5

Here's the code that I have a problem with:

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() :
        memberArray{Bar(1), Bar(3), Bar(2)}
    {}
    struct Bar {
        Bar(int param1) {  }
    };
private:
    std::array<Bar,3> memberArray;
//  Bar memberArray[3];    // Using a raw array like this instead compiles fine..
};

I'm using GCC 4.6.1, and compiling for c++11. How should I initialise my std::array?

8
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/8646088/… Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 15:49
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit that's not a dupe... he's trying to initialize a member, but that question initializes a local variable. Braces can be omitted for the latter but not for the former. Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 15:44
  • @Johannes: I never said that it was a dup. I said it was related. Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 21:03
  • @Ligh you didn't say it was a dupe but you are in the close-voters list of ppl who voted for "closed as exact duplicate" and there is only one possible duplicate listed above. So I assumed you to agree it is a dupe. Do I miss anything? Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 21:22
  • @JohannesSchaub-litb: You missed that the question in my comment is not the same question that was dupe-voted. Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 22:37

5 Answers 5

6

Since array<T, N> is actually a struct, the fully braced version needs {{ .. }} (the inner ones are for the array member of the array<T, N> object). The spec does not allow brace elision here. It only allows it in a declaration of the form

Type var = { ... };

So you have to use fully braced syntax

Foo() :
    memberArray{{Bar(1), Bar(3), Bar(2)}}
{}

This is not a GCC bug, but required by the spec.

24
  • 1
    @TonyK : We're discussing what is or isn't legal syntax, not compiler implementation deficiencies.
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 20:32
  • 1
    @TonyK : Yes, to an extent, since the fact that it doesn't compile in that version of GCC merely indicates a bug in that version of GCC, and has no bearing on the validity of the answer.
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 20:43
  • 2
    @TonyK : Don't take everything so personally -- no one's giving you "stick". The standard says this answer is correct; any given compiler's behavior is irrelevant.
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 21:16
  • 1
    @TonyK : I don't use a C++11 compiler, but I'm capable of reading normative text and understanding it. Are you satisfied now?
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 21:52
  • 1
    @ildjarn yes, GCC4.7 gets my code right, and gives a warning for TonyK's code, and an error for the OP's code. As for the different behavior regarding TonyK's and the OP's code, I filed a GCC PR: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=51689 Commented Dec 27, 2011 at 22:24
2

As a workaround, you can have a function return an instance of this array.

#include <array>

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() :
        memberArray(makeMemberArray())
    {}
    struct Bar {
        Bar(int param1) {  }
    };
private:
    std::array<Bar,3> memberArray;
//  Bar memberArray[3];    // Using a raw array like this instead compiles fine..

    static std::array<Bar, 3> makeMemberArray() { 
      std::array<Bar,3> a = {Bar(1), Bar(2), Bar(3)}; 
      return a; 
    }
};

I think uniform initialization is supposed to allow what you are doing, except it might not be implemented by the compiler.

0

Building on Johannes Schaub - litb's answer... at least GCC will allow you to use an abbreviated syntax (leaving out the, pointless, class name):

Foo() :
    memberArray{{ {1}, {3}, {2} }}
{}

instead of

Foo() :
    memberArray{{Bar(1), Bar(3), Bar(2)}}
{}

I, personally, only use something like the second version when I'm initializing an array of polymorphic pointers:

Foo() :
    memberArray{{
        dynamic_cast<Bar*>(new BarA(1)),
        dynamic_cast<Bar*>(new BarB(3)),
        dynamic_cast<Bar*>(new BarC(2))
    }}
{}
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <array>
#include <iostream>

void test1(){ printf("hello 0\n");}
void test2(){printf("hello 1\n");}
void test3(){printf("hello 2\n");}



typedef void (*functionPointerType)(); //from fastled demoreel100 was   typedef void (*SimplePatternList[])();

    void (*functptr[])() = { test1, test2, test3 } ; //classic way
    std::array<functionPointerType, 3> funcList{ {test1, test2, test3} }; //  double-braces required in C++11 prior to




class FuncContainClass {
public:
std::array<functionPointerType, 3> funcList; 


};

FuncContainClass funcClass;

int main()
{

funcClass.funcList[1] = &test2;
funcClass.funcList[1]();



functptr[0]();

std::cout << funcList.size() << std::endl;
funcList[1]();
    return 0;
}

`

I found this post because I was simply trying to have an std::array of functions but I think I found a solution to this problem as well. I found if I created a typeDef of the function pointer it worked.

-5

Try this (it works for g++ 4.5.2):

  Foo() :
      memberArray (std::array<Bar,3> {Bar(1), Bar(3), Bar(2)})
  {}
2
  • 1
    @ildjarn: That was a bit childish of you, to downvote my answer because I posted working code.
    – TonyK
    Commented Dec 28, 2011 at 0:43
  • 4
    That's a bit childish of you to assume that I'm the only one willing to downvote an incorrect answer (and you really need to learn the actual definition of "working"). Sorry to disappoint you.
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 28, 2011 at 4:11

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