-1

Code:

    #include "stdafx.h"
    #include <iostream>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <string.h>

    using namespace std;
    int main()
        {
            ifstream fin ("ride.in.txt");
            ofstream fout ("ride.out.txt");
            int ta, tb;unsigned int i;
            ta = tb = 1;
            string a, b;
            fin >> a >> b;
            for (i = 0; i < a.size(); i++)
                ta = ta * (a[i] - 'A' + 1) % 47;
            for (i = 0; i < b.size(); i++)
                tb = tb * (b[i] - 'A' + 1) % 47;
            if (ta == tb)
                fout << "GO" << endl;
            else    
                fout << "STAY" << endl;
            return 0;
        }

Error:

error C2679: 
binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type  “std::string”
  • 1
    There is no question, and the code compiles (when removing the not-provided precompiled header) on clang. – Andre Dec 30 '11 at 12:49
  • 2
    It will compile on any compiler who's library happens to include <string> in <fstream> or <iostream>. One C++ standard header is allowed to include any other standard header. – Bo Persson Dec 30 '11 at 14:56
  • I don't understand why this was closed. It is a real question and there are answers to it. Anyway, there's answers to a similar question here. – sbi Jul 13 '18 at 23:24
17

I think the problem is:

#include <string.h>

change to:

#include <string>
5

The std::string operators are defined in the <string> header.

The header <string.h> is for C-style string functions.

  • Actually, in C++, the header <string.h> doesn't even exist. The content of the C header of that name can be found (wrapped in namespace std) in <cstring>. – sbi Jul 13 '18 at 23:25
  • 1
    The header is still part of the C++ standard, even though it is hidden in Annex D (Compatibility features / deprecated). – Bo Persson Jul 14 '18 at 9:24
  • Ah, thanks for the correction! – sbi Jul 15 '18 at 13:07

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