7

How would you write a regular expression to define all strings of 0's and 1's that, as a binary number, represent an integer that is multiple of 3.

Some valid binary numbers would be:

11
110
1001
1100
1111
4
  • 4
    Is this your computational theory homework? May 15, 2009 at 6:47
  • maybe you could give some background like what do you want to do and which language you want to use.
    – Tim Büthe
    May 15, 2009 at 6:48
  • a part of it. i think i have the correct NFA but cant seem to eliminate the middle steps as its quite complicated.
    – Jaelebi
    May 15, 2009 at 6:51
  • 1
    dd get it. The answer is (1(01*0)*1)*0*
    – Jaelebi
    May 15, 2009 at 7:56

4 Answers 4

24

Using the DFA here we can make a regular expression the following way, where A, B, C represent the states of the DFA.

A = 1B + 0A
B = 1A + 0C
C = 1C + 0B

C = 1*0B // Eliminate recursion

B = 1A + 0(1*0B)
B = 01*0B + 1A
B = (01*0)*1A // Eliminate recursion

A = 1(01*0)*1A + 0A
A = (1(01*0)*1 + 0)A
A = (1(01*0)*1 + 0)* // Eliminate recursion

Resulting in a PCRE regex like:

/^(1(01*0)*1|0)+$/

Perl test/example:

use strict;

for(qw(
11
110
1001
1100
1111
0
1
10
111
)){
    print "$_ (", eval "0b$_", ") ";
    print /^(1(01*0)*1|0)+$/? "matched": "didnt match";
    print "\n";
}

Outputs:

11 (3) matched
110 (6) matched
1001 (9) matched
1100 (12) matched
1111 (15) matched
0 (0) matched
1 (1) didnt match
10 (2) didnt match
111 (7) didnt match
2
  • +1. Now this is great. I had no idea you could create a regular expression that easy from a DFA. May 15, 2009 at 8:13
  • Thank you for masterclass. I think I won't mark this task on Codewars as completed, as I wouldn't do it myself.
    – Minras
    Jul 11, 2017 at 17:50
9

When you divide a number by three, there are only three possible remainders (0, 1 and 2). What you're aiming at is to ensure the remainder is 0, hence a multiple of three.

This can be done by an automaton with the three states:

  • ST0, multiple of 3 (0, 3, 6, 9, ....).
  • ST1, multiple of 3 plus 1 (1, 4, 7, 10, ...).
  • ST2, multiple of 3 plus 2 (2, 5, 8, 11, ...).

Now think of any non-negative number (that's our domain) and multiply it by two (tack a binary zero on to the end). The transitions for that are:

ST0 -> ST0 (3n * 2 = 3 * 2n, still a multiple of three).
ST1 -> ST2 ((3n+1) * 2 = 3*2n + 2, a multiple of three, plus 2).
ST2 -> ST1 ((3n+2) * 2 = 3*2n + 4 = 3*(2n+1) + 1, a multiple of three, plus 1).

Also think of any non-negative number, multiply it by two then add one (tack a binary one on to the end). The transitions for that are:

ST0 -> ST1 (3n * 2 + 1 = 3*2n + 1, a multiple of three, plus 1).
ST1 -> ST0 ((3n+1) * 2 + 1 = 3*2n + 2 + 1 = 3*(2n+1), a multiple of three).
ST2 -> ST2 ((3n+2) * 2 + 1 = 3*2n + 4 + 1 = 3*(2n+1) + 2, a multiple of three, plus 2).

This idea is that, at the end, you need to finish up in state ST0. However, given that there can be an arbitrary number of sub-expressions (and sub-sub-expressions), it does not lend itself easily to reduction to a regular expression.

What you have to do is allow for any of the transition sequences that can get from ST0 to ST0 then just repeat them:

These boil down to the two RE sequences:

ST0 --> ST0                                      :  0+
    [0]
ST0 --> ST1 (--> ST2 (--> ST2)* --> ST1)* --> ST0:  1(01*0)*1
    [1]     ([0]     ([1]    )* [0]    )* [1]

or the regex:

(0+|1(01*0)*1)+

This captures the multiples of three, or at least the first ten that I tested. You can try as many as you like, they'll all work, that's the beauty of mathematical analysis rather than anecdotal evidence.

1
  • I liked your explanation, btw just for clarification for those who read this answer, you need to add ^ at the beginning, in order to get a working regex. Dec 21, 2020 at 13:52
0

The answer is (1(01*0)*10*)*, which is the only one so far that works for 110011

-1

I don't think you would. I can't believe in any language using a regular expression could ever be the best way to do this.

4
  • i know its not the best way. I know it can be done but I just cant figure out how. It involves drawing the automata and eliminating middle states.
    – Jaelebi
    May 15, 2009 at 6:44
  • 3
    @Dave Webb, you can definitely do this. Actually, this is a pretty common sort of exercise in a CS Theory course, which is why I'm hesitant to answer this question. May 15, 2009 at 6:46
  • @Dave Webb The answer is (1(01*0)*1)*0*
    – Jaelebi
    May 15, 2009 at 7:57
  • @unknowh yahoo, not quite right, that won't work for 17 * 3 = 51 (110011). You need to allow for repetitions at more levels.
    – paxdiablo
    May 15, 2009 at 8:37

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