19

I'm looking for a way of generating an alphabetic sequence:

A, B, C, ..., Z, AA, AB, AC, ..., ZZ.

Can anyone suggest a convenient way of doing this. What data structures can I make use of?

I'd like methods which get the next code in the sequence and then reset the sequence.

16 Answers 16

7

My version implements Iterator and maintains an int counter. The counter values are translated to the corresponding string:

import com.google.common.collect.AbstractIterator;

class Sequence extends AbstractIterator<String> {
    private int now;
    private static char[] vs;
    static {
        vs = new char['Z' - 'A' + 1];
        for(char i='A'; i<='Z';i++) vs[i - 'A'] = i;
    }

    private StringBuilder alpha(int i){
        assert i > 0;
        char r = vs[--i % vs.length];
        int n = i / vs.length;
        return n == 0 ? new StringBuilder().append(r) : alpha(n).append(r);
    }

    @Override protected String computeNext() {
        return alpha(++now).toString();
    }
}

Call next() on the Iterator to use it.

Sequence sequence = new Sequence();
for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
  System.out.print(sequence.next() + " ");
}

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE

An implementation with better performance for larger sequences reuses the common prefix:

class SequencePrefix extends AbstractIterator<String> {
    private int now = -1;
    private String prefix = "";
    private static char[] vs;
    static {
        vs = new char['Z' - 'A' + 1];
        for(char i='A'; i<='Z';i++) vs[i - 'A'] = i;
    }

    private String fixPrefix(String prefix){
        if(prefix.length() == 0) return Character.toString(vs[0]);
        int last = prefix.length() - 1;
        char next = (char) (prefix.charAt(last) + 1);
        String sprefix = prefix.substring(0, last);
        return next - vs[0] == vs.length ? 
            fixPrefix(sprefix) + vs[0] : sprefix + next;
    }

    @Override protected String computeNext() {
        if(++now == vs.length) prefix = fixPrefix(prefix);
        now %= vs.length;
        return new StringBuilder().append(prefix).append(vs[now]).toString();
    }
}

You'll get even better performance if you rewrite this basic algorithm with an implementation that works with arrays. (String.charAt, String.substring and StringBuffer have some overhead.)

  • One can learn in different ways: hints or examples. Don't see how you followed your own advice. – Thomas Jung Jan 4 '12 at 12:15
  • The method I used in the end wasn't quite as clever as this. I simply populate an ArrayList with all of the possible codes when the object is instantiated then accessed the next code with an iterator. This is sufficient for my requirements. – mip Jan 4 '12 at 16:22
  • But your solutions is perfect then. If you do not need more and can't find a general purpose implementation, the simple implementation is the right one. Your implementation can have a much better performance - all values are cached. – Thomas Jung Jan 5 '12 at 6:57
  • Nice one! I've ported your solution to C#; Thanks :) – Rynkadink May 8 '14 at 9:21
26

I combined Wikipedia's Hexavigesimal#Bijective base-26 and Bijective numeration#Properties of bijective base-k numerals to make this:

import static java.lang.Math.*;

private static String getString(int n) {
    char[] buf = new char[(int) floor(log(25 * (n + 1)) / log(26))];
    for (int i = buf.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        n--;
        buf[i] = (char) ('A' + n % 26);
        n /= 26;
    }
    return new String(buf);
}

With the help of Wolfram Alpha. Maybe it would have been simpler to just use the implementation in the first link though.

  • It is missing from the Bijective numeration page on Wikipedia what is f is in the q_n=f(q_{n-1}/k) formula, making it non-informative. +you can do 'A' + --n % 26 shortening the code with one line, arguably at the expense of clarity. – Adam L. S. Dec 16 '16 at 22:50
  • On second thought, I believe it is a mapping function of the number to the digit, right? That would make it necessary to read the Hexavigesimal page as well either way. – Adam L. S. Dec 17 '16 at 0:36
  • The wikipedia article you reference (Bijective numeration#Properties of bijective base-k numerals) says: if k > 1, the number of digits in the k-adic numeral representing a nonnegative integer n is floor(log(n+1) + log(k-1)), where log is log base k. I have spent quite a while analyzing this problem and I can't quite convince myself that I see a proof of, nor even a good intuition justifying this assertion. It certainly works for all the cases I've tested, but I wonder if anyone has a good argument for this? I implemented both methods and found the recursive method was twice as slow. – Phill Apley Dec 29 '16 at 22:44
  • Here's a proof: math.stackexchange.com/questions/607856/… – Phill Apley Dec 30 '16 at 15:57
19

