7

I am trying to set up my first transaction in MySQL using PHP/PDO...

I just have a quick question, what is the best way to determine if the previous query was successful or not? Here is what I have right now, but I would rather find a way to test the query with an if statement.

This is pretty much mock up code to try to get a working model.. I know $results isn't effectively testing if anything was good or bad.. i have it there more as a place holder for the real deal when the time comes..

if ($_POST['groupID'] && is_numeric($_POST['groupID'])) {
    $sql = "SET AUTOCOMMIT=0";
    $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
    $dbs->execute();

    $sql = "START TRANSACTION";
    $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
    $dbs->execute();

    $sql = "DELETE FROM users_priveleges WHERE GroupID=:groupID";
    $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
    $dbs->bindParam(":groupID", $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
    $dbs->execute();

    try {
        $sql = "DELETE FROM groups WHERE GroupID=:groupID LIMIT 1";
        $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
        $dbs->bindParam(":groupID", $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $dbs->execute();

        $results["error"] = null;
        $results["success"] = true;

        try {
            $sql = "DELETE FROM users WHERE Group=:groupID";
            $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
            $dbs->bindParam(":groupID", $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
            $dbs->execute();

            $results["error"] = null;
            $results["success"] = true;

            $sql = "COMMIT";
            $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
            $dbs->execute();
        }
        catch (PDOException $e) {
            $sql = "ROLLBACK";
            $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
            $dbs->execute();

            $results["error"] = "Could not delete associated users! $e";
            $results["success"] = false;
        }   
    }
    catch (PDOException $e)
    {
        $sql = "ROLLBACK";
        $dbs = $dbo->prepare($sql);
        $dbs->execute();

        $results["error"] = "COULD NOT REMOVE GROUP! $e";
        $results["success"] = false;
    }
}
  • 2
    Why not use PDO's beginTransaction(), commit() and rollback() methods? – GordonM Dec 23 '11 at 16:59
  • LOL I just learned of the beginTransaction method this morning... I figured the other two were there, but hadn't looked them up yet. That is on the TODO list tho thanks! – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 17:00
  • Also, you don't have to prepare() every statement, in fact it's rather wasteful for ones into which you're not going to insert any variables. Just run those with query() instead. Saves on both lines of code and unnecessary prepares. – GordonM Dec 23 '11 at 18:16
24

Some general notes: Don't use bindParam() unless you use a procedure that modifies the parameter's value Therefore, use bindValue(). bindParam() accepts argument value as a referenced variable. That means you can't do $stmt->bindParam(':num', 1, PDO::PARAM_INT); - it raises an error. Also, PDO has its own functions for controlling transactions, you don't need to execute queries manually.

I rewrote your code slightly to shed some light on how PDO can be used:

if($_POST['groupID'] && is_numeric($_POST['groupID']))
{
    // List the SQL strings that you want to use
    $sql['privileges']  = "DELETE FROM users_priveleges WHERE GroupID=:groupID";
    $sql['groups']      = "DELETE FROM groups WHERE GroupID=:groupID"; // You don't need LIMIT 1, GroupID should be unique (primary) so it's controlled by the DB
    $sql['users']       = "DELETE FROM users WHERE Group=:groupID";

    // Start the transaction. PDO turns autocommit mode off depending on the driver, you don't need to implicitly say you want it off
    $pdo->beginTransaction();

    try
    {
        // Prepare the statements
        foreach($sql as $stmt_name => &$sql_command)
        {
            $stmt[$stmt_name] = $pdo->prepare($sql_command);
        }

        // Delete the privileges
        $stmt['privileges']->bindValue(':groupID', $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $stmt['privileges']->execute();

        // Delete the group
        $stmt['groups']->bindValue(":groupID", $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $stmt['groups']->execute();

        // Delete the user 
        $stmt['users']->bindParam(":groupID", $_POST['groupID'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $stmt['users']->execute();

        $pdo->commit();     
    }
    catch(PDOException $e)
    {
        $pdo->rollBack();

        // Report errors
    }    
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Wow thanks for the bindParam/Value info...all the PDO tutorials I've read have used bindParam.. That code looks great, I will tinker with your ideas, makes alot of sense. – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 17:24
  • I'm getting an error when it tries to delete the users in that group. The error says near Group=38... The other two queries still delete the other rows in the other tables, seems the transaction is not working properly... – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 18:30
  • GROUP is an SQL reserved word, so you may need to put it in back-quotes. But it would be better to rename it, so it's not a reserved word, and also so all your tables name it GroupID consistently. – Bill Karwin Dec 23 '11 at 20:39
6

I wouldn't prepare & execute the transaction statements. I'd use PDO::beginTransaction() , PDO::commit(), and PDO::rollback().

PDO::prepare() and PDO::execute() return FALSE if there's an error, or else they throw PDOException if you setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION).

In your exception handler, you should check PDO::errorInfo() and report the nature of the error. Best practice is to log the raw error info, but give the user a more friendly message.

Don't echo the literal error message in the UI -- this can give the user inappropriate knowledge about your SQL query and schema.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Yea I just learned of the transaction methods earlier. The whole reason I wanted to control it with if statements is its easier, for me and my limited experience, to catch the specific error. I also read that try's aren't ideal for what I'm doing for various reasons. Thanks for the info. alot to look into! – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 17:22
  • I just double checked, the setAttribute option is set to be passed when I instantiate the $dbo object, so we are good there..thanks for the feed back – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 17:44
4

PDO Statement's execute() returns TRUE on success and FALSE on failure, so you can test the return value of the previous execute() in your if statement.

$pdo_result = $dbs->execute();
if ($pdo_result) {
    // handle success
} else {
    // handle failure
    // you can get error info with $dbs->errorInfo();
}

That said, as @Bill Kerwin correctly points out (in his answer that I'm totally upvoting because it's exactly correct), it would be preferable to use PDO::beginTransaction(), PDO::commit(), and PDO::rollback().

|improve this answer|||||
  • How do I know what caused the error? I would like to make it responsive to the problem. Sorry first transaction still kinda new to PDO... Thanks for the response – guyfromfl Dec 23 '11 at 16:59
  • 1
    $dbs->errorInfo() See documentation at php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.errorinfo.php for an explanation of its return value. – Trott Dec 23 '11 at 17:01

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