4

Host is Linux. I have multiple files in the same directory. All of the *.pl files contain the following at the beginning differing only in comments:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

BEGIN { chdir('/home/httpd/vhosts/mysite.com/httpdocs/newsbot'); unshift(@INC, "/home/httpd/vhosts/mysite.com/httpdocs/newsbot"); }

use Form;
use File;
use Mysite;

#Read in All Form Variables
&ReadInForm;

The file Form.pm contains the ReadInForm subroutine and nothing else.

sub ReadInForm { 
}    
1;

The weird thing is that the output of the above is completely inconsistent. Sometimes it executes fine, but shows the "Internal Server Error" message at the end of the script and puts the following in the error_log file:

Argument "" isn't numeric in subroutine entry at /usr/lib64/perl5/vendor_perl/5.8.8/x86_64-linux-thread-multi/ModPerl/RegistryCooker.pm line 171.\n, referer: http://www.mysite.com/newsbot/groupkeywords.pl

Other times, it doesn't execute, and outputs the following to the browser:

Undefined subroutine &ModPerl::ROOT::ModPerl::Registry::home_httpd_vhosts_mysite_2ecom_httpdocs_newsbot_groupkeywords_2epl::ReadInForm called at /home/httpd/vhosts/mysite.com/httpdocs/newsbot/groupkeywords.pl line 11.

Other times it works correctly with no error.

The strange thing is that it is inconsistent. I can get one output from a file, refresh a few minutes later and then get the other one. I've even got a few "Internal Server Error" messages and a 500 response header as well with no actual content. Commenting out the line &ReadInForm; solves the problem every time, so I have narrowed it down to that, however it doesn't matter what I put in Form.pm. I can even put an empty subroutine (as I have above) and it still doesn't solve the problem.

I am not even sure how to debug this. How is it even possible for it to be inconsistent? Does the perl compiler do some sort of behind the scenes caching?

  • Assuming you're using prefork, try setting "MaxClients 1" so you only have a single httpd child process. Restart apache, and try again. That way, all your requests will hit the same process, and it should be easier to debug. – Corey Henderson Jan 2 '12 at 7:07
  • Corey, Unfortunately it's shared hosting and I do not have root access. I may be able to get ahold of them later today to see if they can do this for me, but they are offline right now. – Mike Jan 2 '12 at 7:16
  • I don't think they'll be doing that on shared hosting. – Corey Henderson Jan 2 '12 at 8:05
5

Obviously your host is using Apache mod_perl. You must code explicitly for mod_perl. By the way your code smells of perl 4 and cgi-lib.pl, 1996 vintage. Simply put, under mod_perl your script can't work, because global variables are completely forbidden and you can't modify @INC under mod_perl anyway. You'd better put "use strict; use warnings;" in your script, and use proper CGI or mod_perl form parsing modules and functions.

However, this style of code should work:

#!/usr/bin/perl

# I don't know what this BEGIN block is for, but I suspect it may not work or causes subtle bugs...
BEGIN { chdir('/home/httpd/vhosts/mysite.com/httpdocs/newsbot'); }


use strict;
use warnings;
use Form;
use File;
use Mysite;

#Read in All Form Variables
Form::ReadInForm();

With this in Form.pm:

use strict;
use warnings;

package Form;

sub ReadInForm { 
}    
1;

Edit: if your code is old and you want to save you a major overhaul, you could create a "main" sub containing all of the script code and the variable declarations, and simply call it this way:

Old script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

# the following line will fail with "undeclared variable" under "use strict"
$a="test";
print "$a\n";

New script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; 
use warnings;

# call the main loop enclosing everything else    
main();

sub main {
    # first declare all variables
    my $a;

    # then add there all the code:
    $a="test";
    print "$a\n";
}

This way the script could be "modernized" cheaply and really quick.

  • 1
    I am not sure what type of Perl it is. I didn't write the code myself. My strong point is PHP and I know little to nothing of Perl. Fortunately your advice seems to have fixed the errors I was receiving Unfortunately, the code is so old or poorly written that when I include the use strict; use warnings; lines, I get over 3000 characters of errors and warnings in the log file. I'm thinking that perhaps a complete rewrite in another language I'm more familiar with may be in order. – Mike Jan 2 '12 at 20:35
  • 3
    Even though this doesn't directly address the inconsistency issues, I'm still going to accept your answer since it did get rid of the errors I was receiving. – Mike Jan 2 '12 at 20:36
  • using "use strict", you need to declare explicitly all variables. It may be straightforward or not, depending upon the code base. The main risk is that your scripts may use lots of global variables, in which case you can add a "main" function to host the main loop and variables and make them non global. I'm editing my answer to illustrate the point... – wazoox Jan 3 '12 at 17:23
0

At this later date in 2017 I have one thing to add to this thread based on my recent similar experiences. It is obvious to me that old 1990's legacy perl code should experience weird errors, when run under mod_perl, as is clearly and tersely explained in (http://www.fifi.org/cgi-bin/man2html/usr/share/man/man3/mod_perl_traps.3pm.gz). It is also obvious from other documentation that mod_perl was created to speed up perl server code as much as 35x due to thread reuse, but certain old perl CGI practices must be avoided to make this work cleanly.

Which is theoretically GREAT! But not always...

My one caveat suggestion is this to the perl_mod guru community of enthusiasts out there. When deciding how to run legacy perl, do not automatically suggest using mod_perl, and thus force an ensuing slew of unexpected code changes on the unsuspecting legacy perl code porting person.

Instead first determine whether the legacy code needs to run with maximum efficiency (under a heavy-use reusable thread environment), or whether old-fashioned single thread CGI is just fine.

Like in my case. I wrote a great little CGI perl on-line ordering system in 1998. One of the first of its kind. Now (in 2017) I wanted to deploy it simply to demonstrate some old code I had written (like a resume item). It will never be run except as a demo.

So, mod_perl is OVERKILL, but the SysAdmins at my new hosting site insisted I install mod_perl, which I gather was their advised common habit, but it became subsequently clear to me they did not really know anything about what mod_perl does to an old CGI perl system. But neither did I at the time. So, I did as they asked, and then only later learned of the mod_perl pitfalls, as I fell into them one-by-one.

If I simply hadn't loaded mod_perl, none of those errors would have happened, since the default configuration of the server was old fashioned CGI.

Caveat Emptor.

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