A one-line recursive function to generate the string from an integer:

static String str(int i) {
    return i < 0 ? "" : str((i / 26) - 1) + (char)(65 + i % 26);
}

Example usage:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 27*27; ++i) {
        System.out.println(i + " -> " + str(i));
    }
}

Output:

0 -> A
1 -> B
2 -> C
[...]
24 -> Y
25 -> Z
26 -> AA
27 -> AB
[...]
700 -> ZY
701 -> ZZ
702 -> AAA
703 -> AAB
[...]
727 -> AAZ
728 -> ABA
  • or return i-- <= 0 ? "" : (char) ('A' + i % 26) + str(i / 26); to start from 1. – Eng.Fouad Mar 21 '18 at 17:24
4
public class SeqGen {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //This is the configurable param
        int seqWidth = 3;

        Double charSetSize = 26d;

        // The size of the array will be 26 ^ seqWidth. ie: if 2 chars wide, 26
        // * 26. 3 chars, 26 * 26 * 26
        Double total = Math.pow(charSetSize, (new Integer(seqWidth)).doubleValue());

        StringBuilder[] sbArr = new StringBuilder[total.intValue()];
        // Initializing the Array
        for(int j = 0; j <total; j++){
            sbArr[j] = new StringBuilder();
        }

        char ch = 'A';
        // Iterating over the entire length for the 'char width' number of times.
        // TODO: Can these iterations be reduced?
        for(int k = seqWidth; k >0; k--){
            // Iterating and adding each char to the entire array.        
            for(int l = 1; l <=total; l++){
                sbArr[l-1].append(ch);
                if((l % (Math.pow(charSetSize, k-1d))) == 0){
                    ch++;
                    if(ch > 'Z'){
                        ch = 'A';
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        //Use the stringbuilder array.
        for (StringBuilder builder : sbArr) {
            System.out.println(builder.toString());
        }
    }
}

refer to the example and modify as per your requirements.

3

I have created an iterative and recursive solution below. You will find an example following these solutions that shows how to generate n-number of items in a sequence using an iterator. Also, I went code golfing with my recursive solution for fun.

Solutions

Iterative

public static String indexToColumnItr(int index, char[] alphabet) {
    if (index <= 0)
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("index must be a positive number");
    if (index <= alphabet.length)
        return Character.toString(alphabet[index - 1]);
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    while (index > 0) {
        sb.insert(0, alphabet[--index % alphabet.length]);
        index /= alphabet.length;
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

Recursive

public static String indexToColumnRec(int index, char[] alphabet) {
    if (index <= 0)
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("index must be a positive number");
    if (index <= alphabet.length)
        return Character.toString(alphabet[index - 1]);
    return indexToColumnRec(--index / alphabet.length, alphabet) + alphabet[index % alphabet.length];
}

Usage

public static final char[] ALPHABET = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".toCharArray();

indexToColumnItr(703, ALPHABET); // AAA

Example

The code below produced the following sequence of size 52:

[A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z, AA, AB, AC, AD, AE, AF, AG, AH, AI, AJ, AK, AL, AM, AN, AO, AP, AQ, AR, AS, AT, AU, AV, AW, AX, AY, AZ]

Main.java

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(AlphaUtils.generateSequence(52)));
    }
}

AlphaIterator.java

import java.util.Iterator;

public class AlphaIterator implements Iterator<String> {
    private int maxIndex;
    private int index;
    private char[] alphabet;

    public AlphaIterator() {
        this(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
    }

    public AlphaIterator(int maxIndex) {
        this(maxIndex, "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".toCharArray());
    }

    public AlphaIterator(char[] alphabet) {
        this(Integer.MAX_VALUE, alphabet);
    }

    public AlphaIterator(int maxIndex, char[] alphabet) {
        this.maxIndex = maxIndex;
        this.alphabet = alphabet;
        this.index = 1;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        return this.index < this.maxIndex;
    }

