82
typeof(string).IsPrimitive == false
typeof(int).IsPrimitive == true
typeof(MyClass).IsClass == true
typeof(string).IsClass == true
typeof(string).IsByRef == false
typeof(MyClass).IsByRef == true // correction: should be false (see comments below)

I have a method that instantiates a new instance of T and, if it's a "complex" class, fills its properties from a set of source data values.

(a) If T is a simple type (e.g. a string or an int or anything else similar), a quick conversion from the source data to T is to be performed.

(b) If T is a class (but not something simple like string), then I'll use Activator.CreateInstance and do a bit of reflection to populate the fields.

Is there a quick and simple way to tell if I should use method (a) or method (b)? This logic will be used inside a generic method with T as the type argument.

7
  • 1
    string, despite having a lowercase name in C#, is not a simple type, but rather a wrapper around a char array. string is converted to String internally by the C# compiler.
    – Powerlord
    May 14, 2009 at 15:41
  • 2
    I'm curious -- how did you get that last line to result in true? May 14, 2009 at 16:52
  • because class instances are passed by reference... May 14, 2009 at 22:33
  • 3
    @NathanRidley: IsByRef is for the following situation: you have a MethodInfo for method void A(ref int x); you obtain the ParameterInfo for x and ask it for the parameter's type. The IsByRef property of that Type should be true. The GetElementType method then returns typeof(int). I cannot think of a way to use typeof(C) and get a ref parameter type out of that, hence my question. Feb 27, 2014 at 14:50
  • 2
    Your supposition that IsByRef tells you whether a value of a type is passed by reference is clearly incorrect because you stated that IsByRef was false for string, but clearly strings are passed by reference. To tell whether a type is passed by reference or by value you should use IsValueType. Feb 27, 2014 at 14:53

7 Answers 7

147

String is probably a special case.

I think I would do.....

bool IsSimple(Type type)
{
    return type.IsPrimitive 
      || type.Equals(typeof(string));
}

Edit:

Sometimes you need to cover some more cases, like enums and decimals. Enums are a special kind of type in C#. Decimals are structs like any other. The problem with the structs is that they may be complex, they may be user defined types, they may be just a number. So you don't have any other chance than knowing them to differentiate.

bool IsSimple(Type type)
{
  return type.IsPrimitive 
    || type.IsEnum
    || type.Equals(typeof(string))
    || type.Equals(typeof(decimal));
}

Handling nullable counterparts are also a bit tricky. The nullable itself is a struct.

bool IsSimple(Type type)
{
  if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
  {
    // nullable type, check if the nested type is simple.
    return IsSimple(type.GetGenericArguments()[0]);
  }
  return type.IsPrimitive 
    || type.IsEnum
    || type.Equals(typeof(string))
    || type.Equals(typeof(decimal));
}

Test:

Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(string)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(int)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(decimal)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(float)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(StringComparison)));  // enum
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(int?)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(decimal?)));
Assert.IsTrue(IsSimple(typeof(StringComparison?)));
Assert.IsFalse(IsSimple(typeof(object)));
Assert.IsFalse(IsSimple(typeof(Point)));  // struct in System.Drawing
Assert.IsFalse(IsSimple(typeof(Point?)));
Assert.IsFalse(IsSimple(typeof(StringBuilder))); // reference type

Note to .NET Core

As DucoJ points out in his answer, some of the used methods are not available on the class Type in .NET core anymore.

Fixed code (I hope it works, I couldn't try myself. Otherwise please comment):

bool IsSimple(Type type)
{
  var typeInfo = type.GetTypeInfo();
  if (typeInfo.IsGenericType && typeInfo.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
  {
    // nullable type, check if the nested type is simple.
    return IsSimple(typeInfo.GetGenericArguments()[0]);
  }
  return typeInfo.IsPrimitive 
    || typeInfo.IsEnum
    || type.Equals(typeof(string))
    || type.Equals(typeof(decimal));
}
11
  • John Saunders, below, makes a valid point, so in that light I think your answer is probably the best one for my case. May 14, 2009 at 15:32
  • 5
    Depending on your needs, you might need to add || type.Equals(typeof(datetime)) May 31, 2019 at 8:22
  • 1
    As well as || type.Equals(typeof(TimeSpan)).
    – NetMage
    Jun 10, 2019 at 23:50
  • 1
    DateTime also needs to be checked for Sep 11, 2020 at 1:28
  • 1
    If you have a look at the learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… the Enum and Decimal is a part of ValueType so you could simplify what the IsSimple returns to just return typeInfo.IsPrimitive || type.Equals(typeof(string)) || type.IsSubclassOf(typeof(ValueType));
    – GoldenAge
    Mar 17, 2021 at 12:46
20

Using a solution based on TypeConverter is also a nice and simple way to model this.

Say you have this implementation for instance:

public static bool IsSimple(this Type type) =>
    TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type).CanConvertFrom(typeof(string));

This returns true for:

  • All primitive types
  • All enums
  • strings
  • decimals
  • DateTime
  • DateTimeOffset
  • TimeSpan
  • Uri
  • Guid
  • Nullable<> of any of the types above
  • numerous other types that have native TypeConverters implemented (see here on the Derived section)

This approach works well since most frameworks support TypeConverters natively, like XML and Json serialization libraries, and you can then use the same converter to parse the values while reading.

