43

I was looking for some standard PHP function to replace some value of an array with other, but surprisingly I haven't found any, so I have to write my own:

function array_replace_value(&$ar, $value, $replacement)
{
    if (($key = array_search($ar, $value)) !== FALSE) {
        $ar[$key] = $replacement;
    }
}

But I still wonder - for such an easy thing there must already be some function for it! Or maybe much easier solution than this one invented by me?

Note that this function will only do one replacement. I'm looking for existing solutions that similarly replace a single occurrence, as well as those that replace all occurrences.

12
  • Note that arrays are passed by value. You'll either need to return the new array from the function (matching the behavior of the rest of the array_* functions) or make array_replace_value take $ar by reference.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:29
  • str_replace() takes arrays, but you can't limit it to one replacement.
    – goat
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:42
  • Thanks @outis, I realized this myself during debugging in the meantime :)
    – Tomas
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:42
  • @Tomas: when you note the function only performs one replacement, are you pointing out a flaw or noting the desired behavior?
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 15:41
  • @outis, actually, both :) Now it is desired but for another uses it might become a flaw :)
    – Tomas
    Dec 29, 2011 at 15:42

12 Answers 12

39

Instead of a function that only replaces occurrences of one value in an array, there's the more general array_map:

array_map(function ($v) use ($value, $replacement) {
    return $v == $value ? $replacement : $v;
}, $arr);

To replace multiple occurrences of multiple values using array of value => replacement:

array_map(function ($v) use ($replacement) {
    return isset($replacement[$v]) ? $replacement[$v] : $v;
}, $arr);

To replace a single occurrence of one value, you'd use array_search as you do. Because the implementation is so short, there isn't much reason for the PHP developers to create a standard function to perform the task. Not to say that it doesn't make sense for you to create such a function, if you find yourself needing it often.

5
  • +1. thanks outis for nice answer, I didn't know this syntax, however using map and custom code is a strong tool for this - might be inefficient? I prefer "hardcoded" solution like the Raghav's.
    – Tomas
    Jan 7, 2012 at 12:15
  • @Tomas: is the syntax you're referring to anonymous functions and closures? Excepting the additional of the "use" specifier, that's more semantics than syntax. As for efficiency, if there is an impact, it's negligible (unless you're performing replacements on perhaps thousands of arrays with each request). One factor affecting performance is that each call to an array_* function will create an additional array as its result: one here, three in Raghav's. As always, profiling is the best way of determining performance.
    – outis
    Jan 7, 2012 at 22:59
  • 1
    ... Note that Raghav's doesn't have anything hardcoded that this doesn't, as they all have the same values paramaterized (the array, the value to replace and the replacement value). Hardcoding anything rarely gives a noticeable performance benefit, as the cost of variable lookup is small.
    – outis
    Jan 7, 2012 at 22:59
  • thanks outis for your answers... however finally I was lucky to use Raghav's solution for one reason: the server of our hosting provider is still running PHP 5.2, so I had to remove all anonymous functions from my code... (I developed on PHP 5.3, so it was a little "betrayal"...)
    – Tomas
    Jan 12, 2012 at 9:22
  • @Tomas: I feel your pain. Support for closures is what made PHP bearable.
    – outis
    Jan 12, 2012 at 9:27
32

While there isn't one function equivalent to the sample code, you can use array_keys (with the optional search value parameter), array_fill and array_replace to achieve the same thing:

EDIT by Tomas: the code was not working, corrected it:

$ar = array_replace($ar,
    array_fill_keys(
        array_keys($ar, $value),
        $replacement
    )
);
5
  • Doesn't array_replace() assume you already know the keys? The OP is looking to search and replace by value. Dec 29, 2011 at 14:14
  • array_replace replaces by key, not value.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:15
  • @RaghavBhushan: if you have the key, you don't need array_replace.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:20
  • @RaghavBhushan: (about your original write-up) <br/> isn't semantic. Moreover, you don't need it on SO.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 14:26
  • @RaghavBhushan: Tomas' function already uses array_search to find a single item to replace, and the first part of this answer already covers array_replace.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 15:40
14

If performance is an issue, one may consider not to create multiple functions within array_map(). Note that isset() is extremely fast, and this solutions does not call any other functions at all.