    @Override
    public String next() {
        return AlphaUtils.indexToColumnItr(this.index++, this.alphabet);
    }
}

AlphaUtils.java

public class AlphaUtils {
    // Iterative
    public static String indexToColumnItr(int index, char[] alphabet) {
        if (index <= 0) throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("index must be a positive number");
        if (index <= alphabet.length) return Character.toString(alphabet[index - 1]);
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        while (index > 0) {
            sb.insert(0, alphabet[--index % alphabet.length]);
            index /= alphabet.length;
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }

    // Recursive
    public static String indexToColumnRec(int index, char[] alphabet) {
        if (index <= 0) throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("index must be a positive number");
        if (index <= alphabet.length) return Character.toString(alphabet[index - 1]);
        return indexToColumnRec(--index / alphabet.length, alphabet) + alphabet[index % alphabet.length];
    }

    public static String[] generateSequence(int size) {
        String[] sequence = new String[size];
        int i = 0;
        for (AlphaIterator it = new AlphaIterator(size); it.hasNext();) {
            sequence[i++] = it.next();
        }
        return sequence;
    }
}

Code Golf (89 bytes) :-)

String f(int i,char[]a){int l=a.length;return i<=0?"?":i<=l?""+a[i-1]:f(--i/l,a)+a[i%l];}
2

I was testing but, the code is bad...

I made my code, that work until 256, but you can to change according to needs.

  public static String IntToLetter(int Int) {
    if (Int<27){
      return Character.toString((char)(Int+96));
    } else {
      if (Int%26==0) {
        return IntToLetter((Int/26)-1)+IntToLetter((Int%26)+1);
      } else {
        return IntToLetter(Int/26)+IntToLetter(Int%26);
      }
    }
  }

EDITED (method fixed):

  public static String IntToLetter(int Int) {
    if (Int<27){
      return Character.toString((char)(Int+96));
    } else {
      if (Int%26==0) {
        return IntToLetter((Int/26)-1)+IntToLetter(((Int-1)%26+1));
      } else {
        return IntToLetter(Int/26)+IntToLetter(Int%26);
      }
    }
  }

Testing my code:

  for (int i = 1;i<256;i++) {
    System.out.println("i="+i+" -> "+IntToLetter(i));
  }

