6

This is essentially what I want to do:

public abstract class Uniform<T>
{
    public readonly int Location;
    private T _variable;

    public virtual T Variable
    {
        get { return _variable; }
    }
}

public class UniformMatrix4 : Uniform<Matrix4>
{
    public override Matrix4 Variable
    {
        set
        {
            _variable = value;
            GL.UniformMatrix4(Location, false, ref _variable);
        }
    }
}

The getter for Variable will be the same across all derived classes, but the setter needs to be different.

In fact... I'd prefer not to have derived classes at all (it's only one function call that will differ for each type) but I can't think of how else to do it.


Edit: If it wasn't clear what the problem I'm having is, I'm getting a syntax error:

'UniformMatrix4.Variable.set': cannot override because 'Uniform.Variable' does not have an overridable set accessor

And I'm not sure how to create an "overridable set accessor"... virtual and abstract don't seem to be allowed on the setter.

  • 1
    Regarding your edit: that's why I gave the answer that I gave. I have puzzled over this problem before. – Mike Nakis Dec 31 '11 at 22:41
10

It's not possible to do this in C#, but as a workaround you could do this. It would involve calling an abstract setter function which could be overridden by derived classes, while leaving the standard get intact. Would this work?

public abstract class Uniform<T>
{
    public readonly int Location;
    protected T _variable;

    public T Variable
    {
        get { return _variable; }
        set { SetVariable(value); } 
    }

    protected abstract void SetVariable(T value);
}

public class UniformMatrix4 : Uniform<Matrix4>
{
    public override void SetVariable(Matrix4x4 value)
    {
        _variable = value;
        GL.UniformMatrix4(Location, false, ref _variable);
    }
}
  • Yes, this would work. At the expense of an additional virtual function call. – Mike Nakis Dec 31 '11 at 22:43
  • Interesting solution! And that would force the derived classes to implement the setter. Not quite as clean, but it's safer. I like it! – mpen Dec 31 '11 at 22:43
  • If you're doing this, Variable doesn't need to be virtual anymore. – Gabe Dec 31 '11 at 23:00
  • Yes Mike you're right, it would incur an extra virtual function call. This could be mitigated by using sealed on the overidden SetVariable function. I've also removed virtual from the property so thanks for the comment Gabe. – Dr. ABT Dec 31 '11 at 23:14
  • Wh00ps, sorry: yes, it is true that Variable does not have to be virtual anymore. So, only one virtual method call, so, same performance as my solution. And better. +1. – Mike Nakis Dec 31 '11 at 23:25
6

You will need to do this:

public abstract class Uniform<T>
{
    public readonly int Location;

    public virtual T Variable
    {
        get; set;
    }
}

public class UniformMatrix4 : Uniform<Matrix4>
{
    public override Matrix4 Variable
    {
        get
        {
            return base.Variable;
        }
        set
        {
            base.Variable = value;
            GL.UniformMatrix4(Location, false, ref value);
        }
    }
}

As I understand, the behaviour will be the expected.

Hope it helps.

  • 1
    _variable should be value as you've removed my backing member, but close enough! Didn't think I could do this without one. – mpen Dec 31 '11 at 22:42
  • I fixed that. Thanks! – Ivo Jan 1 '12 at 0:20
2

It is not possible to do this in C#. You have to add a setter to the base class, and make it throw an "Invalid Operation" exception.

  • I think NotImplementedException makes more sense, but it seems to be working now :D – mpen Dec 31 '11 at 22:39
  • Actually, you might be right about the exception; for example, that's what the ReadOnlyCollection<T> class throws if you attempt to modify it. – Mike Nakis Dec 31 '11 at 22:47

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