Even though the linux man page for wait 1 explains very well that you need to wait() for child processes for them no to turn into zombies, it does not tell why at all.

I planned my program (which is my first multithreaded one, so excuse my naivity) around a for(;;)ever loop that starts child processes which get exec()ed away and are sure to terminate on their own.

I cannot use wait(NULL) because that makes parallel computation impossible, therefore I'll probably have to add a process table that stores the child pids and have to use waitpid - not immideately, but after some time has passed - which is a problem, because the running time of the children varies from few microseconds to several minutes. If I use waitpid too early, my parent process will get blocked, when I use it too late, I get overwhelmed by zombies and cannot fork() anymore, which is not only bad for my process, but can cause unexpected problems on the whole system.

I'll probably have to program some logic of using some maximum number of children and block the parent when that number is reached - but that should be not necessary because most of the children terminate quickly. The other solution that I can think of (creating a two-tiered parent process that spawns concurrent children which in turn concurrently spawn and wait for grandchildren) is too complicated for me right now. Possibly I could also find a non-blocking function to check for the children and use waitpid only when they have terminated.

Nevertheless the question:

Why does Linux keep zombies at all? Why do I have to wait for my children? Is this to enforce discipline on parent processes? In decades of using Linux I have never got anything useful out of zombie processes, I don't quite get the usefulness of zombies as a "feature".

If the answer is that parent processes need to have a way to find out what happened to their children, then for god's sake there is no reason to count zombies as normal processes and forbid the creation of non-zombie processes just because there are too many zombies. On the system I'm currently developing for I can only spawn 400 to 500 processes before everything grinds to halt (it's a badly maintained CentOS system running on the cheapest VServer I could find - but still 400 zombies are less than a few kB of information)

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'll probably have to add a process table that stores the child pids and have to use waitpid - not immideately, but after some time has passed - which is a problem, because the running time of the children varies from few microseconds to several minutes. If I use waitpid too early, my parent process will get blocked

Check out the documentation for waitpid. You can tell waitpid to NOT block (i.e., return immediately if there are no children to reap) using the WNOHANG option. Moreover, you don't need to give waitpid a PID. You can specify -1, and it will wait for any child. So calling waitpid as below fits your no-blocking constraint and no-saving-pids constraint:

waitpid( -1, &status, WNOHANG );

If you really don't want to properly handle process creation, then you can give the reaping responsibility to init by forking twice, reaping the child, and giving the exec to the grandchild:

pid_t temp_pid, child_pid;
temp_pid = fork();
if( temp_pid == 0 ){
    child_pid = fork();
    if( child_pid == 0 ){
        // exec()
        error( EXIT_FAILURE, errno, "failed to exec :(" );
    } else if( child_pid < 0 ){
        error( EXIT_FAILURE, errno, "failed to fork :(" );
    }
    exit( EXIT_SUCCESS );
} else if( temp_pid < 0 ){
    error( EXIT_FAILURE, errno, "failed to fork :(" );
} else {
    wait( temp_pid );
}

In the above code snippet, the child process forks its own child, immediately exists, and then is immediately reaped by the parent. The grandchild is orphaned, adopted by init, and will be reaped automatically.

Why does Linux keep zombies at all? Why do I have to wait for my children? Is this to enforce discipline on parent processes? In decades of using Linux I have never got anything useful out of zombie processes, I don't quite get the usefulness of zombies as a "feature". If the answer is that parent processes need to have a way to find out what happened to their children, then for god's sake there is no reason to count zombies as normal processes and forbid the creation of non-zombie processes just because there are too many zombies.

How else do you propose one may efficiently retrieve the exit code of a process? The problem is that the mapping of PID <=> exit code (et al.) must be one to one. If the kernel released the PID of a process as soon as it exits, reaped or not, and then a new process inherits that same PID and exits, how would you handle storing two codes for one PID? How would an interested process retrieve the exit code for the first process? Don't assume that no one cares about exit codes simply because you don't. What you consider to be a nuisance/bug is widely considered useful and clean.

