69

I am doing some performance tests and noticed that a LINQ expression like

result = list.First(f => f.Id == i).Property

is slower than

result = list.Where(f => f.Id == i).First().Property

This seems counter intuitive. I would have thought that the first expression would be faster because it can stop iterating over the list as soon as the predicate is satisfied, whereas I would have thought that the .Where() expression might iterate over the whole list before calling .First() on the resulting subset. Even if the latter does short circuit it should not be faster than using First directly, but it is.

Below are two really simple unit tests that illustrate this. When compiled with optimisation on TestWhereAndFirst is about 30% faster than TestFirstOnly on .Net and Silverlight 4. I have tried making the predicate return more results but the performance difference is the same.

Can any one explain why .First(fn) is slower than .Where(fn).First()? I see a similar counter intuitive result with .Count(fn) compared to .Where(fn).Count().

private const int Range = 50000;

private class Simple
{
   public int Id { get; set; }
   public int Value { get; set; }
}

[TestMethod()]
public void TestFirstOnly()
{
   List<Simple> list = new List<Simple>(Range);
   for (int i = Range - 1; i >= 0; --i)
   {
      list.Add(new Simple { Id = i, Value = 10 });
   }

   int result = 0;
   for (int i = 0; i < Range; ++i)
   {
      result += list.First(f => f.Id == i).Value;
   }

   Assert.IsTrue(result > 0);
}

[TestMethod()]
public void TestWhereAndFirst()
{
   List<Simple> list = new List<Simple>(Range);
   for (int i = Range - 1; i >= 0; --i)
   {
      list.Add(new Simple { Id = i, Value = 10 });
   }

   int result = 0;
   for (int i = 0; i < Range; ++i)
   {
      result += list.Where(f => f.Id == i).First().Value;
   }

   Assert.IsTrue(result > 0);
}
  • 5
    How are you timing it? – Erik Funkenbusch Dec 29 '11 at 4:09
  • 5
    Your initial thought is wrong though: LINQ does lazy compute, so when First() is called it will query (the return value of) Where(...) for just one match and never ask for another. So the exact same number of elements will be examined as when you call First(...) (i.e. directly with a predicate). – Jon Dec 29 '11 at 4:16
  • 1
    I get the same result, .Where().First() is .021 seconds and .First() is .037 seconds. This is with a simple list of ints. – Ry- Dec 29 '11 at 4:20
  • 4
  • 5
    @minitech You didn't call Reset() on your stopwatch; your test actually shows that First() being significantly faster. – Jay Dec 29 '11 at 5:06
50

I got the same results: where+first was quicker than first.

As Jon noted, Linq uses lazy evaluation so the performance should be (and is) broadly similar for both methods.

Looking in Reflector, First uses a simple foreach loop to iterate through the collection but Where has a variety of iterators specialised for different collection types (arrays, lists, etc.). Presumably this is what gives Where the small advantage.

  • 10
    But if I was a framework developer and just implemented First(fn) internally as return Where(fn).First() it will work exactly as the current implementation of First except faster! Seems like a bad oversight on Microsoft's part. – dazza Dec 29 '11 at 6:04
  • 1
    Quite. I guess nobody's ever thought about it. – arx Dec 29 '11 at 6:16
  • 4
    Also compare .Count(fn) with .Where(fn).Count(). The latter is faster due to the use of specialized iterators rather than the foreach used by .Count(fn) Using the convenience methods like .First(fn) and .Count(fn) leads to more concise code so seems like the right thing to do, but the .Where(fn).Method() is measurably faster. Grrrr! – dazza Dec 29 '11 at 20:46
  • 5
    Have a look at dotnetfiddle.net/k11nX6, you will be surprised that the answer is wrong. – Akash Kava Jul 26 '15 at 7:13
  • 6
    Try this now !!! dotnetfiddle.net/OrUUSG , your answer is wrong !!! try any combination and prove your answer right.The real answer is Where enumerable caches Enumerable that is advantage over old List/Array iterator, but that has nothing to do with what is fast. – Akash Kava Jul 27 '15 at 18:12

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