I need a script/tool which reads a binary file and outputs a C/C++ source code array (which represents the file content). Are there any?


(This question was deleted earlier. I put this question back in because it is valuable. I was searching for exactly this on Google and didn't found anything. Of course it is trivial to code myself but I would have saved some minutes if I would have found such a simple script. Thus it is valuable.

This questions also had a lot of down-votes without much explanation. Please comment before you down-vote why you think this is of no value or of bad value.

This question also caused a lot of confusion about what I am asking about. If something is unclear, please ask. I don't really know how to make it more clear. See the answers for examples.

Also (after putting the question here), I already have several answers. I just want to put/link them here (again) because I think it might be useful for someone else searching for this.)

  • 2
    Probably people understood that you wanted some kind of decompiler or stuff like that. You may rephrase it as "reads a binary file and outputs a C/C++ declaration of an array initialized to the content of the file" or something like that. – Matteo Italia Jan 3 '12 at 2:10
up vote 96 down vote accepted

On Debian and other Linux distros is installed by default (along with vim) the xxd tool, which, given the -i option, can do what you want:

matteo@teodeb:~/Desktop$ echo Hello World\! > temp
matteo@teodeb:~/Desktop$ xxd -i temp 
unsigned char temp[] = {
  0x48, 0x65, 0x6c, 0x6c, 0x6f, 0x20, 0x57, 0x6f, 0x72, 0x6c, 0x64, 0x21,
  0x0a
};
unsigned int temp_len = 13;
  • 5
    Ah nice! It's even available in MacOSX. – Albert Jan 3 '12 at 5:02
  • Just what I was looking for :) thanks! – João Fernandes Apr 16 '13 at 12:14
  • 2
    had zero trouble integrating xxd into a Visual Studio 2013 solution on Windows. I used this source – Spike0xff Dec 3 '15 at 15:23
  • 2
    The only problem could be, that this array is not const (as well as the length). This may make a difference on microcontrollers (RAM vs ROM). You may need to edit the generated files. – Tomasz Gandor Jun 21 '16 at 13:32
  • 2
    @MatteoItalia - I agree. I have it wrapped, so that is pipes the output through | sed 's/unsigned/const unsigned/', and it could say anything else you need in this line. (I put the result into a separate file - to be easily overwritten). – Tomasz Gandor Jun 22 '16 at 11:51

One simple tool can be found here:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    assert(argc == 2);
    char* fn = argv[1];
    FILE* f = fopen(fn, "rb");
    printf("char a[] = {\n");
    unsigned long n = 0;
    while(!feof(f)) {
        unsigned char c;
        if(fread(&c, 1, 1, f) == 0) break;
        printf("0x%.2X,", (int)c);
        ++n;
        if(n % 10 == 0) printf("\n");
    }
    fclose(f);
    printf("};\n");
}
  • You will have extra "," at the end of your char array before "}" – rkosegi Jan 4 '13 at 14:30
  • 1
    That is not a problem, it compiles in C++. – sashoalm Aug 28 '13 at 8:08

This tool compiles in the developer command prompt in C. It produces output to the terminal displaying the contents in the "array_name.c" file that is created. Note that some terminals may display the "\b" character.

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <assert.h>

    int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    assert(argc == 2);
    char* fn = argv[1];

    // Open file passed by reference
    FILE* f = fopen(fn, "rb");
    // Opens a new file in the programs location
    FILE* fw = fopen("array_name.c","w");

    // Next two lines write the strings to the console and .c file
    printf("char array_name[] = {\n");
    fprintf(fw,"char hex_array[] = {\n");

    // Declare long integer for number of columns in the array being made
    unsigned long n = 0;

    // Loop until end of file
    while((!feof(f))){
        // Declare character that stores the bytes from hex file
        unsigned char c;

        // Ignore failed elements read
        if(fread(&c, 1, 1, f) == 0) break;
        // Prints to console and file, "0x%.2X" ensures format for all
        // read bytes is like "0x00"
        printf("0x%.2X,", (int)c);
        fprintf(fw,"0x%.2X,", (int)c);

        // Increment counter, if 20 columns have been made, begin new line
        ++n;
        if(n % 20 == 0){
            printf("\n");
            fprintf(fw,"\n");
        }
    }

    // fseek places cursor to overwrite extra "," made from previous loop
    // this is for the new .c file. Since "\b" is technically a character
    // to remove the extra "," requires overwriting it.
    fseek(fw, -1, SEEK_CUR);

    // "\b" moves cursor back one in the terminal
    printf("\b};\n");
    fprintf(fw,"};\n");
    fclose(f);
    fclose(fw);
}

This is a binary file to C array generator python source code which is identical program in Albert's answer.

import sys
from functools import partial

if len(sys.argv) < 2:
  sys.exit('Usage: %s file' % sys.argv[0])
print("char a[] = {")
n = 0
with open(sys.argv[1], "rb") as in_file:
  for c in iter(partial(in_file.read, 1), b''):
    print("0x%02X," % ord(c), end='')
    n += 1
    if n % 16 == 0:
      print("")
print("};")

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