49

Given a file with data like this (ie stores.dat file)

sid|storeNo|latitude|longitude
2tt|1|-28.0372000t0|153.42921670
9|2t|-33tt.85t09t0000|15t1.03274200

What is the command that would return the number of occurrences of the 't' character per line?

eg. would return:

count   lineNum
   4       1
   3       2
   6       3

Also, to do it by count of occurrences by field what is the command to return the following results?

eg. input of column 2 and character 't'

count   lineNum
   1       1
   0       2
   1       3

eg. input of column 3 and character 't'

count   lineNum
   2       1
   1       2
   4       3
2

10 Answers 10

52

To count occurrence of a character per line you can do:

awk -F'|' 'BEGIN{print "count", "lineNum"}{print gsub(/t/,"") "\t" NR}' file
count lineNum
4       1
3       2
6       3

To count occurrence of a character per field/column you can do:

column 2:

awk -F'|' -v fld=2 'BEGIN{print "count", "lineNum"}{print gsub(/t/,"",$fld) "\t" NR}' file
count lineNum
1       1
0       2
1       3

column 3:

awk -F'|' -v fld=3 'BEGIN{print "count", "lineNum"}{print gsub(/t/,"",$fld) "\t" NR}' file
count lineNum
2       1
1       2
4       3
  • gsub() function's return value is number of substitution made. So we use that to print the number.
  • NR holds the line number so we use it to print the line number.
  • For printing occurrences of particular field, we create a variable fld and put the field number we wish to extract counts from.
3
  • 1
    It prints "0"(occurences) as well which might not be desired in the output Sep 15 '15 at 15:05
  • 1
    @TarunSapra It's actually shown as expected result in the question. Sep 15 '15 at 21:50
  • 1
    Note that gsub() will change the record's content. If you need the original value you should call gsub() after other action blocks (or save the original content in a variable). Jul 10 '18 at 17:25
46
grep -n -o "t" stores.dat | sort -n | uniq -c | cut -d : -f 1

gives almost exactly the output you want:

  4 1
  3 2
  6 3

Thanks to @raghav-bhushan for the grep -o hint, what a useful flag. The -n flag includes the line number as well.

6
  • 2
    This is a much more elegant and general solution.
    – Capstone
    Sep 12 '13 at 1:34
  • 3
    I think the sort -n could be dispensed with -- isn't the output in line number order anyway?
    – Tom Zych
    Jun 16 '14 at 11:02
  • 3
    That's weird, that exact command returns "10 t", "1 1", "1 2", "1 3" on my Mac.
    – Michael
    Mar 24 '15 at 23:08
  • 1
    @Gabrial Burt, Can you explain each step of this in your answer .. what are the commands you're piping to and how do their modifiers affect what's happening? Dec 8 '16 at 0:29
  • If your mac grep is weird consider brew install to get and use pcregrep instead. Jan 28 '20 at 23:42
25

To count occurences of a character per line:

$ awk -F 't' '{print NF-1, NR}'  input.txt
4 1
3 2
6 3

this sets field separator to the character that needs to be counted, then uses the fact that number of fields is one greater than number of separators.

To count occurences in a particular column cut out that column first:

$ cut -d '|' -f 2 input.txt | awk -F 't' '{print NF-1, NR}'
1 1
0 2
1 3

$ cut -d '|' -f 3 input.txt | awk -F 't' '{print NF-1, NR}'
2 1
1 2
4 3
4

One possible solution using perl:

Content of script.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

## Check arguments:
## 1.- Input file
## 2.- Char to search.
## 3.- (Optional) field to search. If blank, zero or bigger than number
##     of columns, default to search char in all the line.
(@ARGV == 2 || @ARGV == 3) or die qq(Usage: perl $0 input-file char [column]\n);

my ($char,$column);

## Get values or arguments.
if ( @ARGV == 3 ) {
        ($char, $column) = splice @ARGV, -2;
} else {
        $char = pop @ARGV;
        $column = 0;
}

