106

I'm having a heck of a time with this particular CSS selector which does not want to work when I add :not(:empty) to it. It seems to work fine with any combination of the other selectors:

input:not(:empty):not(:focus):invalid { border-color: #A22; box-shadow: none }

If I remove the :not(:empty) part, it works just fine. Even if I change the selector to input:not(:empty) it still won't select input fields which have text typed into them. Is this broken or am I just not allowed to use :empty within a :not() selector?

The only other thing I can think of is that browsers are still saying that the element is empty because it has no children, just a "value" per say. Does the :empty selector not have separate functionality for an input element versus a regular element? This doesn't seem probable though because using :empty on a field and typing something into it will cause the alternate effects to go away (because it is no longer empty).

Tested in Firefox 8 and Chrome.

3
  • Can you post the relevant code? – Virendra Dec 26 '11 at 21:41
  • 2
    Can I quote you part of the API reference for the :empty selector: "Some other elements, on the other hand, are empty (i.e. have no children) by definition: <input>, <img>, <br>, and <hr>, for example." – David says reinstate Monica Dec 26 '11 at 21:43
  • @Virendra: That is the relevant code, but I've added the actual CSS rules to it. If I remove the :not(:empty), the red border works as expected for an input that is not in focus but is invalid. – animuson Dec 26 '11 at 21:43

13 Answers 13

159

Being a void element, an <input> element is considered empty by the HTML definition of "empty", since the content model of all void elements is always empty. So they will always match the :empty pseudo-class, whether or not they have a value. This is also why their value is represented by an attribute in the start tag, rather than text content within start and end tags.

Also, from the Selectors spec:

The :empty pseudo-class represents an element that has no children at all. In terms of the document tree, only element nodes and content nodes (such as DOM text nodes, CDATA nodes, and entity references) whose data has a non-zero length must be considered as affecting emptiness;

Consequently, input:not(:empty) will never match anything in a proper HTML document. (It would still work in a hypothetical XML document that defines an <input> element that can accept text or child elements.)

I don't think you can style empty <input> fields dynamically using just CSS (i.e. rules that apply whenever a field is empty, and don't once text is entered). You can select initially empty fields if they have an empty value attribute (input[value=""]) or lack the attribute altogether (input:not([value])), but that's about it.

5
  • Hmm, I don't remember what I did to get the effects to go away with just the input:empty. Perhaps I typed something wrong, who knows. – animuson Dec 26 '11 at 21:47
  • 11
    Re last paragraph in the answer, input elements can be styled dynamically (in sufficiently modern browsers) if you can use the required attribute in HTML markup. Then you can use :valid and :invalid in CSS to test for nonempty vs. empty value of the control. See stackoverflow.com/questions/16952526/… – Jukka K. Korpela Jun 6 '13 at 8:08
  • 1
    @JukkaK.Korpela unless you are also using pattern attribute. – WORMSS Sep 1 '16 at 5:19
  • 2
    input:not([value='']) will select an input with a value ;) – Chris Love Aug 8 '19 at 19:13
  • 1
    @Chris Love: Inputs with an initial (on page load) value. – BoltClock Sep 1 '19 at 18:54
55

It is possible with inline javascript onkeyup="this.setAttribute('value', this.value);" & input:not([value=""]):not(:focus):invalid

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mhsyfvv9/

input:not([value=""]):not(:focus):invalid{
  background-color: tomato;
}
<input 
  type="email" 
  value="" 
  placeholder="valid mail" 
  onchange="this.setAttribute('value', this.value);" />

1
  • Isn't the onchange event better in this case? Since you can edit input values with Right click > Cut as well (for example). Tested it: works fine. – Derk Jan Speelman Mar 21 '19 at 10:37
48

You could try using :placeholder-shown...

input {
  padding: 10px 15px;
  font-size: 16px;
  border-radius: 5px;
  border: 2px solid lightblue;
  outline: 0;
  font-weight:bold;
  transition: border-color 200ms;
  font-family: sans-serif;
}

.validation {
  opacity: 0;
  font-size: 12px;
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: crimson;
  transition: opacity;
}

input:required:valid {
  border-color: forestgreen;
}

input:required:invalid:not(:placeholder-shown) {
  border-color: crimson;
}

input:required:invalid:not(:placeholder-shown) + .validation {
  opacity: 1;
}

  
<input type="email" placeholder="e-mail" required>
<div class="validation">Not valid</span>

no great support though... caniuse

3
  • 3
    pretty good support though...caniuse – Reggie Pinkham Apr 10 '17 at 3:39
  • Good old Internet Explorer (Y) – rorymorris89 May 30 '17 at 12:54
  • @rorymorris89 even latest version of EDGE doesn't support :-( – Mo. Jun 11 '17 at 21:24
15

