119

This question already has an answer here:

I am trying hard to compare two floating point numbers within a bash script. I have to variables, e.g.

let num1=3.17648e-22
let num2=1.5

Now, I just want do a simple comparison of these two numbers:

st=`echo "$num1 < $num2" | bc`
if [ $st -eq 1]; then
  echo -e "$num1 < $num2"
else
  echo -e "$num1 >= $num2"
fi

Unfortunately, I have some problems with the right treatment of the num1 which can be of the "e-format". :(

Any help, hints are welcome!

marked as duplicate by codeforester bash Jul 23 at 1:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

17 Answers 17

127

More conveniently

This can be done more conveniently using Bash's numeric context:

if (( $(echo "$num1 > $num2" |bc -l) )); then
  …
fi

Explanation

Piping through the basic calculator command bc returns either 1 or 0.

The option -l is equivalent to --mathlib; it loads the standard math library.

Enclosing the whole expression between double parenthesis (( )) will translate these values to respectively true or false.

Please, ensure that the bc basic calculator package is installed.

This equally works for floats in scientific format, provided a capital letter E is employed, e.g. num1=3.44E6

  • Same issue as stackoverflow.com/questions/8654051/… e.g. $ echo "1.1+2e+02" | bc (standard_in) 1: syntax error – Nemo Feb 2 '16 at 10:55
  • 2
    Getting command not found error. What am i missing – Mohit Arora May 29 '16 at 13:19
  • 1
    @MohitArora Please, ensure that you have the bc calculator package installed. – Serge Stroobandt Mar 28 '17 at 18:52
  • 1
    I get a 0: not found with the statement if (( $(echo "$TOP_PROCESS_PERCENTAGE > $THRESHOLD" | bc -l) )); then. – Stephane Aug 4 '17 at 13:14
  • 1
    To all those who get "command not found", remember you need to enclose the bc into either backticks or $() and then into (( )) ... i.e. (( $(bc -l<<<"$a>$b") )) and not (( bc -l<<<"$a>$b" )). – Normadize Apr 13 '18 at 1:13
96

bash handles only integer maths but you can use bc command as follows:

$ num1=3.17648E-22
$ num2=1.5
$ echo $num1'>'$num2 | bc -l
0
$ echo $num2'>'$num1 | bc -l
1

Note that exponent sign must be uppercase

  • 1
    that is what he is trying to do already? – Daniel Persson Dec 28 '11 at 10:00
  • 3
    yes, but to workaround incorrect calculations its needed to uppercase 'e' sign in scientific number notation and use -l flag to bc programm for predefined math routines – alrusdi Dec 28 '11 at 10:24
  • 2
    you should point that out in your answer then, instead of just posting a very similar solution and not mention the important differances. – Daniel Persson Dec 28 '11 at 10:34
  • 4
    It is not a very similar solution. Alrusdi's solution uses the bc tool and that is what I would recommend to any BASH programmer. BASH is typeless language. Yeah, it can do integer arithmetic, but for floating point you must use some external tool. BC is the best because that is what it is made for. – DejanLekic Dec 28 '11 at 14:42
  • 6
    Since he is trying to use it in an if statement, I would show that. if [ $(... | bc -l) == 1 ] ; then ... – Robert Jacobs Mar 3 '15 at 22:12
23

It's better to use awk for non integer mathematics. You can use this bash utility function:

numCompare() {
   awk -v n1="$1" -v n2="$2" 'BEGIN {printf "%s " (n1<n2?"<":">=") " %s\n", n1, n2}'
}

And call it as:

