233

I have a string like this:

abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5

How can I convert it into a JavaScript object like this?

{
  abc: 'foo',
  def: '[asf]',
  xyz: 5
}

30 Answers 30

344

Edit

This edit improves and explains the answer based on the comments.

var search = location.search.substring(1);
JSON.parse('{"' + decodeURI(search).replace(/"/g, '\\"').replace(/&/g, '","').replace(/=/g,'":"') + '"}')

Example

Parse abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5 in five steps:

  • decodeURI: abc=foo&def=[asf]&xyz=5
  • Escape quotes: same, as there are no quotes
  • Replace &: abc=foo","def=[asf]","xyz=5
  • Replace =: abc":"foo","def":"[asf]","xyz":"5
  • Suround with curlies and quotes: {"abc":"foo","def":"[asf]","xyz":"5"}

which is legal JSON.

An improved solution allows for more characters in the search string. It uses a reviver function for URI decoding:

var search = location.search.substring(1);
JSON.parse('{"' + search.replace(/&/g, '","').replace(/=/g,'":"') + '"}', function(key, value) { return key===""?value:decodeURIComponent(value) })

Example

search = "abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5&foo=b%3Dar";

gives

Object {abc: "foo", def: "[asf]", xyz: "5", foo: "b=ar"}

Original answer

A one-liner:

JSON.parse('{"' + decodeURI("abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5".replace(/&/g, "\",\"").replace(/=/g,"\":\"")) + '"}')
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    For this to work in CoffeeScript, escape the '=' in the regex. .replace(/\=/g,"\":\"") – airlok May 29 '12 at 15:47
  • 181
    That's no one-liner... it's a space station. – Ziggy Feb 20 '13 at 2:48
  • 5
    better if you use JSON.parse('{"' + decodeURI(location.search.substring(1).replace(/&/g, "\",\"").replace(/=/g, "\":\"")) + '"}') – Daniël Tulp Apr 3 '13 at 12:06
  • 4
    This fails if you have an equals sign character in the url to be parsed. EX: "cookie=dlksdlfj=sodkfjhsdlfj" – jholloman Aug 5 '15 at 17:28
  • 3
    Also does not work when you have one of parameters without value. – Sych Jun 23 '16 at 15:20
127

2020 ES6/7/8 and on approach

Starting ES6 and on, Javascript offers several constructs in order to create a performant solution for this issue.

This includes using URLSearchParams and iterators

let params = new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5');
params.get("abc"); // "foo"

Should your use case requires you to actually convert it to object, you can implement the following function:

function paramsToObject(entries) {
  let result = {}
  for(let entry of entries) { // each 'entry' is a [key, value] tupple
    const [key, value] = entry;
    result[key] = value;
  }
  return result;
}

Basic Demo

const urlParams = new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5');
const entries = urlParams.entries(); //returns an iterator of decoded [key,value] tuples
const params = paramsToObject(entries); //{abc:"foo",def:"[asf]",xyz:"5"}

Using Object.fromEntries and spread

We can use Object.fromEntries (which is currently in stage 4), replacing paramsToObject with Object.fromEntries(entries).

The value pairs to iterate over are the list name-value pairs with the key being the name and the value being the value.

Since URLParams, returns an iterable object, using the spread operator instead of calling .entries will also yield entries per its spec:

const urlParams = new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5');
const params = Object.fromEntries(urlParams); // {abc: "foo", def: "[asf]", xyz: "5"}

Note: All values are automatically strings as per the URLSearchParams spec

Multiple same keys

As @siipe pointed out, strings containing multiple same-key values will be coerced into the last available value: foo=first_value&foo=second_value will in essence become: {foo: "second_value"}.

As per this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/1746566/1194694 there's no spec for deciding what to do with it and each framework can behave differently.

