16

Okay, the following link has a warning that the discussion uses unsupported and undocumented apis. Well I'm trying to use the code sample any way. It mostly works. Any ideas about the specific issue below relating to exceptions?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164086.aspx

FYI, I made an improvement over the original sample. It was maintaining a pointer to the "previousfiber". Instead, the updated sample below uses a "mainfiber" pointer which gets passed to every fiber class. In that way, they always yield back to the main fiber. That allows the main fiber to handle scheduling for all other fibers. The other fibers always "yield" back to the main fiber.

The reason for posting this question has to do with throwing exceptions inside a fiber. According to the article, by using the CorBindToRunTime API with CreateLogicalThreadState(), SwitchOutLogicalThreadState(), etc, the framework will create a managed thread for each fiber and properly handle exceptions.

However, in the included code examples it has an UUnit test which experiments with throwing a managed exception within a Fiber and also catching it within the same fiber. That soft of works. But after handling it by logging a message, it seems the stack is in a bad state because if the fiber calls any other method even an empty method, the whole application crashes.

This implies to me that SwitchOutLogicalThreadState() and SwitchInLogicalThreadState() maybe aren't being used properly or else maybe they're not doing their job.

NOTE: One clue to the problem is that the managed code logs out the Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId and it is the same for every fiber. This suggests that the CreateLogicalThreadState() method didn't really create a new managed thread as advertised.

To analyze this better, I have made a pseudocode listing of the order of low level APIs called to handle the fibers. Remember, that fibers all run on the same thread so there's nothing concurrently happening, it's a linear logic. The necessary trick of course is to save and restore the stack. That's where it seems to be having trouble.

It starts out as simply a thread so then it converts to a fiber:

  1. ConvertThreadToFiber(objptr);
  2. CreateFiber() // create several win32 fibers.

Now invoke a fiber the first time, it's startup method does this:

  1. corhost->SwitchOutLogicalThreadState(&cookie); The main cookie is held on the stack.
  2. SwitchToFiber(); // first time calls the fiber startup method
  3. corhost->CreateLogicalThreadState();
  4. run the main fiber abstract method.

Eventually the fiber needs to yield back to the main fiber:

  1. corhost->SwitchOutLogicalThreadState(&cookie);
  2. SwitchToFiber(fiber);
  3. corhost->SwitchInLogicalThreadState(&cookie); // the main fiber cookie, right?

Also the main fiber will resume a preexisting fiber:

  1. corhost->SwitchOutLogicalThreadState(&cookie);
  2. SwitchToFiber(fiber);
  3. corhost->SwitchInLogicalThreadState(&cookie); // the main fiber cookie, right?

The following is fibers.cpp which wraps the fiber api for managed code.

#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x400

#using <mscorlib.dll>
#include <windows.h>
#include <mscoree.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#if defined(Yield)
#undef Yield
#endif

#define CORHOST

namespace Fibers {

typedef System::Runtime::InteropServices::GCHandle GCHandle;

VOID CALLBACK unmanaged_fiberproc(PVOID pvoid);

__gc private struct StopFiber {};

enum FiberStateEnum {
    FiberCreated, FiberRunning, FiberStopPending, FiberStopped
};

#pragma unmanaged

#if defined(CORHOST)
ICorRuntimeHost *corhost;

void initialize_corhost() {
    CorBindToCurrentRuntime(0, CLSID_CorRuntimeHost,
        IID_ICorRuntimeHost, (void**) &corhost);
}

#endif

void CorSwitchToFiber(void *fiber) {
#if defined(CORHOST)
    DWORD *cookie;
    corhost->SwitchOutLogicalThreadState(&cookie);
#endif
    SwitchToFiber(fiber);
#if defined(CORHOST)
    corhost->SwitchInLogicalThreadState(cookie);
#endif
}

