288

One way to stop form submission is to return false from your JavaScript function.

When the submit button is clicked, a validation function is called. I have a case in form validation. If that condition is met I call a function named returnToPreviousPage();

function returnToPreviousPage() {
    window.history.back();
}

I am using JavaScript and Dojo Toolkit.

Rather going back to the previous page, it submits the form. How can I abort this submission and return to the previous page?

3

16 Answers 16

399

You can use the return value of the function to prevent the form submission

<form name="myForm" onsubmit="return validateMyForm();"> 

and function like

<script type="text/javascript">
function validateMyForm()
{
  if(check if your conditions are not satisfying)
  { 
    alert("validation failed false");
    returnToPreviousPage();
    return false;
  }

  alert("validations passed");
  return true;
}
</script>

In case of Chrome 27.0.1453.116 m if above code does not work, please set the event handler's parameter's returnValue field to false to get it to work.

Thanks Sam for sharing information.

EDIT :

Thanks to Vikram for his workaround for if validateMyForm() returns false:

 <form onsubmit="event.preventDefault(); validateMyForm();">

where validateMyForm() is a function that returns false if validation fails. The key point is to use the name event. We cannot use for e.g. e.preventDefault()

13
  • 2
    Just a guess: it doesn't work for me in the latest version of Chrome.
    – Sam
    Jul 7, 2013 at 1:39
  • 7
    Anything that returns false doesn't seem to have any effect; Chrome still submits the form. For example, onsubmit="return false;". However, setting the event handler's parameter's returnValue field to false does work for me.
    – Sam
    Jul 8, 2013 at 4:21
  • 4
    Hi Sam / Hemant, can you provide code sample as for how to set event handler's parameter's returnValue field to false please.
    – JackDev
    Sep 2, 2013 at 2:03
  • 2
    I think since this is the accepted answer, it should probably tell how to do this properly. I along with JackDev, are wondering how to get this to work properly. As is, this does not work
    – Cruncher
    Nov 18, 2013 at 20:35
  • 2
    If validateMyForm() has errors return false will not be reached. So this may fail. After many hours, I found a solution that works and posted it below. May 14, 2014 at 5:25
156

Use prevent default

Dojo Toolkit

dojo.connect(form, "onsubmit", function(evt) {
    evt.preventDefault();
    window.history.back();
});

jQuery

$('#form').submit(function (evt) {
    evt.preventDefault();
    window.history.back();
});

Vanilla JavaScript

if (element.addEventListener) {
    element.addEventListener("submit", function(evt) {
        evt.preventDefault();
        window.history.back();
    }, true);
}
else {
    element.attachEvent('onsubmit', function(evt){
        evt.preventDefault();
        window.history.back();
    });
}
6
  • 7
    I would recommend event.preventDefault() over return false for a lot of reasons, this should be the top answer: blog.nmsdvid.com/…
    – acidjazz
    Sep 15, 2015 at 0:30
  • 3
    Good answer. Better than the chosen one.
    – Ani Menon
    Jun 12, 2016 at 14:49
  • 2
    Good, but where would you perform the validation the OP wants?
    – Sahand
    Jan 3, 2018 at 14:41
  • 1
    @acidjazz But how does one access the form data after preventing default?
    – CodeAt30
    Feb 18, 2018 at 11:11
  • @Sahand @codeat30 You can access the event target.
    – Adrien
    Mar 23, 2020 at 11:54
61

The following works as of now (tested in Chrome and Firefox):

<form onsubmit="event.preventDefault(); validateMyForm();">

Where validateMyForm() is a function that returns false if validation fails. The key point is to use the name event. We cannot use for e.g. e.preventDefault().