A common use case will be to join the two same values into an array, making the output object into:

{foo: ["first_value", "second_value"]}

This can be achieved with the following code:

const groupParamsByKey = (params) => [...params.entries()].reduce((acc, tuple) => {
 // getting the key and value from each tuple
 const [key, val] = tuple;
 if(acc.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    // if the current key is already an array, we'll add the value to it
    if(Array.isArray(acc[key])) {
      acc[key] = [...acc[key], val]
    } else {
      // if it's not an array, but contains a value, we'll convert it into an array
      // and add the current value to it
      acc[key] = [acc[key], val];
    }
 } else {
  // plain assignment if no special case is present
  acc[key] = val;
 }

return acc;
}, {});

const params = new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5&def=dude');
const output = groupParamsByKey(params) // {abc: "foo", def: ["[asf]", "dude"], xyz: 5}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I do not recommend this solution. URLSearchParams has illogical specs (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/…) – Seph Reed Sep 9 '19 at 22:29
  • 1
    I'm sorry but logic doesn't have anything to do with it. One might argue that it's a search string parser - which is what it was designed to do, regardless of it being associated to a URL – silicakes Sep 10 '19 at 7:50
  • Object.fromEntries doesn't work for repeated keys. If we try to do something like ?foo=bar1&foo=bar2, we'll get only { foo: 'bar2' }. Node.js request object, for example, parses it as { foo: ['bar1', 'bar2'] } – Siipe Feb 10 at 14:24
  • You're right, however this has no spec and many languages take an opinionated approach as to how they parse it: stackoverflow.com/a/1746566/1194694 – silicakes Feb 11 at 9:54
  • This looks good to me, but to get the values for repetitive key we can use this let temp={};Object.keys(params).map(key=>{temp[key]=urlParams.getAll(key)}) – Tirumaleshwar Keregadde Mar 20 at 7:08
56
+100

ES6 one liner. Clean and simple.

Object.fromEntries(new URLSearchParams(location.search));

For your specific case, it would be:

console.log(
  Object.fromEntries(new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5'))
);

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You should use it with query string (from location.search) like "foo=bar&hello=%40world&showThing" not the entire url, as the question suggests. – chickens Sep 10 '19 at 21:07
  • 1
    This can be used, but with caution ?someValue=false becomes { someValue: "false" } – Simon Oct 23 '19 at 0:22
  • 1
    It doesn't work for repeated keys. If we try to do something like ?foo=bar1&foo=bar2, we'll get only { foo: 'bar2' }. Node.js request object parses it as { foo: ['bar1', 'bar2'] } – Siipe Feb 10 at 14:21
  • @SephReed, I believe your comment is addressed with the updated version that uses location.search – KyleMit May 14 at 2:27
  • 1
    This is more precised and useful answer. – Felix Jr Jul 2 at 23:08
27

Split on & to get name/value pairs, then split each pair on =. Here's an example:

var str = "abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xy%5Bz=5"
var obj = str.split("&").reduce(function(prev, curr, i, arr) {
    var p = curr.split("=");
    prev[decodeURIComponent(p[0])] = decodeURIComponent(p[1]);
    return prev;
}, {});

Another approach, using regular expressions:

var obj = {}; 
str.replace(/([^=&]+)=([^&]*)/g, function(m, key, value) {
    obj[decodeURIComponent(key)] = decodeURIComponent(value);
}); 

This is adapted from John Resig's "Search and Don’t Replace".

| improve this answer | |
  • tx! you should also add decodeURIComponen(p[0]) in the left :) – Alex Dec 27 '11 at 20:30
  • The first example doesn't work with an empty query string. – Michał Perłakowski Apr 4 '16 at 19:41
18

A concise solution:

location.search
  .slice(1)
  .split('&')
  .map(p => p.split('='))
  .reduce((obj, pair) => {
    const [key, value] = pair.map(decodeURIComponent);
    return ({ ...obj, [key]: value })
  }, {});
| improve this answer | |
  • this fails with arrays i.e: x=1&x=2 – Sh eldeeb May 20 at 17:30
18

The proposed solutions I found so far do not cover more complex scenarios.

