150

How do I correct the error from MySQL 'you can only have one auto increment column'.

CREATE TABLE book (
   id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL,
   accepted_terms BIT(1) NOT NULL,
   accepted_privacy BIT(1) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

5 Answers 5

160

My MySQL says "Incorrect table definition; there can be only one auto column and it must be defined as a key" So when I added primary key as below it started working:

CREATE TABLE book (
   id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL,
   accepted_terms BIT(1) NOT NULL,
   accepted_privacy BIT(1) NOT NULL,
   primary key (id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
3
  • 10
    What is the correct course of action if the column is part of a composite key?
    – Nubcake
    Sep 20, 2017 at 18:13
  • 2
    What is the syntax when altering the table? Mar 1, 2019 at 20:00
  • 4
    @MikeHarrison looks like you can just put ALTER TABLE book ADD id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, ADD PRIMARY KEY (id);
    – suxur
    Jul 25, 2019 at 16:17
48

The full error message sounds:

ERROR 1075 (42000): Incorrect table definition; there can be only one auto column and it must be defined as a key

So add primary key to the auto_increment field:

CREATE TABLE book (
   id INT AUTO_INCREMENT primary key NOT NULL,
   accepted_terms BIT(1) NOT NULL,
   accepted_privacy BIT(1) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
22

Note also that "key" does not necessarily mean primary key. Something like this will work:

CREATE TABLE book (
    isbn             BIGINT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    id               INT    NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    accepted_terms   BIT(1) NOT NULL,
    accepted_privacy BIT(1) NOT NULL,
    INDEX(id)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

This is a contrived example and probably not the best idea, but it can be very useful in certain cases.

5
  • 2
    This helped me in a situation where I wanted to define a composite key for easy updating but I also wanted to have an auto-incrementing ID for debugging purposes. Is there anything I should be aware of in terms of risk, apart from slightly slower writes possibly? Mar 14, 2019 at 2:18
  • 3
    @Mattias No, I don't believe there's any particular risk. This is intentionally supported, with the auto column being the primary key purely by convention (and for simplicity). Mar 15, 2019 at 3:52
  • You can also use UNIQUE key, or any other key listed here - c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/65fc13/working-with-keys-in-mysql/…. May 25, 2021 at 20:18
  • This gives me "Multiple primary key defined"
    – AlxVallejo
    Mar 8 at 17:11
  • Unlikely, since there's only one primary key. Works just fine here on 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, and 8.0 @AlxVallejo: dbfiddle.uk/… Mar 8 at 22:56
6
CREATE TABLE book (
   id INT AUTO_INCREMENT primary key NOT NULL,
   accepted_terms BIT(1) NOT NULL,
   accepted_privacy BIT(1) NOT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
0
0

This happens with you because in the case that you didn't create a primary key, SEQUELIZE will automatically generate a primary key with a default name id. Which causes a duplication because you already created one and SEQUELIZE created one too. But when you defined id as a primary key. SEQUELIZE didn't create the default id primary key.

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