$replacements = array(
    'search1' => 'replace1',
    'search2' => 'replace2',
    'search3' => 'replace3'
);
foreach ($a as $key => $value) {
    if (isset($replacements[$value])) {
        $a[$key] = $replacements[$value];
    }
}
7

Try this function.

public function recursive_array_replace ($find, $replace, $array) {
    if (!is_array($array)) {
        return str_replace($find, $replace, $array);
    }

    $newArray = [];
    foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
        $newArray[$key] = recursive_array_replace($find, $replace, $value);
    }
    return $newArray;
}

Cheers!

1
  • This unexplained recursive code makes partial matches/replacements, not necessarily whole value replacements. Dec 13, 2022 at 11:37
6

$ar[array_search('green', $ar)] = 'value';

2
  • 4
    Can you add some explanation to your code? What if array_search returns false?
    – Nico Haase
    Mar 11, 2019 at 15:23
  • I do not recommend that researchers use this unstable and unexplained snippet. Feb 13, 2021 at 17:44
4

Depending whether it's the value, the key or both you want to find and replace on you could do something like this:

$array = json_decode( str_replace( $replace, $with, json_encode( $array ) ), true );

I'm not saying this is the most efficient or elegant, but nice and simple.

1
  • This makes partial matches/replacements, not necessarily whole value replacements. Dec 13, 2022 at 11:36
4

What about array_walk() with callback?

$array = ['*pasta', 'cola', 'pizza'];
$search = '*';
$replace = '\*';
array_walk($array,
    function (&$v) use ($search, $replace){
        $v = str_replace($search, $replace, $v);    
    }                                                                     
);  
print_r($array);
1
  • This makes partial matches/replacements, not necessarily whole value replacements. Dec 13, 2022 at 11:34
1

Based on Deept Raghav's answer, I created the follow solution that does regular expression search.

$arr = [
    'Array Element 1',
    'Array Element 2',
    'Replace Me',
    'Array Element 4',
];

$arr = array_replace(
    $arr,
    array_fill_keys(
        array_keys(
            preg_grep('/^Replace/', $arr)
        ),
        'Array Element 3'
    )
);

echo '<pre>', var_export($arr), '</pre>';

PhpFiddle: http://phpfiddle.org/lite/code/un7u-j1pt

1
  • This makes partial matches/replacements, not necessarily whole value replacements. Dec 13, 2022 at 11:37
1

PHP 8, a strict version to replace one string value into another:

array_map(static fn (string $value): string => $value === $find ? $replace : $value, $array); 

An example - replace value foo by bar:

array_map(static fn (string $value): string => $value === 'foo' ? 'bar' : $value, $array);
1
  • i like your answer but still setting $find and $replace remains challenge. pass a static string is still challange Apr 20, 2022 at 8:43
0

You can make full string matches without specifying the keys of qualifying values, by calling preg_replace() with a pattern containing start and end of string anchors (^, $). If your search term may contain characters which have a special meaning to the regex engine, then be sure to escape them with preg_quote() to avoid breakage. While regex is not entirely called for, regex offers some very convenient ways to tweak the search term handling. (Demo)

function array_replace_value(&$ar, $value, $replacement)
{
    $ar = preg_replace(
              '/^' . preg_quote($value, '/') . '$/',
              $replacement,
              $ar
          );
}

I might be more inclined to use array_map() with arrow function syntax so that global variables can be accessed within the custom function scope. (Demo)

$needle = 'foo';
$newValue = 'bar';

var_export(
    array_map(fn($v) => $v === $needle ? $newValue : $v, $array)
);
0
$ar = array(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8);
$find = array(2,3);
$replace = array(13);

function update_bundle_package($ar,$find,$replace){
foreach ($find as $x => $y) {
    ///TO REMOVE PACKAGE
    if (($key = array_search($y, $ar)) !== false) {
        unset($ar[$key]);
    }
    ///TO REMOVE PACKAGE
}
$ar = array_merge($ar, $replace); 
}
1
  • 1
    The asker said: "I'm looking for existing solutions that similarly replace a single occurrence, as well as those that replace all occurrences." array_search() will only ever find the first occurrence. Dec 22, 2022 at 21:19
-1
 <b>$green_key = array_search('green', $input); // returns the first key whose value is 'green'

$input[$green_key] = 'apple'; // replace 'green' with 'apple'

2
  • 1
    This is basically what Tomas has, but this doesn't handle the case where a value isn't present in the array.
    – outis
    Dec 29, 2011 at 15:54
  • The question says: "I'm looking for existing solutions that similarly replace a single occurrence, as well as those that replace all occurrences." but this approach will only find the first occurrence. Dec 13, 2022 at 21:37

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