On the system I'm currently developing for I can only spawn 400 to 500 processes before everything grinds to halt (it's a badly maintained CentOS system running on the cheapest VServer I could find - but still 400 zombies are less than a few kB of information)

Something about making a widely accepted kernel behavior a scapegoat for what are clearly frustrations over a badly-maintained/cheap system doesn't seem right.

Typically, your maximum number of processes is limited only by your memory. You can see your limit with:

cat /proc/sys/kernel/threads-max
  • Other than exit code are there any other reasons? My understanding was that zombies are kept so that parents can have access to the resources of the child. However I can't think of a scenario where the child creates a resource and then the parent accesses it. – tinkerbeast Aug 28 '15 at 10:39
  • No, the "zombie" is only the PID of the child and its exit code. All other resources associated with the child are freed (memory, open files, etc.). – Christopher Neylan Aug 28 '15 at 17:16

Your reasoning is backwards: The kernel keeps zombies because they store the state that you can retrieve with wait() and related system calls.

The proper way to handle asynchronous child termination is to have a SIGCHLD handler which does the wait() to clean up the child processes.

  • Or explicitly ignoring the SIGCHLD, as described in Notes section of the manpage linked by OP, if you just don't care when they terminate and with what result. – Amadan Dec 29 '11 at 8:53

When a program exits, it returns a return code to the kernel. A zombie process is simply a place to hold the return code until the parent can obtain it. The wait() call lets the kernel know that the return code for that pid is no longer needed, and the zombie is removed.

  • Yeah, that was my fear (see last paragraph). Shouldn't it be considered a bug (and not a feature) that Linux can only hold a few hundred process exit-codes? – Robby75 Dec 29 '11 at 9:04
  • I suspect your system is misconfigured. Do you have a ulimit set that limits the maximum number of processes per user? – Greg Hewgill Dec 29 '11 at 9:19
  • ulimit yields "unlimited" – Robby75 Dec 29 '11 at 9:45

Although keeping dead pid in process table is basically for providing it's exit code to its parent later,

I have to complain that there are some bad design there(but already became history and unchangeable).

1. Can not pre-declare that i_don_care_status_of( pid )

On Windows OS, we have a close( processHandle ) to achieve this effect.

HANDLE aProcessHandle = CreateProcess(.....);
CloseHandle( aProcessHandle )

To overcoming this, there are some non-perfect methods (from Wiki):

On modern UNIX-like systems (that comply with SUSv3 specification in this respect), the following special case applies: if the parent explicitly ignores SIGCHLD by setting its handler to SIG_IGN (rather than simply ignoring the signal by default) or has the SA_NOCLDWAIT flag set, all child exit status information will be discarded and no zombie processes will be left.[1]

2. No reference-counter based handling of pid.

When a process is dead, if there are no reference to the pid, then kernel can remove it immediately.

3. Can not get exit code of unrelated pid

Only parent can get exit code of a pid, this is ridiculous. There are no reliable way to wait for a unrelated pid.

(Use NETLINK + PROC_CONNECTOR can listen exit event of any pid asynchronously).

On Windows, it can be done by WaitForSingleObject

HANDLE aProcessHandle = OpenProcess( pid... );
WaitForSingleObject(aProcessHandle, ...);

These shortcomings are apparently there, but Unix/Linux's design is very simple, so we have to bare it.

  • "UNIX is very simple, it just needs a genius to understand its simplicity." You have to bare it. – ntysdd Sep 7 '17 at 9:26
  • Of course, see the last statement i had written there: "These shortcomings are apparently there, but Unix/Linux's design is very simple, so we have to bare it.". I just want help curious programmers to understand the reason and what's bad. – osexp2003 Sep 8 '17 at 5:00

In order to provide you with "exitcode" of the process the system should preserve the "process database" for you. Such database with just an exit code is called "zombie". You may use separate process that will be periodically querying "zombie processes" for their "exitcode" thus effectively freeing this memory. The same will be true for Windows and other operating systems. Linux isn't special here. You don't need to wait for process, just ask its "exit code" after the process finished.

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