Here is the problem. I need to write header file with two classes, say class A and class B.

in class A I have function that uses object of class B and vice versa, i.e. in class B I have function that uses objects of class A.

If A declared first then there would be error that class B has not been declared. How to deal with it? I try declare function of a class A after declaration of class B:

void classA::myfunc (classB *b);

But I got the error that function myfunc is not declared. Experienced people in C++, what to do?

Added: here is a good link about header

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you need a pointer to a class on a header, not the full object, just add a forward declaration, dont include the header of the pointer's class.

I'm sure that you just use pointers to access that classes that one have a reference to another, dont you? You know, because if you use instances, you got a instance looping. Use forward declarations.

Here's a example of how you can use forward declarations:

A.h

class B;
class C;
class D;
class E;

class A {
    B* pointer; //To just have a pointer to another object.
    void doThings(C* object); //if you just want to tell that a pointer of a object is a param
    D* getThings(); //if you wanna tell that a pointer of such class is a return.
    E invalid(); //This will cause an error, because you cant use forward declarations for full objects, only pointers. For this, you have to use #include "E.h".
};

To illustrate how can have a class that mentions one that pointers its type:

B.h

class A;
class B {
    A* pointer; //That can be done! But if you use a includes instead of the forward declarations, you'll have a include looping, since A includes B, and B includes A.
}

As mentioned by Tony Delroy (Many thanks to him) You should not ALWAYS use this design. It's provided by the C++ compiler, but its not a good practice. The best is to provide reference header, so your code would look like:

A.h

#include "B.fwd.h"
#include "C.fwd.h"
#include "D.fwd.h"
#include "E.fwd.h"

class A {
    B* pointer; //To just have a pointer to another object.
    void doThings(C* object); //if you just want to tell that a pointer of a object is a param
    D* getThings(); //if you wanna tell that a pointer of such class is a return.
    E invalid(); //This will cause an error, because you cant use forward declarations for full objects, only pointers. For this, you have to use #include "E.h".
};

and yours forward headers like this:

B.fwd.h:

class B;

In your fwds, you should have your class forward declaration, and any typedefs that comes with it.

I'm not mentioning the #pragma once, or the #ifndef B.H... you know they'll be there :D

Your code would be on a standard defined by <iosfwd> and better to maintain, specially, if they are templates.

  • That's not only for pointers, also for methods parameters and return type. – Geoffroy Dec 26 '11 at 1:29
  • Yes I know, but i did not said that it was just for pointers, i said that if you dont need the full object, that is, the implementation. And ah, sorry me, but why did you marked my answer and @boydc one as not useful? this is not true, lol – Gustavo Maciel Dec 26 '11 at 1:35
  • The declaration, not the implementation :) And also if you need to know the object size, typically when declaring instance variable of that type. – Geoffroy Dec 26 '11 at 1:38
  • 1
    forward declarations are a great technique! I use them routinely. Not sure why someone voted down this answer tbh. – Nerdtron Dec 26 '11 at 1:39
  • 1
    -1: your "holy rule" is bad practice. If a forward declaration of B is needed, best practice is to provide a forward declaration header e.g. B.fwd.h (as per the Standard library's iosfwd). This is important because 1) the forward declaration should be maintained with the other B files and included from them to provide compile-time consistency checks, 2) code changes such as a move to template <typename T> class Basic_B { ... }; typedef Basic_B<int> B; won't break client code. – Tony Delroy Dec 26 '11 at 2:12

Short answer:

class classA;

Then you defined your classB and then the declaration of classA.

This is called forward-declaration, and is there to solve your problem :)

  • 1
    Typically you want to declare the common classes, as needed, in a common header. Precompiled headers or a common library header (with enums and classes and such) work well for this. – ssube Dec 26 '11 at 1:28
you can do like this:

try to add a uncomplete decleration of a class before you use it with a ref or ptr

classA.h:


class classB;

class classA {
        void fun(classB * b);
}


classB.h:

class classA;

class classB {
        void fun(classA * a);
}


classA.cpp:

#include "classA.h"
#include "classB.h"

...

classB.cpp:

#include "classA.h"
#include "classB.h"

...
  • Try to explain what you do. – Geoffroy Dec 26 '11 at 1:29
  • explained ..... – boydc Dec 26 '11 at 1:32
  • Not really no :) And try to format your answer correctly :) – Geoffroy Dec 26 '11 at 1:34
  • Great answer, i think that one completes the mine. You should do forward declarations in headers, and header includes in .cpps (: – Gustavo Maciel Dec 26 '11 at 1:44

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.