2

I have the following code in Perl. I am very new to the language:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $date = $ARGV[0];

my $symbols = ('A', 'B', 'C');


foreach $symbol (%symbols)
{
    my $print = "$symbol";
    print "$print";

}

Getting:

Useless use of a constant in void context at (line of %symbols)
and
Global symbol "$symbol requires explicit package name at ..."
and
Global symbol "%symbols" require explicit package. name at ..."
  • my $print = "$symbol"; print "$print"; is better written as just print $symbol; – Eric Strom Dec 28 '11 at 21:16
  • 2
    You can make use of perl's flexibility and use print for @symbols. Read the documentation for print and for (foreach) to see how that works. – TLP Dec 28 '11 at 21:20
7

You are using an Hash when an Array is all that is needed.

 #!/usr/bin/perl


    use strict;
    use warnings;

    my $date = $ARGV[0];

    my @symbols = ('A', 'B', 'C');


    foreach my $symbol (@symbols)
    {
        print $symbol;

    }
6

1) Your $symbols should be @symbols, since it's an array. Later in the foreach, %symbols should be @symbols.

2) The $symbol is not declared. Say foreach my $symbol... instead.

3

You are declaring $symbols instead of @symbols, so it is putting that in scalar context and setting it to 'C'. Then you try to loop through a hash with the same name, which you never created. Remember, $a (scalar), @a (array) and %a (hash) are all different.

This is what you wanted:

my @symbols = qw/ A B C /; ## the same as ( 'A', 'B', 'C' )
foreach my $symbol ( @symbols ) {
    print $symbol;
}

Really quick:

my @symbols = qw/ A B C /; ## new array with three values
my $symbols = qw/ A B C /; ## new scalar that is the last element of the "A B C" list ($symbols = 'C')
my %symbols = (
    A => 1,
    B => 2,
    C => 3,
); ## a hash with three key/value pairs
  • 1
    "setting it to 3"? Nope. "new scalar that is the size of the "A B C" array"? Nope. $symbols in the original code gets a value of "C", not a value of "3". A list is not an array... – tadmc Dec 28 '11 at 21:11
  • qw/.../ in scalar context returns the last element of the list, not the length of the list. – Eric Strom Dec 28 '11 at 21:13
  • It's not even a list. It's a bunch of scalars separated by the scalar comma. Perl doesn't construct any list. There is no "last element". There is only the rightmost element. :) – brian d foy Dec 28 '11 at 22:51
2

Your foreach is looking at each symbol in a non-existent hash called %symbols, not your array @symbols.

foreach $symbol (@symbols)
{
    my $print = "$symbol";
    print "$print";
}
  • 1
    Wow. Talk about a flood! Go team! – Jesse Smith Dec 28 '11 at 20:56

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