I needed to convert a query string like

https://random.url.com?Target=Offer&Method=findAll&filters%5Bhas_goals_enabled%5D%5BTRUE%5D=1&filters%5Bstatus%5D=active&fields%5B%5D=id&fields%5B%5D=name&fields%5B%5D=default_goal_name

into an object like:

{
    "Target": "Offer",
    "Method": "findAll",
    "fields": [
        "id",
        "name",
        "default_goal_name"
    ],
    "filters": {
        "has_goals_enabled": {
            "TRUE": "1"
        },
        "status": "active"
    }
}

OR:

https://random.url.com?Target=Report&Method=getStats&fields%5B%5D=Offer.name&fields%5B%5D=Advertiser.company&fields%5B%5D=Stat.clicks&fields%5B%5D=Stat.conversions&fields%5B%5D=Stat.cpa&fields%5B%5D=Stat.payout&fields%5B%5D=Stat.date&fields%5B%5D=Stat.offer_id&fields%5B%5D=Affiliate.company&groups%5B%5D=Stat.offer_id&groups%5B%5D=Stat.date&filters%5BStat.affiliate_id%5D%5Bconditional%5D=EQUAL_TO&filters%5BStat.affiliate_id%5D%5Bvalues%5D=1831&limit=9999

INTO:

{
    "Target": "Report",
    "Method": "getStats",
    "fields": [
        "Offer.name",
        "Advertiser.company",
        "Stat.clicks",
        "Stat.conversions",
        "Stat.cpa",
        "Stat.payout",
        "Stat.date",
        "Stat.offer_id",
        "Affiliate.company"
    ],
    "groups": [
        "Stat.offer_id",
        "Stat.date"
    ],
    "limit": "9999",
    "filters": {
        "Stat.affiliate_id": {
            "conditional": "EQUAL_TO",
            "values": "1831"
        }
    }
}

I compiled and adapted multiple solutions into one that actually works:

CODE:

var getParamsAsObject = function (query) {

    query = query.substring(query.indexOf('?') + 1);

    var re = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g;
    var decodeRE = /\+/g;

    var decode = function (str) {
        return decodeURIComponent(str.replace(decodeRE, " "));
    };

    var params = {}, e;
    while (e = re.exec(query)) {
        var k = decode(e[1]), v = decode(e[2]);
        if (k.substring(k.length - 2) === '[]') {
            k = k.substring(0, k.length - 2);
            (params[k] || (params[k] = [])).push(v);
        }
        else params[k] = v;
    }

    var assign = function (obj, keyPath, value) {
        var lastKeyIndex = keyPath.length - 1;
        for (var i = 0; i < lastKeyIndex; ++i) {
            var key = keyPath[i];
            if (!(key in obj))
                obj[key] = {}
            obj = obj[key];
        }
        obj[keyPath[lastKeyIndex]] = value;
    }

    for (var prop in params) {
        var structure = prop.split('[');
        if (structure.length > 1) {
            var levels = [];
            structure.forEach(function (item, i) {
                var key = item.replace(/[?[\]\\ ]/g, '');
                levels.push(key);
            });
            assign(params, levels, params[prop]);
            delete(params[prop]);
        }
    }
    return params;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • This is the best answer, as it is indeed properly handles complex queries. – Georgy Ivanov Apr 24 '18 at 21:01
  • I think this just complicates things, I'd just pass obj=encodeURIComponent(JSON.stringify({what:{ever:','},i:['like']})). – chickens Jan 2 at 21:16
  • Now this is what I'm talking about. The most complete answer I could find here! – codemonkey Jul 11 at 21:18
15

This is the simple version, obviously you'll want to add some error checking:

var obj = {};
var pairs = queryString.split('&');
for(i in pairs){
    var split = pairs[i].split('=');
    obj[decodeURIComponent(split[0])] = decodeURIComponent(split[1]);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Didn't you forget to unencode the string to convert the %5B and %5D to characters? – jfriend00 Dec 27 '11 at 20:29
  • @Alex - Did you use the updated code or the original? Original had one issue and a typo. – Justin Niessner Dec 27 '11 at 20:34
  • It can't handle params properly when their values contain '='. It trims the values to first '='. – Greck Oct 27 '13 at 21:54
  • JSON.parse('{"' + decodeURIComponent(query.replace(/"/g, '\\"').replace(/&/g, '","').replace(/=/g,'":"') + '"}')); works for me – Danil Gaponov May 11 '16 at 13:42
  • 1
    its doesnt work for name[]=test1&name[]=test2 and it will result in name[]=test2 – Rafee Jun 27 '16 at 3:11
10