The result

    i=1 -> a
    i=2 -> b
    i=3 -> c
    i=4 -> d
    i=5 -> e
    i=6 -> f
    i=7 -> g
    i=8 -> h
    i=9 -> i
    i=10 -> j
    i=11 -> k
    i=12 -> l
    i=13 -> m
    i=14 -> n
    i=15 -> o
    i=16 -> p
    i=17 -> q
    i=18 -> r
    i=19 -> s
    i=20 -> t
    i=21 -> u
    i=22 -> v
    i=23 -> w
    i=24 -> x
    i=25 -> y
    i=26 -> z
    i=27 -> aa
    i=28 -> ab
    i=29 -> ac
    i=30 -> ad
    i=31 -> ae
    i=32 -> af
    i=33 -> ag
    i=34 -> ah
    i=35 -> ai
    i=36 -> aj
    i=37 -> ak
    i=38 -> al
    i=39 -> am
    i=40 -> an
    i=41 -> ao
    i=42 -> ap
    i=43 -> aq
    i=44 -> ar
    i=45 -> as
    i=46 -> at
    i=47 -> au
    i=48 -> av
    i=49 -> aw
    i=50 -> ax
    i=51 -> ay
    i=52 -> az
    i=53 -> ba
    i=54 -> bb
    i=55 -> bc
    i=56 -> bd
    i=57 -> be
    i=58 -> bf
    i=59 -> bg
    i=60 -> bh
    i=61 -> bi
    i=62 -> bj
    i=63 -> bk
    i=64 -> bl
    i=65 -> bm
    i=66 -> bn
    i=67 -> bo
    i=68 -> bp
    i=69 -> bq
    i=70 -> br
    i=71 -> bs
    i=72 -> bt
    i=73 -> bu
    i=74 -> bv
    i=75 -> bw
    i=76 -> bx
    i=77 -> by
    i=78 -> bz
    i=79 -> ca
    i=80 -> cb
    i=81 -> cc
    i=82 -> cd
    i=83 -> ce
    i=84 -> cf
    i=85 -> cg
    i=86 -> ch
    i=87 -> ci
    i=88 -> cj
    i=89 -> ck
    i=90 -> cl
    i=91 -> cm
    i=92 -> cn
    i=93 -> co
    i=94 -> cp
    i=95 -> cq
    i=96 -> cr
    i=97 -> cs
    i=98 -> ct
    i=99 -> cu
    i=100 -> cv
    i=101 -> cw
    i=102 -> cx
    i=103 -> cy
    i=104 -> cz
    i=105 -> da
    i=106 -> db
    i=107 -> dc
    i=108 -> dd
    i=109 -> de
    i=110 -> df
    i=111 -> dg
    i=112 -> dh
    i=113 -> di
    i=114 -> dj
    i=115 -> dk
    i=116 -> dl
    i=117 -> dm
    i=118 -> dn
    i=119 -> do
    i=120 -> dp
    i=121 -> dq
    i=122 -> dr
    i=123 -> ds
    i=124 -> dt
    i=125 -> du
    i=126 -> dv
    i=127 -> dw
    i=128 -> dx
    i=129 -> dy
    i=130 -> dz
    i=131 -> ea
    i=132 -> eb
    i=133 -> ec
    i=134 -> ed
    i=135 -> ee
    i=136 -> ef
    i=137 -> eg
    i=138 -> eh
    i=139 -> ei
    i=140 -> ej
    i=141 -> ek
    i=142 -> el
    i=143 -> em
    i=144 -> en
    i=145 -> eo
    i=146 -> ep
    i=147 -> eq
    i=148 -> er
    i=149 -> es
    i=150 -> et
    i=151 -> eu
    i=152 -> ev
    i=153 -> ew
    i=154 -> ex
    i=155 -> ey
    i=156 -> ez
    i=157 -> fa
    i=158 -> fb
    i=159 -> fc
    i=160 -> fd
    i=161 -> fe
    i=162 -> ff
    i=163 -> fg
    i=164 -> fh
    i=165 -> fi
    i=166 -> fj
    i=167 -> fk
    i=168 -> fl
    i=169 -> fm
    i=170 -> fn
    i=171 -> fo
    i=172 -> fp
    i=173 -> fq
    i=174 -> fr
    i=175 -> fs
    i=176 -> ft
    i=177 -> fu
    i=178 -> fv
    i=179 -> fw
    i=180 -> fx
    i=181 -> fy
    i=182 -> fz
    i=183 -> ga
    i=184 -> gb
    i=185 -> gc
    i=186 -> gd
    i=187 -> ge
    i=188 -> gf
    i=189 -> gg
    i=190 -> gh
    i=191 -> gi
    i=192 -> gj
    i=193 -> gk
    i=194 -> gl
    i=195 -> gm
    i=196 -> gn
    i=197 -> go
    i=198 -> gp
    i=199 -> gq
    i=200 -> gr
    i=201 -> gs
    i=202 -> gt
    i=203 -> gu
    i=204 -> gv
    i=205 -> gw
    i=206 -> gx
    i=207 -> gy
    i=208 -> gz
    i=209 -> ha
    i=210 -> hb
    i=211 -> hc
    i=212 -> hd
    i=213 -> he
    i=214 -> hf
    i=215 -> hg
    i=216 -> hh
    i=217 -> hi
    i=218 -> hj
    i=219 -> hk
    i=220 -> hl
    i=221 -> hm
    i=222 -> hn
    i=223 -> ho
    i=224 -> hp
    i=225 -> hq
    i=226 -> hr
    i=227 -> hs
    i=228 -> ht
    i=229 -> hu
    i=230 -> hv
    i=231 -> hw
    i=232 -> hx
    i=233 -> hy
    i=234 -> hz
    i=235 -> ia
    i=236 -> ib
    i=237 -> ic
    i=238 -> id
    i=239 -> ie
    i=240 -> if
    i=241 -> ig
    i=242 -> ih
    i=243 -> ii
    i=244 -> ij
    i=245 -> ik
    i=246 -> il
    i=247 -> im
    i=248 -> in
    i=249 -> io
    i=250 -> ip
    i=251 -> iq
    i=252 -> ir
    i=253 -> is
    i=254 -> it
    i=255 -> iu

Best Regards

  • There is a bug with: i=52 -> aa. it's duplicated – oracleruiz May 15 '14 at 6:34
  • Thanks, Each 26 increments, 52,78,104,130,156,182,208,234 the bug was detected and Was fixed. – chepe lucho May 17 '14 at 3:05
2

This method generates Alpha Character Sequence

If called with null it return A. When called with A it returns B.

