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>
                        <Condition Binding="{Binding Path=FirstButtonWarning}" Value="True"/>
                        <Condition Binding="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Path=IsEnabled}" Value="True"/>
                    </MultiDataTrigger.Conditions>
                    <MultiDataTrigger.Setters>
                        <Setter Property="Background" Value="{DynamicResource WarningBackground}"/>
                        <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource WarningForeground}"/>
                    </MultiDataTrigger.Setters>
                </MultiDataTrigger>
            </Style.Triggers>
        </Style>
    </ap:DynamicStyle.DerivedStyle>
    <TextBlock Text="Button that changes background and foreground when warning is active"/>
</Button>
3
  • I can only encourage you to read the question! You aren't solving my problem! – Markus Hütter Feb 26 '13 at 2:11
  • @MarkusHütter Ah I see your question now. Hmm well continuing with my answer you should be able to change the Attached Depenedencies Properties in my solution to FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.Inherits (using this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms557296.aspx instead of UIPropertyMetadata) and then check the element type StylesChanged function. The attached property will then only need to be written once on the StackPanel element. – NtscCobalt Feb 26 '13 at 5:26
  • @MarkusHütter haha yes pretty much, I think when I first read this over a year ago I only read the bolded part and tried to answer that. My apologies. – NtscCobalt Feb 27 '13 at 5:40
3

does it really need to be an DynamicResource?
so maybe this will help you

if not here is an simple example for StaticResource

App.xaml

<Application.Resources>
        <Style x:Key="myResource" TargetType="Button">
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="Black"/>
            <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="White"/>
        </Style>         
    </Application.Resources>

MainWindow.xaml

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="Button" BasedOn="{StaticResource myResource}"/>
    </StackPanel.Resources>
    <Button Content="blubb" Height="23" Width="75" />
</StackPanel>

if both doesn't help's you maybe you could provide how you add your Resource

Edit

ok that should now answer your question

App.xaml

<Application.Resources>

    <SolidColorBrush  x:Key="background"  Color="Red" />
    <SolidColorBrush  x:Key="foreground"  Color="Blue" />

    <Style x:Key="NonDefaultTextBoxStyle" >
        <Setter Property="TextBox.Background" Value="{DynamicResource background}"/>
        <Setter Property="TextBox.Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource foreground}"/>
    </Style>

</Application.Resources>

MainWindow.xaml

<StackPanel>
    <Button Content="Button" Height="23" Width="75" Click="Button_Click" />

    <StackPanel>
        <StackPanel.Resources>
            <Style   TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}" BasedOn="{StaticResource NonDefaultTextBoxStyle}">
            </Style>
        </StackPanel.Resources>
        <TextBox Text="bliii" Height="23" Width="75" />
        <TextBox Text="blaaa" Height="23" Width="75" />
        <TextBox Text="blubb" Height="23" Width="75" />
    </StackPanel>

</StackPanel>

MainWindow.cs

private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            this.Resources["background"] = Brushes.Black;
            this.Resources["foreground"] = Brushes.Yellow;
        }
4
  • I wonder why this is the only question I posted, where people don't read the question! Is the topic and the problem too hard to understand? to answer you: yes, it needs to be a DynamicResource due to my requirement to "dynamically change the theme" (1st sentence). If you'd read your linked question you would have noticed, that the answer just as your answer doesn't use a dynamic resource. So sorry, this doesn't help! – Markus Hütter Apr 25 '13 at 15:26
  • @MarkusHütter sorry for doesn't read thoroughly enough. Maybe you should bold it as eye catcher – WiiMaxx Apr 25 '13 at 22:44
  • @MarkusHütter i think my Edit will now answer your question – WiiMaxx Apr 26 '13 at 7:02
  • Thanks, this might indeed work. It would mean a change of thought from changing the styles to changing the resources. I appreciate your effort to edit your answer. +1 – Markus Hütter Apr 26 '13 at 8:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.