## Check that $char must be a non-white space character and $column 
## only accept numbers.
die qq[Bad input\n] if $char !~ m/^\S$/ or $column !~ m/^\d+$/; 

print qq[count\tlineNum\n];

while ( <> ) {
        ## Remove last '\n'
        chomp;

        ## Get fields.
        my @f = split /\|/;

        ## If column is a valid one, select it to the search.
        if ( $column > 0 and $column <= scalar @f ) {
                $_ = $f[ $column - 1];
        }

        ## Count.
        my $count = eval qq[tr/$char/$char/];

        ## Print result.
        printf qq[%d\t%d\n], $count, $.;
}

The script accepts three parameters:

  1. Input file
  2. Char to search
  3. Column to search: If column is a bad digit, it searchs all the line.

Running the script without arguments:

perl script.pl
Usage: perl script.pl input-file char [column]

With arguments and its output:

Here 0 is a bad column, it searches all the line.

perl script.pl stores.dat 't' 0
count   lineNum
4       1
3       2
6       3

Here it searches in column 1.

perl script.pl stores.dat 't' 1
count   lineNum
0       1
2       2
0       3

Here it searches in column 3.

perl script.pl stores.dat 't' 3
count   lineNum
2       1
1       2
4       3

th is not a char.

perl script.pl stores.dat 'th' 3
Bad input
1
  • Like this a lot, but accepting the other answer for easier integration with bash
    – toop
    Dec 25 '11 at 13:09
4

No need for awk or perl, only with bash and standard Unix utilities:

cat file | tr -c -d "t\n" | cat -n |
  { echo "count   lineNum"
    while read num data; do
      test ${#data} -gt 0 && printf "%4d   %5d\n" ${#data} $num
    done; }

And for a particular column:

cut -d "|" -f 2 file | tr -c -d "t\n" | cat -n |
  { echo -e "count lineNum"
    while read num data; do
      test ${#data} -gt 0 && printf "%4d   %5d\n" ${#data} $num
    done; }

And we can even avoid tr and the cats:

echo "count   lineNum"
num=1
while read data; do
  new_data=${data//t/}
  count=$((${#data}-${#new_data}))
  test $count -gt 0 && printf "%4d   %5d\n" $count $num
  num=$(($num+1))
done < file

and event the cut:

echo "count   lineNum"
num=1; OLF_IFS=$IFS; IFS="|"
while read -a array_data; do
  data=${array_data[1]}
  new_data=${data//t/}
  count=$((${#data}-${#new_data}))
  test $count -gt 0 && printf "%4d   %5d\n" $count $num
  num=$(($num+1))
done < file
IFS=$OLF_IFS
3
awk '{gsub("[^t]",""); print length($0),NR;}' stores.dat

The call to gsub() deletes everything in the line that is not a t, then just print the length of what remains, and the current line number.

Want to do it just for column 2?

awk 'BEGIN{FS="|"} {gsub("[^t]","",$2); print NR,length($2);}' stores.dat
2
 $ cat -n test.txt
 1  test 1
 2  you want
 3  void
 4  you don't want
 5  ttttttttttt
 6  t t t t t t

 $ awk '{n=split($0,c,"t")-1;if (n!=0) print n,NR}' test.txt
 2 1
 1 2
 2 4
 11 5
 6 6
1
cat stores.dat | awk 'BEGIN {FS = "|"}; {print $1}' |  awk 'BEGIN {FS = "\t"}; {print NF}'

Where $1 would be a column number you want to count.

1

You could also split the line or field with "t" and check the length of the resulting array - 1. Set the col variable to 0 for the line or 1 through 3 for columns:

awk -F'|' -v col=0 -v OFS=$'\t' 'BEGIN {
    print "count", "lineNum"
}{
    split($col, a, "t"); print length(a) - 1, NR
}
' stores.dat
1
perl -e 'while(<>) { $count = tr/t//; print "$count ".++$x."\n"; }' stores.dat

Another perl answer yay! The tr/t// function returns the count of the number of times the translation occurred on that line, in other words the number of times tr found the character 't'. ++$x maintains the line number count.

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