The sequence goes like A, B, C ...... Z, AA, AB, AC ..... AZ, BA, BB, BC.... BZ, CA, CB, CC....CZ, DA......ZA, ZB....ZZ, AAA, AAB, AAC....AAZ, ABA, ABB... AZZ, BAA, BAB....ZZZ

/**
* @param charSeqStr
* @return
*/

public static String getNextAlphaCharSequence(String charSeqStr) {

    String nextCharSeqStr       = null;
    char[] charSeqArr           = null;
    boolean isResetAllChar      = false;
    boolean isResetAfterIndex   = false;
    Integer resetAfterIndex     = 0;

    if (StringUtils.isBlank(charSeqStr)) {
        charSeqArr = new char[] { 'A' };
    } else {
        charSeqArr = charSeqStr.toCharArray();
        Integer charSeqLen = charSeqArr.length;

        for (int index = charSeqLen - 1; index >= 0; index--) {
            char charAtIndex = charSeqArr[index];

            if (Character.getNumericValue(charAtIndex) % 35 == 0) {
                if (index == 0) {
                    charSeqArr = Arrays.copyOf(charSeqArr, charSeqLen + 1);
                    isResetAllChar = true;
                } else {
                    continue;
                }
            } else {
                char nextCharAtIndex = (char) (charAtIndex + 1);
                charSeqArr[index] = nextCharAtIndex;
                if (index + 1 < charSeqLen) {
                    isResetAfterIndex = true;
                    resetAfterIndex = index;
                }
                break;
            }
        }
        charSeqLen = charSeqArr.length;
        if (isResetAllChar) {
            for (int index = 0; index < charSeqLen; index++) {
                charSeqArr[index] = 'A';
            }
        } else if (isResetAfterIndex) {
            for (int index = resetAfterIndex + 1; index < charSeqLen; index++) {
                charSeqArr[index] = 'A';
            }
        }
    }

    nextCharSeqStr = String.valueOf(charSeqArr);
    return nextCharSeqStr;
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    String nextAlphaSequence = null;
    for (int index = 0; index < 1000; index++) {
        nextAlphaSequence = getNextAlphaCharSequence(nextAlphaSequence);
        System.out.print(nextAlphaSequence + ",");
    }
}
1

I would suggest an iterator returning the next value.

The iterator needs to be able to create the string to return, based on internal counters. For your example it would be enough with two counters. One for the first character in the string, and one for the second character.

Each counter could correspond to the index in " ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ". When you've returned a string update the counter for the last position. If it falls "over the edge" reset it to point to "A" and increment the next counter. When that counter gets to large, either let the iterator indicate there is no more elements, or reset it to point to " " depending on what you need.

Note that by having the first position a blank, you can use trim() on the string to get rid of any spaces giving "A" for the first response.

1

Interestingly, no one has provided a Java 8-based functional solution yet. Here's a solution using jOOλ, which provides functionality like range() for characters, foldLeft() and crossJoin() (disclaimer, I work for the company that maintains jOOλ):

int max = 3;

List<String> alphabet = Seq
    .rangeClosed('A', 'Z')
    .map(Object::toString)
    .toList();

Seq.rangeClosed(1, max)
   .flatMap(length ->
       Seq.rangeClosed(1, length - 1)
          .foldLeft(Seq.seq(alphabet), (s, i) -> s.crossJoin(Seq.seq(alphabet))
                                                  .map(t -> t.v1 + t.v2)))
   .forEach(System.out::println);

This solution isn't really fast (e.g. as this one). I've just added it for completeness' sake.

1
    char ch;
    String str1 = "";
    String str2 = "";

    for (ch = 'A'; ch <= 'Z'; ch++) {
        str1 += ch;
        for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
            char upper = (char) ('A' + i);
            str2 = str2 + ch + upper + " ";

        }
    }

    System.out.println(str1 + ", " + str2);
0

This will create the sequence for passed value.