0
33

Base on @Vikram Pudi answer, we can also do like this with pure Javascript

<form onsubmit="submitForm(event)">
    <input type="text">
    <input type="submit">
</form>

<script type="text/javascript">

    function submitForm(event){
        event.preventDefault();


    }
</script>
20

Just use a simple button instead of a submit button. And call a JavaScript function to handle form submit:

<input type="button" name="submit" value="submit" onclick="submit_form();"/>

Function within a script tag:

function submit_form() {
    if (conditions) {
        document.forms['myform'].submit();
    }
    else {
        returnToPreviousPage();
    }
}

You can also try window.history.forward(-1);

2
  • I like this approach because it allows for my use case, callbacks.
    – Eddie
    Feb 21, 2013 at 1:47
  • 21
    This prevents the use of the enter key to submit the form. Also, new HTML5 attributes such as required won't work.
    – Sam
    Jul 7, 2013 at 1:40
12

Lots of hard ways to do an easy thing:

<form name="foo" onsubmit="return false">
6
  • 6
    This exact answer (OK, not exact, since yours is missing a semi-colon) was submitted 8 months earlier, and has negative votes for good reason. This works most of the time. But not on all browsers all of the time.
    – Auspex
    Sep 28, 2017 at 8:25
  • 6
    I didn't say you needed a semicolon; I pointed out that that was all that was different between your answer and a much older one. The fact that you are now asking me to point out which browsers don't support it (I never said there were any, I merely pointed out that it won't always work), proves that you still haven't read this whole page.
    – Auspex
    Oct 3, 2017 at 18:38
  • 3
    I don't usually examine the down-votes, except I didn't know that people were down-voting correct code. Technically, the semicolon is extraneous, so it's wrong. And you said "yours is missing the semicolon" implying that it's needed, which is wrong. You say it "won't always work" but you can't point out a single case or browser where it won't work? This is sound logic? It's correct code. So unless you can point out the case where it won't work, then you don't have a point at all.
    – Danial
    Oct 3, 2017 at 19:56
  • How does this not have more upvotes? It's far more terse compared to the other examples. Jun 1, 2020 at 17:02
  • Probably because the title doesn't match what the guy was actually asking.
    – Danial
    Jun 3, 2020 at 4:28
9

All your answers gave something to work with.

FINALLY, this worked for me: (if you dont choose at least one checkbox item, it warns and stays in the same page)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form name="helloForm" action="HelloWorld" method="GET"  onsubmit="valthisform();">
            <br>
            <br><b> MY LIKES </b>
            <br>
            First Name: <input type="text" name="first_name" required>
            <br />
            Last Name: <input type="text" name="last_name"  required />
            <br>
            <input type="radio" name="modifyValues" value="uppercase" required="required">Convert to uppercase <br>
            <input type="radio" name="modifyValues" value="lowercase" required="required">Convert to lowercase <br>
            <input type="radio" name="modifyValues" value="asis"      required="required" checked="checked">Do not convert <br>
            <br>
            <input type="checkbox" name="c1" value="maths"     /> Maths
            <input type="checkbox" name="c1" value="physics"   /> Physics
            <input type="checkbox" name="c1" value="chemistry" /> Chemistry
            <br>

            <button onclick="submit">Submit</button>

            <!-- input type="submit" value="submit" / -->
            <script>
                <!---
                function valthisform() {
                    var checkboxs=document.getElementsByName("c1");
                    var okay=false;
                    for(var i=0,l=checkboxs.length;i<l;i++) {
                        if(checkboxs[i].checked) {
                            okay=true;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                    if (!okay) { 
                        alert("Please check a checkbox");
                        event.preventDefault();
                    } else {
                    }
                }
                -->
            </script>
        </form>
    </body>
</html>
1
  • Worked for me also.
    – chetan
    Jul 12, 2016 at 16:11
6

I would recommend not using onsubmit and instead attaching an event in the script.

var submit = document.getElementById("submitButtonId");
if (submit.addEventListener) {
  submit.addEventListener("click", returnToPreviousPage);
} else {
  submit.attachEvent("onclick", returnToPreviousPage);
}

Then use preventDefault() (or returnValue = false for older browsers).

function returnToPreviousPage (e) {
  e = e || window.event;
  // validation code

  // if invalid
  if (e.preventDefault) {
    e.preventDefault();
  } else {
    e.returnValue = false;
  }
}
3
  • 2
    Could you explain why you wouldn't use onsubmit? Nov 26, 2018 at 9:02
  • Maybe it's just preference, but I find it easier to understand the functionality of a web page if all event listeners are attached using JS instead of HTML using attributes. That way you don't need to jump back and forth as much while reading someone else's code Nov 26, 2018 at 15:38
  • what if someone presses enter on one of the inputs instead of clicking the button? in general ii still submits ... May 19, 2020 at 8:29
2

Lets say you have a form similar to this

<form action="membersDeleteAllData.html" method="post">
    <button type="submit" id="btnLoad" onclick="confirmAction(event);">ERASE ALL DATA</button>
</form>

Here is the javascript for the confirmAction function

<script type="text/javascript">
    function confirmAction(e)
    {
        var confirmation = confirm("Are you sure about this ?") ;

        if (!confirmation)
        {
            e.preventDefault() ;
            returnToPreviousPage();
        }

        return confirmation ;
    }
</script>

This one works on Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer(edge), Safari, etc.