I found $.String.deparam the most complete pre built solution (can do nested objects etc.). Check out the documentation.

| improve this answer | |
  • just pointing out if your input is always going to be a serialized query string there is no need to worry about nesting and a more lightweight solution is probably better – mattacular Dec 27 '11 at 20:35
  • Well of course... but it's been done and tested already (Justin e.g. forget to URI decode in the initial answer - which are small issues that can make things a lot more complex than they initially seem). – Daff Dec 27 '11 at 21:46
9

2019 One-Liner Approach

For your specific case:

Object.fromEntries(new URLSearchParams('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5'));

For the more generic case where someone wants to parse query params to an object:

Object.fromEntries(new URLSearchParams(location.search));

If you're unable to use Object.fromEntries, this will also work:

Array.from(new URLSearchParams(window.location.search)).reduce((o, i) => ({ ...o, [i[0]]: i[1] }), {});
| improve this answer | |
  • Also [...new URLSearchParams(window.location.search)].reduce((o, i) => ({ ...o, [i[0]]: i[1] }), {}); – dman Aug 21 '19 at 18:52
7

Another solution based on the latest standard of URLSearchParams (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/URLSearchParams)

function getQueryParamsObject() {
  const searchParams = new URLSearchParams(location.search.slice(1));
  return searchParams
    ? _.fromPairs(Array.from(searchParams.entries()))
    : {};
}

Please note that this solution is making use of

Array.from (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/from)

and _.fromPairs (https://lodash.com/docs#fromPairs) of lodash for the sake of simplicity.

It should be easy to create a more compatible solution since you have access to searchParams.entries() iterator.

| improve this answer | |
6

I had the same problem, tried the solutions here, but none of them really worked, since I had arrays in the URL parameters, like this:

?param[]=5&param[]=8&othr_param=abc&param[]=string

So I ended up writing my own JS function, which makes an array out of the param in URI:

/**
 * Creates an object from URL encoded data
 */
var createObjFromURI = function() {
    var uri = decodeURI(location.search.substr(1));
    var chunks = uri.split('&');
    var params = Object();

    for (var i=0; i < chunks.length ; i++) {
        var chunk = chunks[i].split('=');
        if(chunk[0].search("\\[\\]") !== -1) {
            if( typeof params[chunk[0]] === 'undefined' ) {
                params[chunk[0]] = [chunk[1]];

            } else {
                params[chunk[0]].push(chunk[1]);
            }


        } else {
            params[chunk[0]] = chunk[1];
        }
    }

    return params;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This was really helpful and did almost exactly what I wanted. I didn't like, though, how the "[]" is kept in tact in the object if the URL parameters are like: bacon[]=eggs&bacon[]=toast. So I added in a line after if(chunk[0].search("\\[\\]") !== -1) { that is chunk[0]=chunk[0].replace(/\[\]$/,''); – rgbflawed Aug 12 '13 at 19:00
  • @rgbflawed you should edit the answer for the sake of future reader and legibility – Webwoman Feb 22 '19 at 22:09
  • Use const instead of var because someone might do createObjFromURI = 'some text' and then they would mess up the code. if you use const then someone running createObjFromURI = 'some text' will make an error cannot assign value to constant variable. – Justin Liu May 14 at 16:29
5

Using ES6, URL API and URLSearchParams API.

function objectifyQueryString(url) {
  let _url = new URL(url);
  let _params = new URLSearchParams(_url.search);
  let query = Array.from(_params.keys()).reduce((sum, value)=>{
    return Object.assign({[value]: _params.get(value)}, sum);
  }, {});
  return query;
}
| improve this answer | |
5

ES6 one liner (if we can call it that way seeing the long line)

[...new URLSearchParams(location.search).entries()].reduce((prev, [key,val]) => {prev[key] = val; return prev}, {})

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You can also destructure the cur for some added clarity. .reduce((prev, [key, val]) => {prev[key] = val}) – Allan Lei Nov 2 '18 at 4:13
  • i like your suggestion Allan Lei. I update my answer – fadomire Nov 2 '18 at 9:14
4