/**
 * Method that returns batch names based on passed value
 * @param batchCount
 * @return String[]
 */
public static String[] getBatchNamesForExecutor(int batchCount) {
    // Batch names array
    String[] batchNames = new String[batchCount];

    // Loop from 0 to batchCount required
    for(int index=0; index < batchCount; index++) {
        // Alphabet for current batch name 
        int alphabet = index%26;

        // iteration count happened on all alphabets till now
        int iterations = index/26;

        // initializing array element to blank string
        batchNames[index] = "";

        // Looping over the iterationIndex and creating batch alphabet prefix / prefixes
        for(int iterationIndex = 0; iterationIndex < iterations; iterationIndex+=26){
            batchNames[index] += String.valueOf((char)('A' + (iterations-1) % 26 ));
        }

        // Adding last alphabet in batch name
        batchNames[index] += String.valueOf((char)('A' + alphabet % 26 ));
    }

    return batchNames;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for(String s: getBatchNamesForExecutor(8))  {
        System.err.println(s);
    }
    System.exit(0); 
}
0

Just because I like short code … inspired by Thomas Jung’s answer:

static String asLetters(long value) {
    int codePoint = (int) ('A' + --value % 26);
    long higher = value / 26;
    String letter = new String(Character.toChars(codePoint));
    return higher == 0 ? letter : asLetters(higher).concat(letter);
}

Starts with 1 → a until Long.MAX_VALUECRPXNLSKVLJFHG. Use 'a' instead of 'A' for lowercase letters.

0

take 'A'to'Z' as 26radix. Example(C++)

    vector<string> generateSequenceBySize(int N)
    {
        if(N<1)
            return vector<string>();
        int base = 26;
        vector<string> seqs;
        for(int i=0;i<pow(base,N);i++)
        {
            int value = i;
            string tmp(N,'A');
            for (int j=0;j<N;j++)
            {
                tmp[N-1-j] = 'A'+value%base;
                value = value/base;
            }
            seqs.push_back(tmp);
        }
        return seqs;
    }
    vector<string> generateSequence()
    {
        //http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8710719/generating-an-alphabetic-sequence-in-java
        //A, B, C, ..., Z, AA, AB, AC, ..., ZZ.
        vector<string> seqs;
        for (int i=1;i<=2;i++)
        {
            vector<string> subSeq = generateSequenceBySize(i);
            seqs.insert(seqs.end(),subSeq.begin(),subSeq.end());
        }
        return seqs;
    }
0

I'm not familiar with functional programming in Java but I assume you could do something equivalent to this code in Haskell:

-- create a list ["A".."Z"]

uca = map (: []) ['A'..'Z']

-- cartesian product of two lists of strings , ++ concatenates two strings

cp lst1 lst2 =

    [x ++ y | x <- lst1, y <- lst2]

-- the following gives the required list of strings

uca ++ cp uca uca

0

All these long answers... and the ones that use recursion... wow. This can be done in Java in a few lines with no recursion:

private static String intToValueKey(int value) {
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(String.valueOf((char)('A'+(value % 26))));
    while((value = (value/26-1)) >= 0) {
        sb.append((char)('A'+(value % 26)));
    }
    return sb.reverse().toString();
}

Then you just call the method with increasing numeric value in a loop to generate the sequence from 0 to n.

for(int i=0; i<800; i++) {
    System.out.println(intToValueKey(i));
}

The reverse() at the end is just if you care about the order of letters and is not really needed if you're just looking for a unique permutation.

-1

Why don't creating the sequence recursively?

Example (untested):

public String createSequenceElement(int index) {
String sequenceElement = "";
int first  = index / 26;
int second = index % 26;
if (first < 1) {
    sequenceElement +=  (char) ('A' + second);
} else {
    sequenceElement +=  createSequenceElement(first) + (char) ('A' + second);
}
return sequenceElement ;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String sequence = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        if (i > 0) {
            sequence += ", ";
        }
        sequence += createSequenceElement(i);

    }
    System.out.println(sequence);
}
  • It did not work when I tested it. – Austin Henley Oct 1 '12 at 14:05

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