numCompare 5.65 3.14e-22
5.65 >= 3.14e-22

numCompare 5.65e-23 3.14e-22
5.65e-23 < 3.14e-22

numCompare 3.145678 3.145679
3.145678 < 3.145679
  • 2
    i like this answer, people tend to shy away from awk esp beginners, they seem to think it is harder than it actually is, i think people get intimidated by the curly braces and the seemingly language mixed syntax (at a glance). And since awk is pretty much guaranteed to be present on the target system as well, just like bc (not sure which one, if any, is ever NOT installed). I love bash scripting but that no floating point, not even a meager 2 decimal places (i guess someone could write a 'fake' wrapper for that), really is annoying... – osirisgothra Nov 6 '13 at 11:03
  • Agreed, awk provides pretty much everything that pure shells could not do. – anubhava Nov 6 '13 at 11:30
  • 2
    Using awk and bc in shell scripts is a standard practice since ancient time, I would say some features have never been added to shells because they are available in awk, bc and other Unix tools. No need for purity in shell scripts. – piokuc Sep 15 '14 at 10:06
  • 1
    @WanderingMind One way to do that would be to pass the 0 or 1 to exit so that Awk communicates the result back to the shell in a proper, machine-readable way. if awk -v n1="123.456" -v n2="3.14159e17" 'BEGIN { exit (n1 <= n2) }' /dev/null; then echo bigger; else echo not; fi ... though note how the condition is inverted (the exit status 0 means success to the shell). – tripleee Aug 12 '16 at 5:13
  • 1
    This awk solution is more robust in my case than the one with bc that returns wrong results for a reason I didn't get. – MBR Oct 16 '18 at 9:51
20

Pure bash solution for comparing floats without exponential notation, leading or trailing zeros:

if [ ${FOO%.*} -eq ${BAR%.*} ] && [ ${FOO#*.} \> ${BAR#*.} ] || [ ${FOO%.*} -gt ${BAR%.*} ]; then
  echo "${FOO} > ${BAR}";
else
  echo "${FOO} <= ${BAR}";
fi

Order of logical operators matters. Integer parts are compared as numbers and fractional parts are intentionally compared as strings. Variables are split into integer and fractional parts using this method.

Won't compare floats with integers (without dot).

11

you can use awk combined with a bash if condition, awk will print 1 or 0 and those will be interpreted by if clause with true or false.

if (( $(awk 'BEGIN {print ("'$d1'" >= "'$d2'")}') )); then
    echo "yes"
else 
    echo "no"
fi
  • 1
    If d1 is 10.0 and d2 is 2.0 it returns no and if d1 is 5.0 it's yes. So this answer is wrong. – mgutt Jul 30 at 13:59
5

beware when comparing numbers that are package versions, like checking if grep 2.20 is greater than version 2.6:

$ awk 'BEGIN { print (2.20 >= 2.6) ? "YES" : "NO" }'
NO

$ awk 'BEGIN { print (2.2 >= 2.6) ? "YES" : "NO" }'
NO

$ awk 'BEGIN { print (2.60 == 2.6) ? "YES" : "NO" }'
YES

I solved such problem with such shell/awk function:

# get version of GNU tool
toolversion() {
    local prog="$1" operator="$2" value="$3" version

    version=$($prog --version | awk '{print $NF; exit}')

    awk -vv1="$version" -vv2="$value" 'BEGIN {
        split(v1, a, /\./); split(v2, b, /\./);
        if (a[1] == b[1]) {
            exit (a[2] '$operator' b[2]) ? 0 : 1
        }
        else {
            exit (a[1] '$operator' b[1]) ? 0 : 1
        }
    }'
}

if toolversion grep '>=' 2.6; then
   # do something awesome
fi
  • On a Debian-based system, dpkg --compare-versions is often useful. It has the full logic for comparing Debian package versions built into it, which are more complex than just x.y. – Neil Mayhew Dec 14 '17 at 21:10
3

I used the answers from here and put them in a function, you can use it like this:

is_first_floating_number_bigger 1.5 1.2
result="${__FUNCTION_RETURN}"

Once called, echo $result will be 1 in this case, otherwise 0.