For Node JS, you can use the Node JS API querystring:

const querystring = require('querystring');

querystring.parse('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5&foo=b%3Dar');
// returns the object

Documentation: https://nodejs.org/api/querystring.html

| improve this answer | |
3

Pretty easy using the URLSearchParams JavaScript Web API,

var paramsString = "q=forum&topic=api";

//returns an iterator object
var searchParams = new URLSearchParams(paramsString);

//Usage
for (let p of searchParams) {
  console.log(p);
}

//Get the query strings
console.log(searchParams.toString());

//You can also pass in objects

var paramsObject = {q:"forum",topic:"api"}

//returns an iterator object
var searchParams = new URLSearchParams(paramsObject);

//Usage
for (let p of searchParams) {
  console.log(p);
}

//Get the query strings
console.log(searchParams.toString());

Useful Links

NOTE: Not Supported in IE

| improve this answer | |
2

There is no native solution that I'm aware of. Dojo has a built-in unserialization method if you use that framework by chance.

Otherwise you can implement it yourself rather simply:

function unserialize(str) {
  str = decodeURIComponent(str);
  var chunks = str.split('&'),
      obj = {};
  for(var c=0; c < chunks.length; c++) {
    var split = chunks[c].split('=', 2);
    obj[split[0]] = split[1];
  }
  return obj;
}

edit: added decodeURIComponent()

| improve this answer | |
2

There's a lightweight library called YouAreI.js that's tested and makes this really easy.

YouAreI = require('YouAreI')
uri = new YouAreI('http://user:pass@www.example.com:3000/a/b/c?d=dad&e=1&f=12.3#fragment');

uri.query_get() => { d: 'dad', e: '1', f: '12.3' }
| improve this answer | |
2

One of the simplest way to do this using URLSearchParam interface.

Below is the working code snippet:

let paramObj={},
    querystring=window.location.search,
    searchParams = new URLSearchParams(querystring);    

  //*** :loop to add key and values to the param object.
 searchParams.forEach(function(value, key) {
      paramObj[key] = value;
   });
| improve this answer | |
1

This seems to be the best solution as it takes multiple parameters of the same name into consideration.

    function paramsToJSON(str) {
        var pairs = str.split('&');
        var result = {};
        pairs.forEach(function(pair) {
            pair = pair.split('=');
            var name = pair[0]
            var value = pair[1]
            if( name.length )
                if (result[name] !== undefined) {
                    if (!result[name].push) {
                        result[name] = [result[name]];
                    }
                    result[name].push(value || '');
                } else {
                    result[name] = value || '';
                }
        });
        return( result );
    }

<a href="index.html?x=1&x=2&x=3&y=blah">something</a>
paramsToJSON("x=1&x=2&x=3&y=blah"); 

console yields => {x: Array[3], y: "blah"} where x is an array as is proper JSON

I later decided to convert it to a jQuery plugin too...

$.fn.serializeURLParams = function() {
    var result = {};

    if( !this.is("a") || this.attr("href").indexOf("?") == -1 ) 
        return( result );

    var pairs = this.attr("href").split("?")[1].split('&');
    pairs.forEach(function(pair) {
        pair = pair.split('=');
        var name = decodeURI(pair[0])
        var value = decodeURI(pair[1])
        if( name.length )
            if (result[name] !== undefined) {
                if (!result[name].push) {
                    result[name] = [result[name]];
                }
                result[name].push(value || '');
            } else {
                result[name] = value || '';
            }
    });
    return( result )
}

<a href="index.html?x=1&x=2&x=3&y=blah">something</a>
$("a").serializeURLParams(); 

console yields => {x: Array[3], y: "blah"} where x is an array as is proper JSON

Now, the first will accept the parameters only but the jQuery plugin will take the whole url and return the serialized parameters.

| improve this answer | |
1

Here's one I use:

var params = {};
window.location.search.substring(1).split('&').forEach(function(pair) {
  pair = pair.split('=');
  if (pair[1] !== undefined) {
    var key = decodeURIComponent(pair[0]),
        val = decodeURIComponent(pair[1]),
        val = val ? val.replace(/\++/g,' ').trim() : '';

    if (key.length === 0) {
      return;
    }
    if (params[key] === undefined) {
      params[key] = val;
    }
    else {
      if ("function" !== typeof params[key].push) {
        params[key] = [params[key]];
      }
      params[key].push(val);
    }
  }
});
console.log(params);

