16

I'm wondering the best way to start a pthread that is a member of a C++ class? My own approach follows as an answer...

23

This can be simply done by using the boost library, like this:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

// define class to model or control a particular kind of widget
class cWidget
{
public:
void Run();
}

// construct an instance of the widget modeller or controller
cWidget theWidget;

// start new thread by invoking method run on theWidget instance

boost::thread* pThread = new boost::thread(
    &cWidget::Run,      // pointer to member function to execute in thread
    &theWidget);        // pointer to instance of class

Notes:

  • This uses an ordinary class member function. There is no need to add extra, static members which confuse your class interface
  • Just include boost/thread.hpp in the source file where you start the thread. If you are just starting with boost, all the rest of that large and intimidating package can be ignored.

In C++11 you can do the same but without boost

// define class to model or control a particular kind of widget
class cWidget
{
public:
void Run();
}

// construct an instance of the widget modeller or controller
cWidget theWidget;

// start new thread by invoking method run on theWidget instance

std::thread * pThread = new std::thread(
    &cWidget::Run,      // pointer to member function to execute in thread
    &theWidget);        // pointer to instance of class
3
  • So, I'm not opposed to this... but noone in the shop I work at uses boost... it would be a big paradigm shift. Its a rather huge library as well... what's the best way to start to introduce using it??
    – jdt141
    Sep 17 '08 at 19:38
  • Well, it isn't actually a library at all, just a bunch of includes. So you can pick out some small part of it that catches your fancy and start by including those headers where you need them. Just a couple of neat new language features that you can user here and there as seems appropriate. Sep 19 '08 at 2:02
  • 2
    +1 for boost! Not to nitpick, but shouldn't your variable cMyClass theClass actually be called cMyClass theObject since it's not a class but just an instance? I think this would be clearer. Apr 14 '12 at 17:10
15

I usually use a static member function of the class, and use a pointer to the class as the void * parameter. That function can then either perform thread processing, or call another non-static member function with the class reference. That function can then reference all class members without awkward syntax.

1
  • The wrapper function should have C linkage. Function pointers of free functions might be incompatible due to language linkage
    – sellibitze
    Jun 22 '10 at 6:52
11

You have to bootstrap it using the void* parameter:

class A
{
  static void* StaticThreadProc(void *arg)
  {
    return reinterpret_cast<A*>(arg)->ThreadProc();
  }

  void* ThreadProc(void)
  {
    // do stuff
  }
};

...

pthread_t theThread;
pthread_create(&theThread, NULL, &A::StaticThreadProc, this);
1
  • Thanks for this as I research my current pthread in C++ issue. However, doesn't this effectively conflict with the answer located here: stackoverflow.com/questions/592160/static-vs-extern-c. Don't you need to add extern "C" somehow? Also, are there any issue with doing the actual work in the StaticThreadProc?
    – It'sPete
    Jun 18 '13 at 19:17
3

I have used three of the methods outlined above. When I first used threading in c++ I used static member functions, then friend functions and finally the BOOST libraries. Currently I prefer BOOST. Over the past several years I've become quite the BOOST bigot.

BOOST is to C++ as CPAN is to Perl. :)

0

The boost library provides a copy mechanism, which helps to transfer object information to the new thread. In the other boost example boost::bind will be copied with a pointer, which is also just copied. So you'll have to take care for the validity of your object to prevent a dangling pointer. If you implement the operator() and provide a copy constructor instead and pass the object directly, you don't have to care about it.

A much nicer solution, which prevents a lot of trouble:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

class MyClass {
public:
        MyClass(int i);
        MyClass(const MyClass& myClass);  // Copy-Constructor
        void operator()() const;          // entry point for the new thread

        virtual void doSomething();       // Now you can use virtual functions

private:
        int i;                            // and also fields very easily
};

MyClass clazz(1);
// Passing the object directly will create a copy internally
// Now you don't have to worry about the validity of the clazz object above
// after starting the other thread
// The operator() will be executed for the new thread.
boost::thread thread(clazz);             // create the object on the stack

The other boost example creates the thread object on the heap, although there is no sense to do it.

11
  • What happens if there are two or more different methods in the class that you need to run? Using the () operator is clever ( nice? ) but is it the best way, given that you can only have one per class? May 11 '10 at 17:45
  • 1
    Another thought: insisting on copying the class every time the method is started may not be the best way if the class copy is expensive ( e.g. requires lots of memory ) or may even break the design if the class is a singleton. In any case, what is happening will have to be documented carefully since a lot more is going on than simply running a method. May 11 '10 at 17:57
  • It's a nice idea to wrap a mechanism, which allows you to call several functions on a class, but you'll rarely need it. First I thought it's a nice way, but then I noticed the side effects. If you'd implement something with a copy mechanism, I'd like it. Passing the object instead of the pointer to the boost::bind will copy the object several times. But otherwise you will get trouble in most cases, except Singletons and some 'crazy' object management
    – Spille
    May 12 '10 at 8:12
  • If you're talking about designing a program, you should consider, that a singleton shouldn't have a copy constructor, so you'll notice it at compile time. Of course you have to take 'care' of the complexity of a copy. If necessary, you might use smart pointers inside this your object referencing complex structures. The other posted example is completely restricted on the execution of a singleton function (or crazy object management). In this case boost::bind is nice, but hides trouble else. You can't (easily) create a dynamic number of threads with different objects using the other example.
    – Spille
    May 12 '10 at 8:55
  • @CSpille Are you aware of the dangers of using pointers to reference class data? It does decrease the time and space needs of the default copy constructor, but leaves the copy and the original sharing the same data. If the data is modified by one, it also modifies the other. Not only is this probably not the design intent, but it leads to horrible race conditions between the threads!!! May 12 '10 at 14:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.