The function:

is_first_floating_number_bigger () {
    number1="$1"
    number2="$2"

    [ ${number1%.*} -eq ${number2%.*} ] && [ ${number1#*.} \> ${number2#*.} ] || [ ${number1%.*} -gt ${number2%.*} ];
    result=$?
    if [ "$result" -eq 0 ]; then result=1; else result=0; fi

    __FUNCTION_RETURN="${result}"
}

Or a version with debug output:

is_first_floating_number_bigger () {
    number1="$1"
    number2="$2"

    echo "... is_first_floating_number_bigger: comparing ${number1} with ${number2} (to check if the first one is bigger)"

    [ ${number1%.*} -eq ${number2%.*} ] && [ ${number1#*.} \> ${number2#*.} ] || [ ${number1%.*} -gt ${number2%.*} ];
    result=$?
    if [ "$result" -eq 0 ]; then result=1; else result=0; fi

    echo "... is_first_floating_number_bigger: result is: ${result}"

    if [ "$result" -eq 0 ]; then
        echo "... is_first_floating_number_bigger: ${number1} is not bigger than ${number2}"
    else
        echo "... is_first_floating_number_bigger: ${number1} is bigger than ${number2}"
    fi

    __FUNCTION_RETURN="${result}"
}

Just save the function in a separated .sh file and include it like this:

. /path/to/the/new-file.sh
3

Of course, if you don't need really floating-point arithmetic, just arithmetic on e.g. dollar values where there are always exactly two decimal digits, you might just drop the dot (effectively multiplying by 100) and compare the resulting integers.

if [[ $((10#${num1/.})) < $((10#${num2/.})) ]]; then
    ...

This obviously requires you to be sure that both values have the same number of decimal places.

2

This script may help where I'm checking if installed grails version is greater than minimum required. Hope it helps.

#!/bin/bash                                                                                         

min=1.4                                                                                             
current=`echo $(grails --version | head -n 2 | awk '{print $NF}' | cut -c 1-3)`                         

if [ 1 -eq `echo "${current} < ${min}" | bc` ]                                                          
then                                                                                                
    echo "yo, you have older version of grails."                                                   
else                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
    echo "Hurray, you have the latest version" 
fi
1

Use korn shell, in bash you may have to compare the decimal part separately

#!/bin/ksh
X=0.2
Y=0.2
echo $X
echo $Y

if [[ $X -lt $Y ]]
then
     echo "X is less than Y"
elif [[ $X -gt $Y ]]
then
     echo "X is greater than Y"
elif [[ $X -eq $Y ]]
then
     echo "X is equal to Y"
fi
  • 2
    the problem is that many distributions do not come with ksh installed, and if your script is going to be used by others, they tend to not like having to install extra stuff, especially when its just a script that is supposed to be written in bash -one would think they didnt need ANOTHER shell to do that, which undermines the whole reason of using a bash script in the first place --sure we could ALSO go code it in C++, but why? – osirisgothra Nov 6 '13 at 10:56
  • What are the distributions which come without ksh installed? – piokuc Sep 15 '14 at 10:01
  • 1
    @piokuc for example, Ubuntu Desktop & Server. I would say it's pretty major one... – Olli Dec 21 '14 at 11:57
  • Also, question specifically asks for solution that works in bash. There might be really good reasons for that. Say, it's part of large application and migrating everything to ksh is not feasible. Or it's running on embedded platform where installing another shell is really a problem. – Olli Dec 21 '14 at 12:00
1

Using bashj (https://sourceforge.net/projects/bashj/ ), a bash mutant with java support, you just write (and it IS easy to read):

#!/usr/bin/bashj

#!java
static int doubleCompare(double a,double b) {return((a>b) ? 1 : (a<b) ? -1 : 0);}

#!bashj
num1=3.17648e-22
num2=1.5
comp=j.doubleCompare($num1,$num2)
if [ $comp == 0 ] ; then echo "Equal" ; fi
if [ $comp == 1 ] ; then echo "$num1 > $num2" ; fi
if [ $comp == -1 ] ; then echo "$num2 > $num1" ; fi

Of course bashj bash/java hybridation offers much more...

1

please check the below edited code:-

#!/bin/bash

export num1=(3.17648*e-22)
export num2=1.5

st=$((`echo "$num1 < $num2"| bc`))
if [ $st -eq 1 ]
  then
    echo -e "$num1 < $num2"
  else
    echo -e "$num1 >= $num2"
fi

this works well.

