92

I got the above error in my app. Here is the original code

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
     string accountNumber = 
          (string)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidmyApp, 
                          CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                          "GetCustomerNumber", 
                          new SqlParameter("@id", id));
     return accountNumber.ToString();
 }

I replaced with

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
   object accountNumber =  
          (object)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidCRM, 
                                CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                                "spx_GetCustomerNumber", 
                                new SqlParameter("@id", id));
    if (accountNumber is System.DBNull)
    {
       return string.Empty;
    }
    else
    {
       return accountNumber.ToString();
    }
}

Is there a better way around this?

  • 2
    you should really look into @rein's answer, will save you lots of time in the long run – roman m Jun 19 '09 at 23:35

11 Answers 11

76

A shorter form can be used:

return (accountNumber == DBNull.Value) ? string.Empty : accountNumber.ToString()

EDIT: Haven't paid attention to ExecuteScalar. It does really return null if the field is absent in the return result. So use instead:

return (accountNumber == null) ? string.Empty : accountNumber.ToString() 
  • 3
    That won't work - the "accountNumber" is not a database value but a regular old Plain Old .NET "object" instance - you need to check against normal "null" value. The DBNull.Value would work for a SqlDataReader or a SqlParameter - but not for this object here. – marc_s May 15 '09 at 20:27
  • You're right, I started to optimize the condition check part, haven't looked at the line before. Mea culpa. – User May 15 '09 at 20:28
  • There is typo in your post that I can't really edit because the edit requires 6 characters to be changed. Can someone change accountNumber.TosString() to accountNumber.ToString() – Eric Jul 30 '13 at 11:31
  • @marc_s Depending on db/query layout, you need to check against either of them or even both. If the WHERE does not match any row, you'll get a null, if the selected row has NULL in that column, the return value is System.DBNull. – Alexander May 27 '14 at 7:52
  • In the first case @Alexander mentions -not matching any row- you can rely on Convert.ToString or any other Convert method if you are fine with the value they return when converting from null: empty string for strings, 0 for numeric values, false for boolean, MinValue for DateTime... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… – Jaime Oct 7 '14 at 14:30
180
+50

With a simple generic function you can make this very easy. Just do this:

return ConvertFromDBVal<string>(accountNumber);

using the function:

public static T ConvertFromDBVal<T>(object obj)
{
    if (obj == null || obj == DBNull.Value)
    {
        return default(T); // returns the default value for the type
    }
    else
    {
        return (T)obj;
    }
}
  • Yes, a function like this is the only practical solution. Any kind of in-line logic will fail after you have copied and pasted it a thousand times. :-) – Christian Hayter Jul 2 '09 at 15:49
  • 3
    this will not work if you try converting 1 to bool (Convert.ToBoolean(1) works fine tho) – roman m Oct 17 '09 at 20:32
  • @roman: so then we would want to have an additional check (prior to checking for null) that checks for a boolean type... – IAbstract Aug 27 '10 at 14:37
  • 1
    If you want or need to use Convert functions, then this is not working. There are several scenarios where you might prefer convert to an explicit cast. @romanm noted one of them. Another one is when you work with decimals and care about the different rounding mechanisms that Convert.ToInt32 and (int) use. The former rounds to the nearest even value, while the explicit cast just truncates the value: stackoverflow.com/questions/1608801/… If possible, I would eliminate NULLs from the mix, using T-SQL ISNULL function – Jaime Oct 7 '14 at 14:26
  • 2
    @Jaime This function is supposed to act like an implicit cast from a SQL data type to a C#/.NET data type. If you have needs for an explicit cast, don't use this function - do it explicitly instead. – rein Oct 7 '14 at 22:44
15

ExecuteScalar will return

  • null if there is no result set
  • otherwise the first column of the first row of the resultset, which may be DBNull.

If you know that the first column of the resultset is a string, then to cover all bases you need to check for both null and DBNull. Something like:

object accountNumber = ...ExecuteScalar(...);
return (accountNumber == null) ? String.Empty : accountNumber.ToString();

The above code relies on the fact that DBNull.ToString returns an empty string.

If accountNumber was another type (say integer), then you'd need to be more explicit:

object accountNumber = ...ExecuteScalar(...);
return (accountNumber == null || Convert.IsDBNull(accountNumber) ?     
         (int) accountNumber : 0;

If you know for sure that your resultset will always have at least one row (e.g. SELECT COUNT(*)...), then you can skip the check for null.

In your case the error message "Unable to cast object of type ‘System.DBNull’ to type ‘System.String`" indicates that the first column of your result set is a DBNUll value. This is from the cast to string on the first line:

string accountNumber = (string) ... ExecuteScalar(...);

Marc_s's comment that you don't need to check for DBNull.Value is wrong.

  • my resultset will not always return a row. – Saif Khan May 15 '09 at 21:26
6

You can use C#'s null coalescing operator

return accountNumber ?? string.Empty;
  • -1: That won't compile: the method returns a string and accountNumber is an object. – Joe May 15 '09 at 20:58
  • 2
    return Cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString() ?? String.Empty; – Chaitanya Jan 19 '10 at 6:34
  • return Cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString() did the job for me – Taran Jun 1 '17 at 20:16
3

There is another way to workaround this issue. How about modify your store procedure? by using ISNULL(your field, "") sql function , you can return empty string if the return value is null.

Then you have your clean code as original version.

3

This is the generic method that I use to convert any object that might be a DBNull.Value:

public static T ConvertDBNull<T>(object value, Func<object, T> conversionFunction)
{
    return conversionFunction(value == DBNull.Value ? null : value);
}

usage:

var result = command.ExecuteScalar();

return result.ConvertDBNull(Convert.ToInt32);

shorter:

return command
    .ExecuteScalar()
    .ConvertDBNull(Convert.ToInt32);
2

I suppose you can do it like this:

string accountNumber = DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(...) as string;

If accountNumber is null it means it was DBNull not string :)

  • Or return (accountNumber as string) ?? string.Empty; , with accountNumber still being an object. If you prefer to keep your database call on its own line. – Brian Aug 30 '10 at 18:10
1

String.Concat transforms DBNull and null values to an empty string.

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
   object accountNumber =  
          (object)DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(connectionStringSplendidCRM, 
                                CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
                                "spx_GetCustomerNumber", 
                                new SqlParameter("@id", id));

    return String.Concat(accountNumber);

 }

However, I think you lose something on code understandability

  • What happens if you write return "" + accountNumber;? – Zev Spitz Jul 6 '14 at 12:13
0

Since I got an instance which isn't null and if I compared to DBNULL I got Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'string' and 'system.dbnull' exeption, and if I tried to change to compare to NULL, it simply didn't work ( since DBNull is an object) even that's the accepted answer.

I decided to simply use the 'is' keyword. So the result is very readable:

data = (item is DBNull) ? String.Empty : item

-1

I use an extension to eliminate this problem for me, which may or may not be what you are after.

It goes like this:

public static class Extensions
{

    public String TrimString(this object item)
    {
        return String.Format("{0}", item).Trim();
    }

}

Note:

This extension does not return null values! If the item is null or DBNull.Value, it will return an empty String.

Usage:

public string GetCustomerNumber(Guid id)
{
    var obj = 
        DBSqlHelperFactory.ExecuteScalar(
            connectionStringSplendidmyApp, 
            CommandType.StoredProcedure, 
            "GetCustomerNumber", 
            new SqlParameter("@id", id)
        );
    return obj.TrimString();
}
-2

Convert it Like

string s = System.DBNull.value.ToString();

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