Basic usage, eg.
?a=aa&b=bb
Object {a: "aa", b: "bb"}

Duplicate params, eg.
?a=aa&b=bb&c=cc&c=potato
Object {a: "aa", b: "bb", c: ["cc","potato"]}

Missing keys, eg.
?a=aa&b=bb&=cc
Object {a: "aa", b: "bb"}

Missing values, eg.
?a=aa&b=bb&c
Object {a: "aa", b: "bb"}

The above JSON/regex solutions throw a syntax error on this wacky url:
?a=aa&b=bb&c=&=dd&e
Object {a: "aa", b: "bb", c: ""}

| improve this answer | |
1

Here's my quick and dirty version, basically its splitting up the URL parameters separated by '&' into array elements, and then iterates over that array adding key/value pairs separated by '=' into an object. I'm using decodeURIComponent() to translate the encoded characters to their normal string equivalents (so %20 becomes a space, %26 becomes '&', etc):

function deparam(paramStr) {
    let paramArr = paramStr.split('&');     
    let paramObj = {};
    paramArr.forEach(e=>{
        let param = e.split('=');
        paramObj[param[0]] = decodeURIComponent(param[1]);
    });
    return paramObj;
}

example:

deparam('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5')

returns

{
    abc: "foo"
    def:"[asf]"
    xyz :"5"
}

The only issue is that xyz is a string and not a number (due to using decodeURIComponent()), but beyond that its not a bad starting point.

| improve this answer | |
1
//under ES6 
const getUrlParamAsObject = (url = window.location.href) => {
    let searchParams = url.split('?')[1];
    const result = {};
    //in case the queryString is empty
    if (searchParams!==undefined) {
        const paramParts = searchParams.split('&');
        for(let part of paramParts) {
            let paramValuePair = part.split('=');
            //exclude the case when the param has no value
            if(paramValuePair.length===2) {
                result[paramValuePair[0]] = decodeURIComponent(paramValuePair[1]);
            }
        }

    }
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I really like this method (in 2017) compared to some of the other regex-based answers. If polyfill the arrow function (or rewrite as a traditional function), I think this should work pretty well cross-browser – Scribblemacher Sep 18 '17 at 14:06
  • @Scribblemacher with Babel's help you can do it well under other environment – XYz Amos Sep 19 '17 at 2:16
1

Using phpjs

function parse_str(str, array) {
  //       discuss at: http://phpjs.org/functions/parse_str/
  //      original by: Cagri Ekin
  //      improved by: Michael White (http://getsprink.com)
  //      improved by: Jack
  //      improved by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
  //      bugfixed by: Onno Marsman
  //      bugfixed by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
  //      bugfixed by: stag019
  //      bugfixed by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
  //      bugfixed by: MIO_KODUKI (http://mio-koduki.blogspot.com/)
  // reimplemented by: stag019
  //         input by: Dreamer
  //         input by: Zaide (http://zaidesthings.com/)
  //         input by: David Pesta (http://davidpesta.com/)
  //         input by: jeicquest
  //             note: When no argument is specified, will put variables in global scope.
  //             note: When a particular argument has been passed, and the returned value is different parse_str of PHP. For example, a=b=c&d====c
  //             test: skip
  //        example 1: var arr = {};
  //        example 1: parse_str('first=foo&second=bar', arr);
  //        example 1: $result = arr
  //        returns 1: { first: 'foo', second: 'bar' }
  //        example 2: var arr = {};
  //        example 2: parse_str('str_a=Jack+and+Jill+didn%27t+see+the+well.', arr);
  //        example 2: $result = arr
  //        returns 2: { str_a: "Jack and Jill didn't see the well." }
  //        example 3: var abc = {3:'a'};
  //        example 3: parse_str('abc[a][b]["c"]=def&abc[q]=t+5');
  //        returns 3: {"3":"a","a":{"b":{"c":"def"}},"q":"t 5"}