#pragma managed

__gc __abstract public class Fiber : public System::IDisposable {
public:
#if defined(CORHOST)
    static Fiber() { initialize_corhost(); }
#endif
    Fiber() : state(FiberCreated) {
        void *objptr = (void*) GCHandle::op_Explicit(GCHandle::Alloc(this));
        fiber = ConvertThreadToFiber(objptr);
        mainfiber = fiber;
        //System::Console::WriteLine( S"Created main fiber.");
}

    Fiber(Fiber *_mainfiber) : state(FiberCreated) {
        void *objptr = (void*) GCHandle::op_Explicit(GCHandle::Alloc(this));
        fiber = CreateFiber(0, unmanaged_fiberproc, objptr);
        mainfiber = _mainfiber->fiber;
        //System::Console::WriteLine(S"Created worker fiber");
    }

    __property bool get_IsRunning() {
        return state != FiberStopped;
    }

    int GetHashCode() {
        return (int) fiber;
    }


    bool Resume() {
        if(!fiber || state == FiberStopped) {
            return false;
        }
        if( state == FiberStopPending) {
            Dispose();
            return false;
        }
        void *current = GetCurrentFiber();
        if(fiber == current) {
            return false;
        }
        CorSwitchToFiber(fiber);
        return true;
    }

    void Dispose() {
        if(fiber) {
            void *current = GetCurrentFiber();
            if(fiber == current) {
                state = FiberStopPending;
                CorSwitchToFiber(mainfiber);
            }
            state = FiberStopped;
            System::Console::WriteLine( S"\nDeleting Fiber.");
            DeleteFiber(fiber);
            fiber = 0;
        }
    }
protected:
    virtual void Run() = 0;


    void Yield() {
        CorSwitchToFiber(mainfiber);
        if(state == FiberStopPending)
            throw new StopFiber;
    }
private:
    void *fiber, *mainfiber;
    FiberStateEnum state;

private public:
    void main() {
        state = FiberRunning;
        try {
            Run();
        } catch(System::Object *x) {
            System::Console::Error->WriteLine(
                S"\nFIBERS.DLL: main Caught {0}", x);
        }
        Dispose();
    }
};

void fibermain(void* objptr) {
    //System::Console::WriteLine(   S"\nfibermain()");
    System::IntPtr ptr = (System::IntPtr) objptr;
    GCHandle g = GCHandle::op_Explicit(ptr);
    Fiber *fiber = static_cast<Fiber*>(g.Target);
    g.Free();
    fiber->main();
    System::Console::WriteLine( S"\nfibermain returning");
}

#pragma unmanaged

VOID CALLBACK unmanaged_fiberproc(PVOID objptr) {
#if defined(CORHOST)
    corhost->CreateLogicalThreadState();
#endif
    fibermain(objptr);
#if defined(CORHOST)
    corhost->DeleteLogicalThreadState();
#endif
}

}

The above fibers.cpp class file is the only class in the Visaul c++ project. It's built as a DLL with CLR support using /CLR:oldstyle switch.

using System;
using System.Threading;
using Fibers;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace TickZoom.Utilities
{
    public class FiberTask : Fiber 
    {
        public FiberTask()
        {

        }
        public FiberTask(FiberTask mainTask)
            : base(mainTask)
        {

        }

        protected override void Run()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Top of worker loop.");
                try
                {
                    Work();
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Exception: " + ex.Message);
                }
                Console.WriteLine("After the exception.");
                Work();
            }
        }

        private void Work()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Doing work on fiber: " + GetHashCode() + ", thread id: " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            ++counter;
            Console.WriteLine("Incremented counter " + counter);
            if (counter == 2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Throwing an exception.");
                throw new InvalidCastException("Just a test exception.");
            }
            Yield();
        }

        public static int counter;
    }

    [TestFixture]
    public class TestingFibers
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestIdeas()
        {
            var fiberTasks = new System.Collections.Generic.List<FiberTask>();
            var mainFiber = new FiberTask();
            for( var i=0; i< 5; i++)
            {
                fiberTasks.Add(new FiberTask(mainFiber));
            }
            for (var i = 0; i < fiberTasks.Count; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Resuming " + i);
                var fiberTask = fiberTasks[i];
                if( !fiberTask.Resume())
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Fiber " + i + " was disposed.");
                    fiberTasks.RemoveAt(i);
                    i--;
                }
            }
            for (var i = 0; i < fiberTasks.Count; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Disposing " + i);
                fiberTasks[i].Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
}