0

How about this? =D

VAL_TO_CHECK="1.00001"
if [ $(awk '{printf($1 >= $2) ? 1 : 0}' <<<" $VAL_TO_CHECK 1 ") -eq 1 ] ; then
    echo "$VAL_TO_CHECK >= 1"
else
    echo "$VAL_TO_CHECK < 1"
fi
  • 1
    The Awk script should simply exit 0 to report truth and exit 1 to return false; then you can simplify to the remarkably elegant if awk 'BEGIN { exit (ARGV[1] >= ARGV[2]) ? 0 : 1 }' "$VAL_TO_CHECK" 1; then... (more elegant still if you encapsulate the Awk script in a shell function). – tripleee Dec 8 '17 at 10:45
0
num1=0.555
num2=2.555


if [ `echo "$num1>$num2"|bc` -eq 1 ]; then
       echo "$num1 is greater then $num2"
else
       echo "$num2 is greater then $num1"
fi
0

A solution supporting the scientific notation with both uppercase and lowercase exponents (e.g., 12.00e4):

if (( $(bc -l <<< "${value1/e/E} < ${value2/e/E}") ))
then
    echo "$value1 is less than $value2"
fi 
0

I was posting this as an answer to https://stackoverflow.com/a/56415379/1745001 when it got closed as a dup of this question so here it is as it applies here too:

For simplicity and clarity just use awk for the calculations as it's a standard UNIX tool and so just as likely to be present as bc and much easier to work with syntactically.

For this question:

$ cat tst.sh
#!/bin/bash

num1=3.17648e-22
num2=1.5

awk -v num1="$num1" -v num2="$num2" '
BEGIN {
    print "num1", (num1 < num2 ? "<" : ">="), "num2"
}
'

$ ./tst.sh
num1 < num2

and for that other question that was closed as a dup of this one:

$ cat tst.sh
#!/bin/bash

read -p "Operator: " operator
read -p "First number: " ch1
read -p "Second number: " ch2

awk -v ch1="$ch1" -v ch2="$ch2" -v op="$operator" '
BEGIN {
    if ( ( op == "/" ) && ( ch2 == 0 ) ) {
        print "Nope..."
    }
    else {
        print ch1 '"$operator"' ch2
    }
}
'

$ ./tst.sh
Operator: /
First number: 4.5
Second number: 2
2.25

$ ./tst.sh
Operator: /
First number: 4.5
Second number: 0
Nope...
  • essentialy its an awk trick or a bc trick. – Dudi Boy Jun 2 at 16:10
  • @DudiBoy no, it's clear, simple, portable awk code or non-obvious, obscure, shell-dependent shell + bc code. – Ed Morton Jun 2 at 16:53
0

awk and tools like it (I'm staring at you sed...) should be relegated to the dustbin of old projects, with code that everyone is too afraid to touch since it was written in a read-never language.

Or you're the relatively rare project that needs to prioritize CPU usage optimization over code maintenance optimization... in which case, carry on.

If not, though, why not instead just use something readable and explicit, such as python? Your fellow coders and future self will thank you. You can use python inline with bash just like all the others.

num1=3.17648E-22
num2=1.5
if python -c "exit(0 if $num1 < $num2 else 1)"; then
    echo "yes, $num1 < $num2"
else
    echo "no, $num1 >= $num2"
fi
  • Why is this being downvoted? – Witiko Oct 14 '17 at 19:17
  • @Witiko My original version was a bit snarkier. – CivFan Oct 16 '17 at 15:39
  • 1
    If you're relegating awk and sed (I'm looking at you CivFan) to the dustbin of history, you're a lousy systems administrator and you're typing too much code. (And I like and use Python, so it's not about that). -1 for misplaced snarkiness. There's a place in the systems domain for those tools, Python or no. – Mike S Dec 14 '17 at 21:42
  • 1
    Interestingly, I ended up with good ol' Perl! awk '${print $5}' ptpd_log_file | perl -ne '$_ > 0.000100 && print' > /tmp/outfile. Easy peasy. Every language has its place. – Mike S Dec 14 '17 at 22:22
  • 1
    Don't lump awk in with seds syntacic wackiness. Unlike python, awk is a mandatory utility on every UNIX installation and the awk equivalent of python -c "import sys; sys.exit(0 if float($num1) < float($num2) else 1)" is simply awk "BEGIN{exit ($num1 > $num2 ? 0 : 1)}". – Ed Morton Jun 2 at 14:40

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