  var strArr = String(str)
    .replace(/^&/, '')
    .replace(/&$/, '')
    .split('&'),
    sal = strArr.length,
    i, j, ct, p, lastObj, obj, lastIter, undef, chr, tmp, key, value,
    postLeftBracketPos, keys, keysLen,
    fixStr = function(str) {
      return decodeURIComponent(str.replace(/\+/g, '%20'));
    };

  if (!array) {
    array = this.window;
  }

  for (i = 0; i < sal; i++) {
    tmp = strArr[i].split('=');
    key = fixStr(tmp[0]);
    value = (tmp.length < 2) ? '' : fixStr(tmp[1]);

    while (key.charAt(0) === ' ') {
      key = key.slice(1);
    }
    if (key.indexOf('\x00') > -1) {
      key = key.slice(0, key.indexOf('\x00'));
    }
    if (key && key.charAt(0) !== '[') {
      keys = [];
      postLeftBracketPos = 0;
      for (j = 0; j < key.length; j++) {
        if (key.charAt(j) === '[' && !postLeftBracketPos) {
          postLeftBracketPos = j + 1;
        } else if (key.charAt(j) === ']') {
          if (postLeftBracketPos) {
            if (!keys.length) {
              keys.push(key.slice(0, postLeftBracketPos - 1));
            }
            keys.push(key.substr(postLeftBracketPos, j - postLeftBracketPos));
            postLeftBracketPos = 0;
            if (key.charAt(j + 1) !== '[') {
              break;
            }
          }
        }
      }
      if (!keys.length) {
        keys = [key];
      }
      for (j = 0; j < keys[0].length; j++) {
        chr = keys[0].charAt(j);
        if (chr === ' ' || chr === '.' || chr === '[') {
          keys[0] = keys[0].substr(0, j) + '_' + keys[0].substr(j + 1);
        }
        if (chr === '[') {
          break;
        }
      }

      obj = array;
      for (j = 0, keysLen = keys.length; j < keysLen; j++) {
        key = keys[j].replace(/^['"]/, '')
          .replace(/['"]$/, '');
        lastIter = j !== keys.length - 1;
        lastObj = obj;
        if ((key !== '' && key !== ' ') || j === 0) {
          if (obj[key] === undef) {
            obj[key] = {};
          }
          obj = obj[key];
        } else { // To insert new dimension
          ct = -1;
          for (p in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
              if (+p > ct && p.match(/^\d+$/g)) {
                ct = +p;
              }
            }
          }
          key = ct + 1;
        }
      }
      lastObj[key] = value;
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Building on top of Mike Causer's answer I've made this function which takes into consideration multiple params with the same key (foo=bar&foo=baz) and also comma-separated parameters (foo=bar,baz,bin). It also lets you search for a certain query key.

function getQueryParams(queryKey) {
    var queryString = window.location.search;
    var query = {};
    var pairs = (queryString[0] === '?' ? queryString.substr(1) : queryString).split('&');
    for (var i = 0; i < pairs.length; i++) {
        var pair = pairs[i].split('=');
        var key = decodeURIComponent(pair[0]);
        var value = decodeURIComponent(pair[1] || '');
        // Se possui uma vírgula no valor, converter em um array
        value = (value.indexOf(',') === -1 ? value : value.split(','));

        // Se a key já existe, tratar ela como um array
        if (query[key]) {
            if (query[key].constructor === Array) {
                // Array.concat() faz merge se o valor inserido for um array
                query[key] = query[key].concat(value);
            } else {
                // Se não for um array, criar um array contendo o valor anterior e o novo valor
                query[key] = [query[key], value];
            }
        } else {
            query[key] = value;
        }
    }

    if (typeof queryKey === 'undefined') {
        return query;
    } else {
        return query[queryKey];
    }
}

Example input: foo.html?foo=bar&foo=baz&foo=bez,boz,buz&bar=1,2,3

Example output

{
    foo: ["bar","baz","bez","boz","buz"],
    bar: ["1","2","3"]
}
| improve this answer | |
1