17

In Addition to Stefan Steinegger answer: In .NET Core the .IsPrimitive etc. are no longer members of Type, they are now members of TypeInfo. So his solution will then become:

bool IsSimple(TypeInfo type)
{
    if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() ==     typeof(Nullable<>))
    {
        // nullable type, check if the nested type is simple.
        return IsSimple((type.GetGenericArguments()[0]).GetTypeInfo());
    }
    return type.IsPrimitive
      || type.IsEnum
      || type.Equals(typeof(string))
      || type.Equals(typeof(decimal));
}
3
  • If somebody with enough rep could post this as a comment under Stefan Steinegger's post, it might safe other people time.
    – DucoJ
    Aug 17, 2016 at 13:44
  • At least in the version of netstandard I am using (1.6) type.Equals(typeof(x)) results in a compile error because the type variable is a System.Reflection.TypeInfo, which does not derive from System.Type. Instead you have to use type.Equals(typeof(x).GetTypeInfo()). Sep 11, 2017 at 18:44
  • @DucoJ: Thanks for this. I didn't know that. I added this information to my answer. Mar 26, 2018 at 10:40
7

There is a more general type than primitive, the ValueType encompasses a lot more than primitive, such as enums, decimal, and other such things ValueType. Below is a function I wrote to identify complex types, that may fit your needs.

    public static bool IsComplex(Type typeIn)
    {
        if (typeIn.IsSubclassOf(typeof(System.ValueType)) || typeIn.Equals(typeof(string))) //|| typeIn.IsPrimitive
            return false;
        else
            return true;

    }
2
  • 3
    There is also typeIn.IsValueType. "IsComplex" is misleading in this case, because a struct (value type) can be complex by having many properties, which for instance can point to reference types. Oct 9, 2015 at 4:50
  • I improved my answer. There is no single correct answer to this, because it depends very much on what is needed in the specific case. Sometimes you can handle all the value types the same, sometimes you can not. Oct 9, 2015 at 5:39
2

Sorry to resurrect a really old thread, but since this still ranks high on web searches in Google, want to get a more direct and effective solution added:

if(System.Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(int)) == TypeCode.Object) {
    // Do what you will...
}
3
  • 9
    You should explain a little better what's going on here, i.e. why performing that particular check is useful. Sep 3, 2015 at 2:19
  • 1
    When System.Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(myValue)) is TypeCode.Object, "myValue" has a non primitive type. Else there are a dozen of different primitive types. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.typecode(v=vs.110).aspx Jan 6, 2017 at 21:40
  • 1
    This doesn't work so well for Nullables.... >System.Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(int?)) >Object
    – zaitsman
    Oct 3, 2017 at 23:17
0

Modified Mauser's answer a little bit added a method to check whether a property is an collection.

public static class TypeExtensions
{
    public static bool IsComplex(this Type type)
    {
        return !type.IsValueType && type != typeof(string);
    }

    public static bool IsCollection(this Type type)
    {
        var collectionTypeName = typeof(ICollection<>).Name;
        return type.Name == collectionTypeName || type.GetInterface(collectionTypeName) != null;
    }
}

Here inside IsCollection(..) we can even keep IEnumerable, but string also inherit IEnumerable. so if you are using IEnumerable, add a check for string also!

public static class TypeExtensions
    {

        public static bool IsComplex(this Type type)
        {
            return !type.IsValueType && type != typeof(string);
        }



        public static bool IsCustomComplex(this Type type)
        {
            var elementType = type.GetCustomElementType();
            return elementType != null && elementType.IsComplex();
        }

        public static Type GetCustomElementType(this Type type, object value)
        {
            return value != null 
                ? value.GetType().GetCustomElementType() 
                : type.GetCustomElementType();
        }

        public static Type GetCustomElementType(this Type type)
        {
            return type.IsCollection()
                ? type.IsArray
                    ? type.GetElementType()
                    : type.GetGenericArguments()[0]
                : type;
        }


        public static bool IsCustomComplex(this Type type, object value)
        {
            return value != null
                ? value.GetType().IsCustomComplex()
                : type.IsCustomComplex();
        }


        public static bool IsCollection(this Type type)
        {
            var collectionTypeName = typeof(IEnumerable<>).Name;
            return (type.Name == collectionTypeName || type.GetInterface(typeof(IEnumerable<>).Name) != null ||
                    type.IsArray) && type != typeof(string);
        }

        public static bool HasDefaultConstructor(this Type type)
        {
            return type.IsValueType || type.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null;
        }

    }
-1

Strings aren't primitives, if I recall correctly. even though there is a keyword for it, a string is an object. Your call to IsPrimitive will accurately tell you if something is a primitive.

3
  • Yes but strings are assigned like primitives and in most cases are treated (from the outside) as though they are primitives. May 14, 2009 at 15:23
  • 1
    Strings are kind of a unique beast in this regard. I think Stefan's suggestion of special handling for them is the best approach. May 14, 2009 at 15:25
  • This does not answer the question at hand and would be better suited as a comment.
    – julealgon
    Nov 30, 2020 at 19:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.