38

Hi I am a newbie to C++ I am trying to return a 2d array from a function. It is something like this

int **MakeGridOfCounts(int Grid[][6])
{
  int cGrid[6][6] = {{0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }};

  return cGrid;
}
  • And your question is? Is this C or C++? – Mat Dec 23 '11 at 15:25
  • 3
    If you're a newbie and are trying to return a 2D array, you may need better learning material. Arrays are not beginner-friendly, and even less when they are multidimensional. – R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 23 '11 at 15:29
  • Here is the C version of the same question. – Michael Kristofik Dec 23 '11 at 16:00
  • @MichaelKristofik Is it wise to mix the techniques of these two languages though? It may lead to huge compiling problems. C and C++ are not the same language. – john gonidelis Mar 26 at 22:10
36

This code returns a 2d array.

 #include <cstdio>

    // Returns a pointer to a newly created 2d array the array2D has size [height x width]

    int** create2DArray(unsigned height, unsigned width)
    {
      int** array2D = 0;
      array2D = new int*[height];

      for (int h = 0; h < height; h++)
      {
            array2D[h] = new int[width];

            for (int w = 0; w < width; w++)
            {
                  // fill in some initial values
                  // (filling in zeros would be more logic, but this is just for the example)
                  array2D[h][w] = w + width * h;
            }
      }

      return array2D;
    }

    int main()
    {
      printf("Creating a 2D array2D\n");
      printf("\n");

      int height = 15;
      int width = 10;
      int** my2DArray = create2DArray(height, width);
      printf("Array sized [%i,%i] created.\n\n", height, width);

      // print contents of the array2D
      printf("Array contents: \n");

      for (int h = 0; h < height; h++)
      {
            for (int w = 0; w < width; w++)
            {
                  printf("%i,", my2DArray[h][w]);
            }
            printf("\n");
      }

          // important: clean up memory
          printf("\n");
          printf("Cleaning up memory...\n");
          for (  h = 0; h < height; h++)
          {
            delete [] my2DArray[h];
          }
          delete [] my2DArray;
          my2DArray = 0;
          printf("Ready.\n");

      return 0;
    }
4

What you are (trying to do)/doing in your snippet is to return a local variable from the function, which is not at all recommended - nor is it allowed according to the standard.

If you'd like to create a int[6][6] from your function you'll either have to allocate memory for it on the free-store (ie. using new T/malloc or similar function), or pass in an already allocated piece of memory to MakeGridOfCounts.

  • ok so you mean in C allocate memory and return it? – user1047092 Dec 23 '11 at 15:47
  • @user1047092 Yes, don't forget to free the allocated memory when you are done with it, or delete (if you are writing C++ as the title of this question says). – Filip Roséen - refp Dec 23 '11 at 16:02
  • 1
    No, if you're using C++ don't delete anything. Ever. Always use a resource-managing class. – Puppy Dec 23 '11 at 16:08
  • 1
    @DeadMG ... if he allocates memory, he should delete it. I don't care if you are all over heels in love with resource-managing classes, an allocation should follow by a deallocation. – Filip Roséen - refp Dec 23 '11 at 16:12
  • After I return it, how should I delete it ? it is already out of scope. – user1047092 Dec 23 '11 at 16:15
4

That code isn't going to work, and it's not going to help you learn proper C++ if we fix it. It's better if you do something different. Raw arrays (especially multi-dimensional arrays) are difficult to pass correctly to and from functions. I think you'll be much better off starting with an object that represents an array but can be safely copied. Look up the documentation for std::vector.

In your code, you could use vector<vector<int> > or you could simulate a 2-D array with a 36-element vector<int>.

4

A better alternative to using pointers to pointers is to use std::vector. That takes care of the details of memory allocation and deallocation.

std::vector<std::vector<int>> create2DArray(unsigned height, unsigned width)
{
   return std::vector<std::vector<int>>(height, std:vector<int>(width, 0));
}
1
#include <iostream>
using namespace std ;

typedef int (*Type)[3][3] ;

Type Demo_function( Type ); //prototype

int main (){
    cout << "\t\t!!!!!Passing and returning 2D array from function!!!!!\n"

    int array[3][3] ;
    Type recieve , ptr = &array;
    recieve = Demo_function( ptr ) ;

    for ( int i = 0 ;  i < 3 ; i ++ ){
        for ( int j = 0 ; j < 3 ; j ++ ){
            cout <<  (*recieve)[i][j] << " " ;
        }
    cout << endl ; 
    }

return 0 ;
}


Type Demo_function( Type array ){/*function definition */

    cout << "Enter values : \n" ;
    for (int i =0 ;  i < 3 ; i ++)
        for ( int j = 0 ; j < 3 ; j ++ )
            cin >> (*array)[i][j] ;

    return array ; 
}
0

Whatever changes you would make in function will persist.So there is no need to return anything.You can pass 2d array and change it whenever you will like.

  void MakeGridOfCounts(int Grid[][6])
    {
      cGrid[6][6] = {{0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }, {0, }};

    }

or

void MakeGridOfCounts(int Grid[][6],int answerArray[][6])
    {
     ....//do the changes in the array as you like they will reflect in main... 
    }
0
int** create2DArray(unsigned height, unsigned width)
{
     int** array2D = 0;
     array2D = new int*[height];

     for (int h = 0; h < height; h++)
     {
          array2D[h] = new int[width];

          for (int w = 0; w < width; w++)
          {
               // fill in some initial values
               // (filling in zeros would be more logic, but this is just for the example)
               array2D[h][w] = w + width * h;
          }
     }

     return array2D;
}

int main ()
{

    printf("Creating a 2D array2D\n");
    printf("\n");

    int height = 15;
    int width = 10;
    int** my2DArray = create2DArray(height, width);
    printf("Array sized [%i,%i] created.\n\n", height, width);

    // print contents of the array2D
    printf("Array contents: \n");

    for (int h = 0; h < height; h++)
    {
         for (int w = 0; w < width; w++)
         {
              printf("%i,", my2DArray[h][w]);
         }
         printf("\n");
    }

    return 0;
}
  • This works fine to me !!! – user3785412 Dec 4 '14 at 4:23
  • 2
    You answer had two big drawbacks: 1. You only give code without explanation, and 2. your code formatting was wrong so that the markdown didn't recognize it as a code block. For proper formatting, you need four spaces indentation for each line of code. Note that you can add these four spaces by selecting your code and then clicking on the codeblock button in the editior (the one with the braces {}). I fixed that for you. The missing explanation is yours to give. Ps: I did not downvote. – cmaster Mar 30 '15 at 17:52
  • How is this answer not a copy/paste of the one by Software_Designer below? – Matt Oct 11 '17 at 19:39
  • This is a copy of the code snippet by Software_Designer. – Daniel Mar 22 '18 at 16:10
0

returning an array of pointers pointing to starting elements of all rows is the only decent way of returning 2d array.

  • 3
    add more description to it, why its the only decent way, why not others – piyushj Jun 17 '16 at 3:36
0

I would suggest you Matrix library as an open source tool for c++, its usage is like arrays in c++. Here you can see documention.

Matrix funcionName(){

    Matrix<int> arr(2, 2);

    arr[0][0] = 5;
    arr[0][1] = 10;
    arr[1][0] = 0;
    arr[1][1] = 44;

    return arr;
}

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