If you are using URI.js, you can use:

https://medialize.github.io/URI.js/docs.html#static-parseQuery

var result = URI.parseQuery("?foo=bar&hello=world&hello=mars&bam=&yup");
result === {
  foo: "bar",
  hello: ["world", "mars"],
  bam: "",
  yup: null
};
| improve this answer | |
1

console.log(decodeURI('abc=foo&def=%5Basf%5D&xyz=5')
  .split('&')
  .reduce((result, current) => {
    const [key, value] = current.split('=');

    result[key] = value;

    return result
  }, {}))

| improve this answer | |
0

FIRST U NEED TO DEFINE WHAT'S A GET VAR:

function getVar()
{
    this.length = 0;
    this.keys = [];
    this.push = function(key, value)
    {
        if(key=="") key = this.length++;
        this[key] = value;
        this.keys.push(key);
        return this[key];
    }
}

Than just read:

function urlElement()
{
    var thisPrototype = window.location;
    for(var prototypeI in thisPrototype) this[prototypeI] = thisPrototype[prototypeI];
    this.Variables = new getVar();
    if(!this.search) return this;
    var variables = this.search.replace(/\?/g,'').split('&');
    for(var varI=0; varI<variables.length; varI++)
    {
        var nameval = variables[varI].split('=');
        var name = nameval[0].replace(/\]/g,'').split('[');
        var pVariable = this.Variables;
        for(var nameI=0;nameI<name.length;nameI++)
        {
            if(name.length-1==nameI) pVariable.push(name[nameI],nameval[1]);
            else var pVariable = (typeof pVariable[name[nameI]] != 'object')? pVariable.push(name[nameI],new getVar()) : pVariable[name[nameI]];
        }
    }
}

and use like:

var mlocation = new urlElement();
mlocation = mlocation.Variables;
for(var key=0;key<mlocation.keys.length;key++)
{
    console.log(key);
    console.log(mlocation[mlocation.keys[key]];
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I needed to also deal with + in the query part of the URL (decodeURIComponent doesn't), so I adapted Wolfgang's code to become:

var search = location.search.substring(1);
search = search?JSON.parse('{"' + search.replace(/\+/g, ' ').replace(/&/g, '","').replace(/=/g,'":"') + '"}',
             function(key, value) { return key===""?value:decodeURIComponent(value)}):{};

In my case, I'm using jQuery to get URL-ready form parameters, then this trick to build an object out of it and I can then easily update parameters on the object and rebuild the query URL, e.g.:

var objForm = JSON.parse('{"' + $myForm.serialize().replace(/\+/g, ' ').replace(/&/g, '","').replace(/=/g,'":"') + '"}',
             function(key, value) { return key===""?value:decodeURIComponent(value)});
objForm.anyParam += stringToAddToTheParam;
var serializedForm = $.param(objForm);
| improve this answer | |
0

I do it in this way:

const uri = new URL('https://example.org/?myvar1=longValue&myvar2=value')
const result = {}
for (let p of uri.searchParams) {
  result[p[0]] = p[1]
}
| improve this answer | |
0

If you need recursion, you can use the tiny js-extension-ling library.

npm i js-extension-ling
const jsx = require("js-extension-ling");

console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a=1")); 
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a=1&a=3")); 
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a[]=1")); 
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a[]=1&a[]=pomme")); 
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a[0]=one&a[1]=five"));
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("http://blabla?foo=bar&number=1234")); 
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a[fruits][red][]=strawberry"));
console.log(jsx.queryStringToObject("a[fruits][red][]=strawberry&a[1]=five&a[fruits][red][]=cherry&a[fruits][yellow][]=lemon&a[fruits][yellow][688]=banana"));

This will output something like this:

{ a: '1' }
{ a: '3' }
{ a: { '0': '1' } }
{ a: { '0': '1', '1': 'pomme' } }
{ a: { '0': 'one', '1': 'five' } }
{ foo: 'bar', number: '1234' }
{
  a: { fruits: { red: { '0': 'strawberry' } } }
}
{
  a: {
    '1': 'five',
    fruits: {
      red: { '0': 'strawberry', '1': 'cherry' },
      yellow: { '0': 'lemon', '688': 'banana' }
    }
  }
}

Note: it's based on locutus parse_str function (https://locutus.io/php/strings/parse_str/).

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.