89

How can I filter the git log to show only my changes (excluding the changes committed by other developers)?

106

You can filter the log by the author for example, so you can filter by your name :

git log --author="YourName"

or by committer :

 git log --committer="YourName"
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Also, the results can be made to look more pretty with any number of combinations git log --author='Your Name' --oneline --pretty=format:'%h%x09%an%x09%ad%x09%s' --date=short or git log --pretty=format:"%h%x09%an%x09%ad%x09%s" --author="Your Name" – sawe Jan 13 '14 at 9:58
  • also -i enables case-insensitive-regex for the value of --author – Trevor Boyd Smith Apr 12 '19 at 19:09
29

You should use the --author flag to the git-log command.

Like so:

git log --author="You Name"

Part of name is also working:

git log --author=Name

However if you want to use in a generic script like in this tip, you could do it like this:

git log --author="$(git config user.name)"

You could then make an alias:

git config --global alias.mylog '!git log --author="$(git config user.name)"'

You could then just type: git mylog and see your commits only.

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  • git log --author="$(git config user.name)" does not seem to work on Windows. Any suggestions? – Andreas Presthammer Oct 12 '16 at 7:03
  • @AndreasPresthammer I'm not sure if you are still wondering about the issue, but if your issue is with setting up an alias, but if you are setting up this alias in a text editor rather than through git bash, you may be having an issue with unescaped double-quotes (at least, I was having such an issue). In my .gitconfig on Windows, I have these aliases set up, and they are working for me. my-history = !git log --author=\"$(git config user.name)\" – Nelson O Jun 19 '17 at 18:42

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