The above unit test gives the following output and then crashes badly:

Resuming 0
Top of worker loop.
Doing work on fiber: 476184704, thread id: 7
Incremented counter 1
Resuming 1
Top of worker loop.
Doing work on fiber: 453842656, thread id: 7
Incremented counter 2
Throwing an exception.
Exception: Just a test exception.
After the exception.
7
  • 1
    And what C# / Fx version are you using? The original was already considered flaky for Fx2 Dec 31 '11 at 13:38
  • This is C# 3.5. So is it hopeless? We're desperate to figure out how to store and resume thread state for high performance scheduling. I've got this other question which is more general and explains the background of why we need this capability. Any other ideas for solutions are most welcome! stackoverflow.com/questions/8685806/…
    – Wayne
    Dec 31 '11 at 13:42
  • 3
    A related SO thread with alternatives: Is there a fiber api in .net? Dec 31 '11 at 13:44
  • Yes, mine is based on actually trying the sample code referred to in the 2003 MSDM article on current 3.5 C# framework. It seems it won't work. Our only other option will be to convert Mono which does, in fact, support continuations. But we wanted to stay on .Net, if possible.
    – Wayne
    Dec 31 '11 at 14:09
  • Perhaps relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/1881473/… Jan 3 '12 at 17:07
2

A time ago, I experienced the same problem - I tried to use the code snippet in .NET 3.5 (later on 4.0) and it crashed. This convinced me to turn away from the "hacky" solution. The truth is that .NET is missing a generic co-routine concept. There are some guys which simulate co-routines by enumerators and the yield keyword (see http://fxcritic.blogspot.com/2008/05/lightweight-fibercoroutines.html). However, this has clear disadvantages to me: It is not as intuitive to use as good-old Win32 fibers and it requires you to use IEnumerable as return type for each co-routine.

Maybe this arcticle: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/gg316360 is interesting for you. Microsoft is about to introduce a new async keyword. A community technology preview (CTP) is offered for download. I guess it should be possible to develop a clean co-routine implementation on top of those async extensions.

2
  • Well, thanks but another factor has come to play. We also need the ability to have all this work across AppDomains so that plugins can be unloaded/loaded dynamically. So it seems there is a Coop Fiber sample code for .Net 2.0 SDK to build your own custom C++ Host of the CLR and provider your own thread pool with fibers. We plan to research and test doing that in the near future.
    – Wayne
    Jan 6 '12 at 0:46
  • Scratch my last comment. Duh! 2.0 is too old to deal with now. What was I thinking? Coop fiber even in the host isn't supported anymore. Maybe async is the only way...but does it cause context switching? Will have to test it.
    – Wayne
    Jan 6 '12 at 14:21
0

You can use Delphi coroutines framework https://github.com/Purik/AIO It has completed Fibers implementation.

For example, you can wrap anonymous procedure to Fiber- procedure will be runned in Fiber context, you can access and detect any exception raised in Fiber

0

When using fibers you must store the exception management stack state on a local variable (on the stack) before you switch to your main fiber. The first operation right after the switch (when execution comes back) is restoring the exception stack from your backup in a local variable. Take a look at this blog entry on how to use fibers with Delphi without breaking exception handling: http://jsbattig.blogspot.com/2015/03/how-to-properly-support-windows-fibers.html

The point is, if you want to use Fibers AND write exception handlers AND switch fibers inside and try finally or try-catch block, you will have to figure out how to do this with CLR.

I'm playing around with Fibers in C# and I could not find the way yet. If there were a way to do it, I imagine it will be a hack at the end of the day.

0

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