.floating-label-input {
  position: relative;
  height:60px;
}
.floating-label-input input {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  position: relative;
  background: transparent;
  border: 0 none;
  outline: none;
  vertical-align: middle;
  font-size: 20px;
  font-weight: bold;
  padding-top: 10px;
}
.floating-label-input label {
  position: absolute;
  top: calc(50% - 5px);
  font-size: 22px;
  left: 0;
  color: #000;
  transition: all 0.3s;
}
.floating-label-input input:focus ~ label, .floating-label-input input:focus ~ label, .floating-label-input input:valid ~ label {
  top: 0;
  font-size: 15px;
  color: #33bb55;
}
.floating-label-input .line {
  position: absolute;
  height: 1px;
  width: 100%;
  bottom: 0;
  background: #000;
  left: 0;
}
.floating-label-input .line:after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  width: 0;
  background: #33bb55;
  height: 1px;
  transition: all 0.5s;
}
.floating-label-input input:focus ~ .line:after, .floating-label-input input:focus ~ .line:after, .floating-label-input input:valid ~ .line:after {
  width: 100%;
}
<div class="floating-label-input">
      <input type="text" id="id" required/>
      <label for="id" >User ID</label>
      <span class="line"></span>
</div>

7

You may approach this differently; omit the use of the :empty pseudo-class and utilize input events to detect a significant value in the <input> field and style it accordingly:

var inputs = document.getElementsByTagName('input');

for (var i = 0; i < inputs.length; i++) {
  var input = inputs[i];
  input.addEventListener('input', function() {
    var bg = this.value ? 'green' : 'red';
    this.style.backgroundColor = bg;
  });
}
body {
  padding: 40px;
}
#inputList li {
  list-style-type: none;
  padding-bottom: 1.5em;
}
#inputList li input,
#inputList li label {
  float: left;
  width: 10em;
}
#inputList li input {
  color: white;
  background-color: red;
}
#inputList li label {
  text-align: right;
  padding-right: 1em;
}
<ul id="inputList">
  <li>
    <label for="username">Enter User Name:</label>
    <input type="text" id="username" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <label for="password">Enter Password:</label>
    <input type="password" id="password" />
  </li>
</ul>

Related


Disclaimer: note that input events are currently experimental, and probably not widely supported.

5

Since placeholder disappear on input, you can use:

input:placeholder-shown{
    //rules for not empty input
}
0
2

pure css solution

input::-webkit-input-placeholder {
    opacity: 1;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0s;
    transition: opacity 0s;
    text-align: right;
}
/* Chrome <=56, Safari < 10 */
input:-moz-placeholder {
    opacity: 1;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0s;
    transition: opacity 0s;
    text-align: right;
}
/* FF 4-18 */
input::-moz-placeholder {
    opacity: 1;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0s;
    transition: opacity 0s;
    text-align: right;
}
/* FF 19-51 */
input:-ms-input-placeholder {
    opacity: 1;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0s;
    transition: opacity 0s;
    text-align: right;
}
/* IE 10+ */
input::placeholder {
    opacity: 1;
    transition: opacity 0s;
    text-align: right;
}
/* Modern Browsers */

*:focus::-webkit-input-placeholder {
   opacity: 0;
   text-align: left;
}
/* Chrome <=56, Safari < 10 */
*:focus:-moz-placeholder {
    opacity: 0;
    text-align: left;
}
/* FF 4-18 */
*:focus::-moz-placeholder {
    opacity: 0;
    text-align: left;
}
/* FF 19-50 */
*:focus:-ms-input-placeholder {
    opacity: 0;
    text-align: left;
}
/* IE 10+ */
*:focus::placeholder {
    opacity: 0;
    text-align: left;
}
/* Modern Browsers */

input:focus {
    text-align: left;
}
1

I was trying to copy Gmail Login. When you click on "Email or phone" and type something on it the label translatesY(-38px) and scales(0.75).
What I did:-

<input type='email' class='email' placeholder=' ' />

Then In my CSS

input:not(:placeholder-shown){
//put my styles here and I got the expected results
}

If you try it and find any problem. Please share it.

0

Another pure CSS solution

.form{
  position:relative;
  display:inline-block;
}
.form input{
  margin-top:10px;
}
.form label{
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
    top:0;
    opacity:0;
    transition:all 1s ease;
}
input:not(:placeholder-shown) + label{
    top:-10px;
    opacity:1;
}
<div class="form">
    <input type="text" id="inputFName" placeholder="Firstname">
    <label class="label" for="inputFName">Firstname</label>
</div>
<div class="form">
    <input type="text" id="inputLName" placeholder="Lastname">
    <label class="label" for="inputLName">Lastname</label>
</div>

-1
input:not(:invalid){
 border: 1px red solid;
}

// or 

input:not(:focus):not(:invalid){
 border: 1px red solid;
}
1
  • 2
    When adding an answer to an eleven year old question with ten existing answers it is really important to add some explanation of how and why your answer works and to point out what new aspect of the question your answer addresses. If the answer depends on something that has changed since the question was asked point that out as well. – Jason Aller May 22 '20 at 2:25
-1

You can use &:valid on your input and that make the trick.

-2

This should work in modern browsers:

input[value]:not([value=""])

It selects all inputs with value attribute and then select inputs with non empty value among them.

1
  • 11
    This would not be dynamic, though. It would only select input elements which have the attribute defined as value="". Typing/removing something in the box would not cause any changes. – animuson Apr 18 '13 at 23:18
-2
input:not([value=""])

This works because we are selecting the input only when there isn't an empty string.

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