51

I've got an object with a short string attribute, and a long multi-line string attribute. I want to write the short string as a YAML quoted scalar, and the multi-line string as a literal scalar:

my_obj.short = "Hello"
my_obj.long = "Line1\nLine2\nLine3"

I'd like the YAML to look like this:

short: "Hello"
long: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3

How can I instruct PyYAML to do this? If I call yaml.dump(my_obj), it produces a dict-like output:

{long: 'line1

    line2

    line3

    ', short: Hello}

(Not sure why long is double-spaced like that...)

Can I dictate to PyYAML how to treat my attributes? I'd like to affect both the order and style.

5 Answers 5

60

Falling in love with @lbt's approach, I got this code:

import yaml

def str_presenter(dumper, data):
  if len(data.splitlines()) > 1:  # check for multiline string
    return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data, style='|')
  return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data)

yaml.add_representer(str, str_presenter)

# to use with safe_dump:
yaml.representer.SafeRepresenter.add_representer(str, str_presenter)

It makes every multiline string be a block literal.

I was trying to avoid the monkey patching part. Full credit to @lbt and @J.F.Sebastian.

8
  • 2
    nice approach that allows to avoid tagging input strings explicitly. You could use is_multiline = lambda s: len(s.splitlines()) > 1 that recognizes Unicode newlines automatically and it doesn't return true for a single line.
    – jfs
    Nov 26, 2015 at 17:49
  • 1
    @J.F.Sebastian It's nice to see that nice trick. Now the code looks much better. Many thanks!
    – xenosoz
    Nov 30, 2015 at 23:22
  • 1
    hmm, the style='|' doesn't seem to affect pyyaml
    – Jason S
    Oct 13, 2017 at 20:41
  • 1
    @jfs Yes but the pyyaml emitter will print test\n on two lines surrounded by single quotes, so if the goal of this exercise is to use block style rather than quotes if a string contains newlines, then we have to handle this case as if it were multiline (whether that's technically correct or not).
    – oulenz
    Jan 16, 2018 at 11:02
  • 5
    Instead of splitlines, simply testing for if '\n' in data is cheaper and does the same thing. Aug 11, 2019 at 10:43
33

Based on Any yaml libraries in Python that support dumping of long strings as block literals or folded blocks?

import yaml
from collections import OrderedDict

class quoted(str):
    pass

def quoted_presenter(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data, style='"')
yaml.add_representer(quoted, quoted_presenter)

class literal(str):
    pass

def literal_presenter(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data, style='|')
yaml.add_representer(literal, literal_presenter)

def ordered_dict_presenter(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_dict(data.items())
yaml.add_representer(OrderedDict, ordered_dict_presenter)

d = OrderedDict(short=quoted("Hello"), long=literal("Line1\nLine2\nLine3\n"))

print(yaml.dump(d))

Output

short: "Hello"
long: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3
6
  • 5
    any way to do this so that it does not affect the global yaml state but it does affect one individual call to dump()?
    – Jason S
    Oct 13, 2017 at 20:25
  • @JasonS: it is a good separate question. You could try passing you own Dumper class to yaml.dump with overriden represent_scalar, represent_dict methods.
    – jfs
    Oct 14, 2017 at 5:37
  • For some reason this doesn't work in this instance: gist.github.com/retorquere/c43b5394c5e45b4c5b54b46479725e3c . Any ideas?
    – retorquere
    May 9, 2019 at 16:30
  • This is a great answer and it works for me so thanks! ... but I would like to add that this works with yaml.dump() but doesn't work with yaml.safe_dump(). Unless if there's a way to get this to work with yaml.safe_dump() that I missed.
    – cbautista
    Dec 19, 2019 at 18:56
  • 1
    To use with safe_dump(): yaml.representer.SafeRepresenter.add_representer(OrderedDict, ordered_dict_presenter)
    – jwatson0
    Aug 26, 2021 at 18:27
14

I wanted any input with a \n in it to be a block literal. Using the code in yaml/representer.py as a base I got:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import yaml

def should_use_block(value):
    for c in u"\u000a\u000d\u001c\u001d\u001e\u0085\u2028\u2029":
        if c in value:
            return True
    return False

def my_represent_scalar(self, tag, value, style=None):
    if style is None:
        if should_use_block(value):
             style='|'
        else:
            style = self.default_style

    node = yaml.representer.ScalarNode(tag, value, style=style)
    if self.alias_key is not None:
        self.represented_objects[self.alias_key] = node
    return node


a={'short': "Hello", 'multiline': """Line1
Line2
Line3
""", 'multiline-unicode': u"""Lêne1
Lêne2
Lêne3
"""}

print(yaml.dump(a))
print(yaml.dump(a, allow_unicode=True))
yaml.representer.BaseRepresenter.represent_scalar = my_represent_scalar
print(yaml.dump(a))
print(yaml.dump(a, allow_unicode=True))

Output

{multiline: 'Line1

    Line2

    Line3

    ', multiline-unicode: "L\xEAne1\nL\xEAne2\nL\xEAne3\n", short: Hello}

{multiline: 'Line1

    Line2

    Line3

    ', multiline-unicode: 'Lêne1

    Lêne2

    Lêne3

    ', short: Hello}

After override

multiline: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3
multiline-unicode: "L\xEAne1\nL\xEAne2\nL\xEAne3\n"
short: Hello

multiline: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3
multiline-unicode: |
  Lêne1
  Lêne2
  Lêne3
short: Hello
6

You can use ruamel.yaml and its RoundTripLoader/Dumper (disclaimer: I am the author of that package) apart from doing what you want, it supports the YAML 1.2 specification (from 2009), and has several other improvements:

import sys
from ruamel.yaml import YAML

yaml_str = """\
short: "Hello"  # does keep the quotes, but need to tell the loader
long: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3
folded: >
  some like
  explicit folding
  of scalars
  for readability
"""

yaml = YAML()
yaml.preserve_quotes = True
data = yaml.load(yaml_str)
yaml.dump(data, sys.stdout)

gives:

short: "Hello"  # does keep the quotes, but need to tell the loader
long: |
  Line1
  Line2
  Line3
folded: >
  some like
  explicit folding
  of scalars
  for readability

(including the comment, starting in the same column as before)

You can also create this output starting from scratch, but then you do need to provide the extra information e.g. the explicit positions on where to fold.

2

It's worth noting that pyyaml disallows trailing spaces in block scalars and will force content into double-quoted format. It seems a lot of folk have run into this issue. If you don't care about being able to round-trip the data, this will strip out those trailing spaces:

def str_presenter(dumper, data):
    if len(data.splitlines()) > 1 or '\n' in data:  
        text_list = [line.rstrip() for line in data.splitlines()]
        fixed_data = "\n".join(text_list)
        return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', fixed_data, style='|')
    return dumper.represent_scalar('tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data)

yaml.add_representer(str, str_presenter)
1
  • For some reason, some of my string values had '\n' as string itself, so I had to check and split on '\\n' and then rstrip and join on '\n'. Sep 28, 2022 at 3:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.