If that is not the case let me know

1
  • 1
    The combination of preventDefault() and returnToPreviousPage() is perfect and elegant. It interrupts normal operation just like you'd design any exception catcher to work. +1. Apr 9, 2020 at 21:03
2

E.g if you have submit button on form ,inorder to stop its propogation simply write event.preventDefault(); in the function which is called upon clicking submit button or enter button.

2

Simply do it....

<form>
<!-- Your Input Elements -->
</form>

and here goes your JQuery

$(document).on('submit', 'form', function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    //your code goes here
    //100% works
    return;
});
1
  • 5
    y do u have used jquery here? Nov 12, 2019 at 7:40
2

Most simple and short code

<form onsubmit="return false">

For better cross-browser compatibility and maintainability, you can use JavaScript to attach an event listener to the form element and prevent the default form submission behavior

<form id="myForm">
  <!-- Form fields and elements -->
  <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

<script>
  document.getElementById('myForm').addEventListener('submit', function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    // Additional logic or actions
  });
</script>
1

Hemant and Vikram's answers didn't quite work for me outright in Chrome. The event.preventDefault(); script prevented the the page from submitting regardless of passing or failing the validation. Instead, I had to move the event.preventDefault(); into the if statement as follows:

    if(check if your conditions are not satisfying) 
    { 
    event.preventDefault();
    alert("validation failed false");
    returnToPreviousPage();
    return false;
    }
    alert("validations passed");
    return true;
    }

Thanks to Hemant and Vikram for putting me on the right track.

1
  • Worked for me too. Thanks.
    – ivbtar
    Jan 3, 2019 at 17:07
1

Disabling submit button also can help to prevent form submission.

<input style="display:none" type="submit" disabled>

1
1

Even though it seems obvious it should be noted that you will also have to then submit your form if the validation is good to go if you block submitting with prevent default. I provided a complete example below of validating doc type and then submitting if its the right doc type.

<h2>Document Upload</h2>
<script>
var CanContinue = false;

function validateMyForm()
{
if(CanContinue == false)
  { 
    alert("You must upload a PDF, PNG, or JPG of your document.");


return false;

  }
  document.getElementById("myForm").submit();

  return true;
}

function getFileNameWithExt(event) {

  if (!event || !event.target || !event.target.files || event.target.files.length === 0) {
return;
  }

  const name = event.target.files[0].name;
  const lastDot = name.lastIndexOf('.');

  const fileName = name.substring(0, lastDot);
  const ext = (name.substring(lastDot + 1)).toUpperCase();
    if (ext =="JPG") {
    extension.value = "image/jpeg";
    CanContinue = true;

} else if (ext =="JPEG") {
  extension.value = "image/jpeg";
  CanContinue = true;

} else if (ext =="PNG") {
  extension.value = "image/png";
  CanContinue = true;

} else if (ext =="PDF") {
  extension.value = "application/pdf";
  CanContinue = true;

} else {
  alert("You must upload a PDF, PNG, or JPG of your document.");
  CanContinue = false;
}

  outputfile.value = fileName;


}

</script>


                <form method="post" id="myForm" action="/wheregoing" enctype="multipart/form-data" onsubmit="event.preventDefault(); validateMyForm();">
                
                Please upload a JPG, PNG, or PDF of the front of the document.
                <input id='inputfile' type="file" name="dafile" onChange='getFileNameWithExt(event)' required>
               
             <input id='extension' type='hidden' name='ContentType' value="">
                <input type="submit">
                </form>
0

Use preventDefault to stop form submission.

<form onSubmit="submitForm(event)">
    <input name="field" />
    <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
</form>
<script>
    const submitForm = (event) => {
        event.preventDefault();
        // ... do something
        return false;
    }
</script>

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