2

I'm trying to reach peak performance of each SM from the code below. The peak lies somewhere between 25 GFlops(GTX275-GT200 Arch.). This code gives 8 GFlops at the max.

__global__ void new_ker(float *x)
{
  int index = threadIdx.x+blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
  float a,b;
  a=0;
  b=x[index];
  //LOOP=10000000
  //No. of blocks = 1
  //Threads per block = 512 (I'm using GTX 275 - GT200 Arch.)
  #pragma unroll 2048
  for(int i=0;i<LOOP;i++){
       a=a*b+b;
  }  

  x[index] = a;

 }

I don't want to increase ILP in the code. Any ideas why it's not reaching peak??

int main(int argc,char **argv)
{

   //Initializations
   float *x;
   float *dx;
   cudaEvent_t new_start,new_stop;
   float elapsed;
   double gflops;
   x = 0;
   flag = 0;
   cudaMalloc((void **)&dx,sizeof(float)*THPB);

   //ILP=1  
   cudaEventCreate(&new_start);
   cudaEventCreate(&new_stop);
   printf("Kernel1:\n");
   cudaEventRecord(new_start, 0);
   new_ker<<<BLOCKS,THPB>>>(dx);
   cudaEventRecord(new_stop,0);
   cudaEventSynchronize(new_stop);
   cudaEventElapsedTime(&elapsed,new_start,new_stop);
   x = (float *)malloc(sizeof(float)*THPB);
   cudaMemcpy(x,dx,sizeof(float)*THPB,cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

   gflops = ((double)(BLOCKS)*(THPB)*LOOP/elapsed)/1000000;
   printf("\t%f",gflops);
   cudaEventDestroy(new_start);
   cudaEventDestroy(new_stop);
   return 0;
}

Platform: CUDA 3.0 NVIDIA GeForce GTX275 (GT200)

8
  • If you are using 1 block per SM, it probably isn't enough to cover all the latency in the architecture. Try launching the maximum number of blocks per MP the code allows and see what happens.
    – talonmies
    Jan 3, 2012 at 8:57
  • 1
    Actually, I'm doing Vasily Volkov's experiments and he has reached peak using only one block.
    – captain
    Jan 3, 2012 at 9:11
  • But he did it with high register consumption and a lot of ILP. Your code doesn't have any ILP.
    – talonmies
    Jan 3, 2012 at 9:14
  • Yes he does reach the peak with ILP. But in his first experiment he tries to increase only TLP and he reaches peak when the number of threads equals 192 on G80 that is(latency hiding). Ref: Better Performance at lower occupancy(slide)
    – captain
    Jan 3, 2012 at 9:18
  • Well, then the other possibility is that your measurements are not correct. Can you edit the question to describe how you are launching the kernel, timing the code and calculating the flop count, and what platform you are running this on?
    – talonmies
    Jan 3, 2012 at 10:12

1 Answer 1

4

If I put together a complete repro case from your code, using the correct FLOP calculation:

#include <stdio.h> 

#define LOOP (10000000)
#define BLOCKS (30)
#define THPB (512)

__global__ void new_ker(float *x)
{
  int index = threadIdx.x+blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
  float a,b;
  a=0;
  b=x[index];
  #pragma unroll 2048
  for(int i=0;i<LOOP;i++){
       a=a*b+b;
  }  

  x[index] = a;
}

int main(int argc,char **argv)
{

   //Initializations
   float *x;
   float *dx;
   cudaEvent_t new_start,new_stop;
   float elapsed;
   double gflops;
   x = 0;
   cudaMalloc((void **)&dx,sizeof(float)*THPB);

   //ILP=1  
   cudaEventCreate(&new_start);
   cudaEventCreate(&new_stop);
   printf("Kernel1:\n");
   cudaEventRecord(new_start, 0);
   new_ker<<<BLOCKS,THPB>>>(dx);
   cudaEventRecord(new_stop,0);
   cudaEventSynchronize(new_stop);
   cudaEventElapsedTime(&elapsed,new_start,new_stop);
   x = (float *)malloc(sizeof(float)*THPB*BLOCKS);
   cudaMemcpy(x,dx,sizeof(float)*THPB*BLOCKS,cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

   gflops = 2.0e-6 * ((double)(LOOP)*double(THPB*BLOCKS)/(double)elapsed);
   printf("\t%f\n",gflops);
   cudaEventDestroy(new_start);
   cudaEventDestroy(new_stop);
   return 0;
}

And I compile it and run it on a 1.4GHz GTX275 with CUDA 3.2 on a 64 bit linux platform:

$ nvcc -arch=sm_13 -Xptxas="-v" -o perf perf.cu
ptxas info    : Compiling entry function '_Z7new_kerPf' for 'sm_13'
ptxas info    : Used 4 registers, 8+16 bytes smem, 8 bytes cmem[1]
$ ./perf 
Kernel1:
        671.806039

I get within 0.01% of peak FLOP/s for that card running a pure FMAD code (1.4 GHz * 2 FLOP * 8 cores/MP * 30 MP) = 672 GFLOP/s.

So it seems that the code does, in fact, hit peak FLOP/s with one block per multiprocessor, but you just are not calculating the FLOP/s number correctly.

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