135

I need to write a loop that does something like:

if i (1..10)
  do thing 1
elsif i (11..20)
  do thing 2
elsif i (21..30)
  do thing 3
etc...

But so far have gone down the wrong paths in terms of syntax.

309
if i.between?(1, 10)
  do thing 1 
elsif i.between?(11,20)
  do thing 2 
...
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This also works for Date and DateTime objects while === does not. – Aditya Jun 4 '12 at 2:23
  • i.between?(1..10) won't work (if it is ..) I suppose there must be a reason for it – nonopolarity Dec 11 '15 at 23:46
  • between? would need two parameters it would not allow range. – Manish Nagdewani Nov 16 '16 at 13:12
  • 5
    is it inclusive or exclusive? – andrewcockerham Aug 29 '17 at 12:01
  • 1
    @andrewcockerham Inclusive. 3.between?(1, 3) => true – Tyler James Young Aug 1 '18 at 22:53
85

Use the === operator (or its synonym include?)

if (1..10) === i
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  • 1
    Has the nice benefit of also working with i being something else than a number (like nil) – Christoffer Klang Jul 24 '12 at 9:45
  • 4
    Wouldn't seem like a very efficient solution if the range had been significantly large. – rthbound Nov 25 '13 at 6:49
  • 6
    For future reader, the alternative way if i === (1..10) won't work – Anwar May 24 '15 at 11:13
  • @rthbound, why? (1..10000000000000000) isn't an array. (1..10000000000000000) === 5000000000000000 is just doing a "between" test under the hood – John La Rooy Jan 17 '16 at 23:29
  • 1
    @Anwar could you explain why it doesn't work the other way? – Govind Rai Feb 19 '17 at 1:14
70

As @Baldu said, use the === operator or use case/when which internally uses === :

case i
when 1..10
  # do thing 1
when 11..20
  # do thing 2
when 21..30
  # do thing 3
etc...
| improve this answer | |
  • of all the answers, this is also likely the most performant when you have multiple ranges. – xentek Jun 9 '13 at 3:21
40

if you still wanted to use ranges...

def foo(x)
 if (1..10).include?(x)
   puts "1 to 10"
 elsif (11..20).include?(x)
   puts "11 to 20"
 end
end
| improve this answer | |
8

You can usually get a lot better performance with something like:

if i >= 21
  # do thing 3
elsif i >= 11
  # do thing 2
elsif i >= 1
  # do thing 1
| improve this answer | |
8

You could use
if (1..10).cover? i then thing_1 elsif (11..20).cover? i then thing_2

and according to this benchmark in Fast Ruby is faster than include?

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  • This is actually a lot faster – Joe Half Face Aug 29 '17 at 9:34
5

Not a direct answer to the question, but if you want the opposite to "within":

(2..5).exclude?(7)

true

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1

A more dynamic answer, which can be built in Ruby:

def select_f_from(collection, point) 
  collection.each do |cutoff, f|
    if point <= cutoff
      return f
    end
  end
  return nil
end

def foo(x)
  collection = [ [ 0, nil ],
                 [ 10, lambda { puts "doing thing 1"} ],
                 [ 20, lambda { puts "doing thing 2"} ],
                 [ 30, lambda { puts "doing thing 3"} ],
                 [ 40, nil ] ]

  f = select_f_from(collection, x)
  f.call if f
end

So, in this case, the "ranges" are really just fenced in with nils in order to catch the boundary conditions.

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-2

For Strings:

(["GRACE", "WEEKLY", "DAILY5"]).include?("GRACE")

#=>true

| improve this answer | |

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